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Human Rights

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NEWS
November 17, 1994 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As he stood on the white porch of Bogor Palace to announce a trade-opening agreement for the Pacific Rim, Indonesian President Suharto was asked by a U.S. reporter about his country's human-rights abuses in East Timor. Suharto ignored the question. Hours later, Chinese President Jiang Zemin was also pressed about human- rights problems in his country. He gave his pat answer: Nations should not meddle in each other's domestic affairs. Try as they might not to mix business with human rights as they discuss regional trade here this week, Asian leaders are having a hard time keeping the two issues separate.
NEWS
October 16, 1986
In the United Nations, and among voluntary organizations worldwide, pressure for governments to respect human rights is growing. But each year hundreds of thousands of people are still being tortured, killed or detained for their political beliefs, according to the human rights group Amnesty International, in its latest annual report. Amnesty said that at least 1,125 individuals in 44 countries were killed by their governments in 1985. Prisoners were tortured in Chile and Cambodia, executed by the hundreds in Iran and Iraq, tortured, abducted or killed in police custody in South Africa and killed under Soviet occupation in Afghanistan and in many other countries.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
By Roger Pilon When we think of human-rights problems, most of us imagine arbitrary arrests, political repression, religious persecution, torture, show trials, censorship, and the like. In America, we don't often have those kinds of problems. Even the current controversy over an Islamic center near ground zero isn't about the right to build there; it's about the wisdom of doing so. All of which made it surprising to learn from the Obama State Department that America does indeed have human-rights problems.
NEWS
July 31, 2001
Since 1980, U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R., N.J.) has taken dozens of trips abroad to fight for the rights of those suffering under repressive regimes (Inquirer, July 23). His dedication to international human rights is commendable. He is not to be commended, however, on his own contributions to repressive regimes and human rights violations: his forceful opposition to safe and legal abortion in developing countries. If Smith were truly fighting for freedom of speech, he wouldn't ban overseas organizations from telling women information that could save their lives.
NEWS
April 6, 2004 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
CONDOLEEZZA Rice will be on the hot seat this week, fielding questions from the 9/11 commission. Unlike Richard Clarke, former anti-terrorism czar under the Clinton and Bush administrations, she doesn't have a book to peddle, so I don't anticipate any juicy soundbites, maudlin apologies to families who lost loved one on the day of terror or self-serving flip-flops. Say what you will, Condi is genuine, a woman of intelligence whose loyalty and competence are undisputed. Disagree with her positions, perhaps, but mistrust her motives?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Local producer Joseph Franklin says he's been waiting all year for this one: a concert titled Voices of Dissent, which his group, Relache, will perform here tomorrow and in Washington on May 27. Essentially a repeat of the group's favorite program of last season, Voices of Dissent is a lineup of scores whose focus is international human rights violations. John King's "(corn)" from the suite Immediate Music, and his Current Music "(constitutionmusic)," will be performed by the composer on steel violin.
NEWS
June 22, 1993 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
In Vienna this week, representatives of every country on earth are in conference on human rights. The conference's principal aim - as is to be expected of any conclave of 183 governments, the majority of which are despotic - is to destroy the human-rights idea. Washington sent Secretary of State Warren Christopher to Vienna to hold the fort. The results were mixed. The destroyers, led by China, Iran, Cuba, Vietnam and other paragons of human rights, are not very subtle. Their strategy is to shred the idea of human rights by having the world deny that they are universal and by insisting that they "must be considered in the context of . . . national and regional particularities and various historical, cultural and religious backgrounds.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By STEVEN L. CARTER
Is Moscow a proper site for the highest level review conference on human rights mandated by the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe? It is - if you accept the cemetery at Bitburg as deserving the laurels of a U.S. president. The administration's willingness to let Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev play host to such a conference in 1991 brings to mind Elie Wiesel's brief but eloquent plea on the eve of President Reagan's departure for Germany. Wiesel said: "This is not your place, Mr. President.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | By Thomas Farragher, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.N. Ambassador Madeleine K. Albright, hinting strongly that Hillary Rodham Clinton will visit China next month, said yesterday that the U.S. delegation would use an international conference in Beijing as a pulpit to decry China's human-rights abuses. "I'm not a diplomat," Albright said. "I'm somebody who speaks her mind. I'm not going to mince words in China. I'm going to say what we believe. " Albright said she had no plans to meet with Chinese officials to demand the release of human-rights activist Harry Wu. But she disagreed with Wu's wife, who has said that a trip to the conference by Clinton would be an unearned, symbolic reward to Wu's captors.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | By Jonathan Power
Amnesty International, founded 40 years ago, was almost immediately dubbed "one of the larger lunacies of our time. " The crazy idea: Collect information on people incarcerated in prison solely for their political views and then, by means of an army of volunteer activists, bombard the offending governments with letters, postcards and telegrams, calling for the prisoners' swift release. Critics called it "subversive" and "an agent of Satan. " Heavyweights including Ayatollah Khomieni, Idi Amin, Saddam Hussein, Augusto Pinochet, Margaret Thatcher, and Jacques Chirac tried to squash it. In the 1990s and after, some have argued that Amnesty has become respectable, a part of the international establishment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2016
Ryan T. Anderson is the William E. Simon senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation and author of the just-released book, "Truth Overruled: The Future of Marriage and Religious Freedom. " You know gender-identity issues are getting lots of attention when it prompts one gay-rights activist to start a campaign called "Drop the T. " Its goal: to kick transgender out of the standard LGBT acronym for being "ultimately regressive and actually hostile to the goals of women and gay men. " Whatever happens within the LGBT community, one thing is clear: Government should not take sides in the transgender debate.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
HERE'S THE THING about Bruce Springsteen: The man has a remarkable knack for doing the right thing in his public life. The bard of America's deindustrialization of the 1970s and '80s, Springsteen has long collected food and made donations to local poverty programs - and then he began to see the connections between the blue-collar struggles he sang about and the politics around him. When an unarmed immigrant named Amadou Diallo was killed by 41 shots...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2016 | By Annie Monjar, For The Inquirer
Once again, the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts (PIFA) has descended on the city with performances and events by some of the world's most distinctive artists starting today through April 23, when the fest culminates in a massive street fair. Once again, you're likely to be overwhelmed by programing (more than 60 events this year) and need someone to pull the absolute cannot-misses from the spread. We found eight shows worth adding to your calendar, with a focus on the free, kid-friendly, and wacky-in-a-good-way.
NEWS
March 19, 2016
ISSUE | PEARL S. BUCK A champion of rights I was so pleased to read about another creative dimension of Pearl S. Buck's prodigious social and literary output - a comic book series focused on discriminatory practices in the mid-1940s ("Her hero fought for everyone," Monday). In preparation for my acceptance of the Pearl S. Buck 2015 Woman of the Year award last spring, I researched the woman I thought I knew. As with so many others, it was only peripherally. Buck was an outspoken radical - decades ahead of her time - on issues of peace, social and economic justice, racial equality, and feminism.
NEWS
February 24, 2016
By Joseph Betz The correct way to understand Bernie Sanders' socialism is to relate it to the United Nations' 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A human right is a justified claim of all people to what they need not only to live but to flourish and develop their unique potential. The first 21 articles of the declaration list civil and political rights, including rights to life, property, and equality under law. Such rights are basic to democracy, requiring some governmental protection but also governmental noninterference in our lives.
NEWS
January 25, 2016 | DEUTSCHE PRESSE-AGENTUR
BEIRUT - At least 29 civilians were killed Saturday in airstrikes targeting areas under the control of Islamic State in eastern Syria, a monitoring group said. Jets believed to be Russian struck Khsham are on the eastern outskirts of Deir al-Zour province, said the head of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, Rami Abdel- Rahman. Those deaths bring to at least 73 the number of civilians killed since Friday in airstrikes in the province, according to the Britain-based observatory.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Born in Cambodia, raised in two refugee camps after her family escaped Pol Pot's dictatorship, Leendavy Koung is a master of Asian arts and culture in Philadelphia. In November, she sat for a videotaped interview as part of Article 13 , a fiery French-Mexican multimedia production about migration, scheduled for its U.S. premiere in Philadelphia in April. Despite the strain of refugee life, Koung, 43, said she learned from her parents to appreciate and promote Khmer classical music and folk dance.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | DEUTSCHE PRESSE-AGENTUR
CAIRO - Islamic State fighters have abducted at least 400 civilians in eastern Syria after an attack by the Islamic militants in which at least 135 people were killed, a monitoring group said Sunday. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Islamic State moved the seized people from the village of al-Baghaliyeh after the attack Saturday. The militants captured the village, said the watchdog, which relies on a network of activists in Syria. "We fear that the 400 will be executed or enslaved by the organization on the pretext that they are loyal to the regime," said Rami Abdel-Rahman, head of the observatory.
NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Robert O. Davis, 90, of Cape May, pastor and choir director from 1961 to 2009 of Macedonia Baptist Church there, died Saturday, Dec. 26, at Cape Regional Medical Center in Cape May Court House. The calling to a life of ministry came early to the North Carolinian. "He was a boy preacher, at 16, in his church in High Point," son Robert O. Jr. said. Born in Lexington, N.C., Mr. Davis earned a bachelor's degree in psychology at what is now Virginia University of Lynchburg and a master of divinity there.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Carroll A. Weinberg, 87, a Wynnewood psychiatrist and human-rights expert, died Wednesday, Dec. 16, of cancer. Trained as a pediatrician, Dr. Weinberg spent the bulk of his career in psychiatry, working with children and adults, and teaching at Drexel University's College of Medicine. Locally, he practiced at the Philadelphia General Hospital and at Hahnemann University Hospital. Professionally, he explored the psychology of suicide terrorism, torture, and ethnic conflict; personally, he was deeply interested in civic affairs and the arts.
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