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Human Rights

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NEWS
November 17, 1994 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As he stood on the white porch of Bogor Palace to announce a trade-opening agreement for the Pacific Rim, Indonesian President Suharto was asked by a U.S. reporter about his country's human-rights abuses in East Timor. Suharto ignored the question. Hours later, Chinese President Jiang Zemin was also pressed about human- rights problems in his country. He gave his pat answer: Nations should not meddle in each other's domestic affairs. Try as they might not to mix business with human rights as they discuss regional trade here this week, Asian leaders are having a hard time keeping the two issues separate.
NEWS
October 16, 1986
In the United Nations, and among voluntary organizations worldwide, pressure for governments to respect human rights is growing. But each year hundreds of thousands of people are still being tortured, killed or detained for their political beliefs, according to the human rights group Amnesty International, in its latest annual report. Amnesty said that at least 1,125 individuals in 44 countries were killed by their governments in 1985. Prisoners were tortured in Chile and Cambodia, executed by the hundreds in Iran and Iraq, tortured, abducted or killed in police custody in South Africa and killed under Soviet occupation in Afghanistan and in many other countries.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
By Roger Pilon When we think of human-rights problems, most of us imagine arbitrary arrests, political repression, religious persecution, torture, show trials, censorship, and the like. In America, we don't often have those kinds of problems. Even the current controversy over an Islamic center near ground zero isn't about the right to build there; it's about the wisdom of doing so. All of which made it surprising to learn from the Obama State Department that America does indeed have human-rights problems.
NEWS
July 31, 2001
Since 1980, U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R., N.J.) has taken dozens of trips abroad to fight for the rights of those suffering under repressive regimes (Inquirer, July 23). His dedication to international human rights is commendable. He is not to be commended, however, on his own contributions to repressive regimes and human rights violations: his forceful opposition to safe and legal abortion in developing countries. If Smith were truly fighting for freedom of speech, he wouldn't ban overseas organizations from telling women information that could save their lives.
NEWS
April 6, 2004 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
CONDOLEEZZA Rice will be on the hot seat this week, fielding questions from the 9/11 commission. Unlike Richard Clarke, former anti-terrorism czar under the Clinton and Bush administrations, she doesn't have a book to peddle, so I don't anticipate any juicy soundbites, maudlin apologies to families who lost loved one on the day of terror or self-serving flip-flops. Say what you will, Condi is genuine, a woman of intelligence whose loyalty and competence are undisputed. Disagree with her positions, perhaps, but mistrust her motives?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Local producer Joseph Franklin says he's been waiting all year for this one: a concert titled Voices of Dissent, which his group, Relache, will perform here tomorrow and in Washington on May 27. Essentially a repeat of the group's favorite program of last season, Voices of Dissent is a lineup of scores whose focus is international human rights violations. John King's "(corn)" from the suite Immediate Music, and his Current Music "(constitutionmusic)," will be performed by the composer on steel violin.
NEWS
June 22, 1993 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
In Vienna this week, representatives of every country on earth are in conference on human rights. The conference's principal aim - as is to be expected of any conclave of 183 governments, the majority of which are despotic - is to destroy the human-rights idea. Washington sent Secretary of State Warren Christopher to Vienna to hold the fort. The results were mixed. The destroyers, led by China, Iran, Cuba, Vietnam and other paragons of human rights, are not very subtle. Their strategy is to shred the idea of human rights by having the world deny that they are universal and by insisting that they "must be considered in the context of . . . national and regional particularities and various historical, cultural and religious backgrounds.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By STEVEN L. CARTER
Is Moscow a proper site for the highest level review conference on human rights mandated by the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe? It is - if you accept the cemetery at Bitburg as deserving the laurels of a U.S. president. The administration's willingness to let Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev play host to such a conference in 1991 brings to mind Elie Wiesel's brief but eloquent plea on the eve of President Reagan's departure for Germany. Wiesel said: "This is not your place, Mr. President.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | By Thomas Farragher, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.N. Ambassador Madeleine K. Albright, hinting strongly that Hillary Rodham Clinton will visit China next month, said yesterday that the U.S. delegation would use an international conference in Beijing as a pulpit to decry China's human-rights abuses. "I'm not a diplomat," Albright said. "I'm somebody who speaks her mind. I'm not going to mince words in China. I'm going to say what we believe. " Albright said she had no plans to meet with Chinese officials to demand the release of human-rights activist Harry Wu. But she disagreed with Wu's wife, who has said that a trip to the conference by Clinton would be an unearned, symbolic reward to Wu's captors.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | By Jonathan Power
Amnesty International, founded 40 years ago, was almost immediately dubbed "one of the larger lunacies of our time. " The crazy idea: Collect information on people incarcerated in prison solely for their political views and then, by means of an army of volunteer activists, bombard the offending governments with letters, postcards and telegrams, calling for the prisoners' swift release. Critics called it "subversive" and "an agent of Satan. " Heavyweights including Ayatollah Khomieni, Idi Amin, Saddam Hussein, Augusto Pinochet, Margaret Thatcher, and Jacques Chirac tried to squash it. In the 1990s and after, some have argued that Amnesty has become respectable, a part of the international establishment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANYWHERE IN the world where injustice reared its ugly head, it wouldn't have been surprising to find Sheri Rosenberg there, fighting it. Sheri roamed the world lecturing on human-rights law and spoke tirelessly about the evils of genocide and the plight of all victims of intolerance. Much of her motivation stemmed from the fact that her late father, Marcus Rosenberg, survived the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz as a child, and her mother, Ann Pappenheim, escaped Vienna in 1939, a year after the Nazis took over.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts opened its season Saturday afternoon not in sylvan Fairmount Park but amid the golden glow of Mother Bethel AME Church's stained glass, its audience in the fervent communion of common purpose. Baltimore and social justice were on everyone's lips, even if nothing so specific could have been foreseen when plans for the concert were first laid. It was the kickoff of the Mann's Liberty Unplugged! festival, the music center's months-long focus on Frederick Douglass, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela, and so it was. But social justice being the unfinished business it is, by the time these musical performances and poetry readings reached the stage, they had gathered a new, grievous urgency.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melvin V. Dorn, 69, a North Philadelphia community advocate and civil rights activist who worked closely with Cecil B. Moore and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., died Monday, July 21, of heart failure at Einstein Medical Center. Mr. Dorn was a stalwart in Philadelphia civil rights efforts, including protests against segregation at Girard College. It was during those protests that Mr. Dorn began working with Moore, the lawyer and civil rights leader. In an interview in January, Mr. Dorn recalled that before he worked with King and Moore, he was a tough teen from North Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
W EARING A white shirt that said, "End terrorism, support Israel," Rachel Rosenberg, 24, of Spring Garden, said she wanted to educate people that Hamas is a terrorist group responsible for most of the civilian deaths in Gaza. Across the street, Alex Ibrahim, 26, a Palestinian Muslim who lives in North Philadelphia, said he wanted the bombings to stop - especially from Israelis, who he said are targeting civilians and children. At a rally featuring speakers ranging from local religious leaders to politicians, several hundred pro-Israel supporters gathered in LOVE Park yesterday to show solidarity for the country and its right to defend itself.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT HOLLY Officials from the human rights group Amnesty International are investigating the deaths of two Burlington County Jail inmates, saying a letter they received from the Prosecutor's Office detailing the circumstances only bolstered their suspicions that at least one of the inmates was neglected. Robert Taylor, 75, a homeless man, died Dec. 30 in the jail. Jerome Iozzia, 50, of Browns Mills, died Feb. 25. Both deaths were ruled to be from natural causes, and the Prosecutor's Office ruled out wrongdoing by correctional officers.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By David Crary, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Amid a surge of antigay violence and repression in several countries, the United Nations' human-rights office on Friday launched its first global outreach campaign to promote tolerance and greater equality for lesbians, gays, transgender people, and bisexuals. Called Free and Equal, it's an unprecedented effort by the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights to change public attitudes around the world on issues that have bitterly divided the United Nations' own member states.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Albert Aji and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
DAMASCUS, Syria - Government forces captured a historic mosque in the central city of Homs on Saturday, expelling rebel forces who had been in control of the 13th-century landmark for more than a year and dealing a symbolic blow to opposition forces. State-run news agency SANA quoted an unnamed military official as saying that troops took control of the Khalid Ibn al-Walid Mosque in the heavily disputed northern neighborhood of Khaldiyeh. Syrian TV aired a report Saturday night with footage from inside the mosque, showing heavy damage and the tomb's dome knocked out. The footage showed debris strewn on the floor, and a portion of the mosque appeared to have been burned.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
JERUSALEM - Israeli and Palestinian officials voiced skepticism yesterday that they can move toward a peace deal, as the sides inched toward what may be the first round of significant negotiations in five years. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced late last week that an agreement has been reached that establishes the basis for resuming peace talks. He cautioned that such an agreement still needs to be formalized, suggesting that gaps remain. In his first on-camera comment yesterday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared to lower expectations by saying the talks will be tough and any agreement would have to be ratified by Israelis in a national referendum.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Barbara Surk, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syrian government forces bombed a strategic rebel town in the country's north for the third straight day Saturday, pounding it with air strikes that killed at least five people, activists said. President Bashar al-Assad's troops in recent weeks have seized the momentum in the civil war, now in its third year. Regime forces have been on the offensive against rebels on several fronts, including in the northern Idlib province along the border with Turkey. In Idlib, government forces besieged the town of Saraqeb during the week, hitting it with rockets, tank fire, and air raids, said the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert P. Perry, 82, of Churchville, Bucks County, a scientist whose early research helped unravel the mysteries of DNA, died Monday, July 15, at home of complications from neuropathy. Born in Chicago, he graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in mathematics in 1951 and earned his doctorate in biophysics at the University of Chicago in 1956. At the time, the helical structure of DNA had just been discovered. Dr. Perry devoted his career to studying how the structural and functional characteristics of living cells are determined by the information encoded in their genes.
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