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Human Rights Activists

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NEWS
December 21, 1992 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sharfuddin Mansoori, 28, lay in a steel-frame hospital bed, his left leg wrapped in white gauze from his toes to his hip. Blood stained the sheet. Mansoori, father of four children, owns a store in the Welcome Colony neighborhood here. "Specialist in cotton and foam," says his business card. On Dec. 11, he said, he was in his store when he heard many people shouting and throwing stones. He walked outside his store to take a look. Suddenly he felt a blinding pain in his leg. He had been shot.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
A commission of prominent citizens from six countries will investigate the Raoul Wallenberg case in what is the first international effort to uncover the fate of the Swedish diplomat who rescued an estimated 100,000 Jews during World War II. Soviet documents could hold the key to the Wallenberg mystery. The Soviet government has refused to participate in any international commission. However, a Soviet scholar will participate on the panel. Soviet authorities have said Wallenberg died in prison in 1947 after he was arrested for unknown reasons.
NEWS
August 15, 1998 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT The Associated Press contributed to this article
Eighteen political activists, including 19-year-old Michele Keegan of New Jersey, detained in Myanmar for distributing pro-democracy leaflets, arrived in Thailand early this morning after being permitted to leave Myanmar on the condition that they never again violate its laws. A judge had sentenced the group to five years of hard labor. Then, an official from the Ministry of Home Affairs read an order reducing the sentences and saying that the activists would be deported within a day. The defendants' dismay turned to jubilation upon hearing the second decision.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The accused criminal limped into the courtroom, his jacket and pants rumpled and dirty, two green-uniformed military officers on either side of him. He had come not to defend himself, but to confess all. "I suggested that we steal Yang Xisheng's car and sell it," Gao Hongliang, a 25-year-old taxi driver, told the People's Court of Haidian District. "I asked Zhao Yu to make a copy of Yang Xisheng's car key. " It took all of one hour to try Gao and find him guilty. O.J. Simpson wouldn't stand a chance in China.
NEWS
July 25, 2008 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
THE Beijing Olympics have triggered an impressive amount of outrage among human-rights activists and everyone else who has a bone to pick with China. Critics have taken advantage of this golden opportunity to prick the conscience of the West, invoking the ghosts of Tianamen Square and Mao's Cultural Revolution. They've urged President Bush to engage in a diplomatic boycott reminiscent of Jimmy Carter's Moscow mistake, and have even gone so far as to demand that athletes who've spent their entire lives training for this irreplaceable moment stay home.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Secretary of State Colin L. Powell begins his Middle East trip here today, his top priority will be urging Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and other Arab leaders to help the United States contain Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. But Arab human-rights activists and some American Muslims are prodding Powell and the Bush administration to pay more attention to the abuses committed by the United States' allies in the region. By ignoring official corruption, rigged elections and political repression, these activists argue, the United States is risking political explosions that could topple some of its best friends in the Arab world, in much the same way an Islamic revolution ousted the shah of Iran in 1979.
NEWS
October 11, 2003 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
In a surprise announcement sure to bolster Iran's flagging human-rights movement, the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded its 2003 Peace Prize to Iranian lawyer Shirin Ebadi, whose campaign on behalf of Iranian children and women earned her a prison sentence and banishment from her profession. The news was virtually ignored by Iran's state-run media, but word spread among jubilant writers, human-rights activists, and reformist legislators there. Ebadi, 56, who is visiting Paris this week, told friends and family she was surprised and thrilled at being selected.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | By Rachel L. Jones, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Hundreds of women's advocacy groups are considering bypassing a U.N. women's conference in Beijing this fall after a deadline of yesterday was missed in a messy dispute over the meeting site. Just three months before the U.N. Fourth World Conference on Women, the women's groups are protesting their treatment by the Chinese government. They want the Non-Governmental Organization Forum, a meeting of an estimated 35,000 female advocacy and human-rights activists, to be held where they originally were promised, inside the Beijing city limits.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
THE Beijing Olympics have triggered an impressive amount of outrage among human-rights activists and everyone else who has a bone to pick with China. Critics have taken advantage of this golden opportunity to prick the conscience of the West, invoking the ghosts of Tianamen Square and Mao's Cultural Revolution. They've urged President Bush to engage in a diplomatic boycott reminiscent of Jimmy Carter's Moscow mistake, and have even gone so far as to demand that athletes who've spent their entire lives training for this irreplaceable moment stay home.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leading the violent protests in Seoul and other cities is a hard core of leftist students determined to oust the government of President Chun Doo Hwan and end the country's alliance with the United States. In recent months, these students have been joined by less militant student leaders, human rights activists, church groups and traditional politicians as dissent has moved off the campuses and into the downtown streets of the largest cities. The militant students also seek a reunification of the two Koreas, but deny they are communists and reject North Korea's communist leader, Kim Il Sung, as a potential leader of a united Korea.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MONTERREY, Mexico - Even in a career full of threats and harassment, the day someone deposited four cats at her office door, all with their throats slit, stands out for Consuelo Morales. "They were telling us to be quiet, or we'd be next," she says. That was 14 years ago, and she is still anything but quiet. The 63-year-old Roman Catholic nun is one of Mexico's most indefatigable and effective defenders of human rights. As the country staggers into a sixth year of drug war violence, Sister Consuelo, as her colleagues call her, has more work than ever.
NEWS
April 30, 2011 | By Hannah Allam, Andrew Bossone, and Jonathan S. Landay, McClatchy Newspapers
CAIRO - Defying tanks, troops, and gunfire, thousands took to the streets Friday across Syria to protest the regime's bloody crackdown on a six-week-old uprising and demand the ouster of President Bashar al-Assad, according to witnesses, activists, and news reports. Human-rights activists said more than 60 people were killed; about half were gunned down as they tried to breach a blockade by tank-backed soldiers in Daraa, the southern city where the gravest challenge to more than four decades of Assad family dictatorship began.
NEWS
July 25, 2008 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
THE Beijing Olympics have triggered an impressive amount of outrage among human-rights activists and everyone else who has a bone to pick with China. Critics have taken advantage of this golden opportunity to prick the conscience of the West, invoking the ghosts of Tianamen Square and Mao's Cultural Revolution. They've urged President Bush to engage in a diplomatic boycott reminiscent of Jimmy Carter's Moscow mistake, and have even gone so far as to demand that athletes who've spent their entire lives training for this irreplaceable moment stay home.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
THE Beijing Olympics have triggered an impressive amount of outrage among human-rights activists and everyone else who has a bone to pick with China. Critics have taken advantage of this golden opportunity to prick the conscience of the West, invoking the ghosts of Tianamen Square and Mao's Cultural Revolution. They've urged President Bush to engage in a diplomatic boycott reminiscent of Jimmy Carter's Moscow mistake, and have even gone so far as to demand that athletes who've spent their entire lives training for this irreplaceable moment stay home.
NEWS
June 30, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
On a bright spring day, when Michael Coard was 10 years old and skinny as a twig, he made the trek undertaken by thousands of Philadelphia schoolchildren before and since. He visited the Liberty Bell. What is this, he wondered, looking at 2,080 pounds of cracked bronze, then hanging in Independence Hall. What's so exciting? His beaming white Masterman classmates seemed to share a good secret he did not understand. None of the rangers - all white men - who talked to the class mentioned slavery or abolitionism, the Civil War or civil rights.
NEWS
August 25, 2004 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Susan L. Burke was irked two years ago after reading an article about the interrogation of suspected terrorists. The Philadelphia lawyer was particularly piqued by a comment attributed to an anonymous interrogator: "If you don't violate someone's human rights some of the time, you probably aren't doing your job," the Washington Post quoted the U.S. official as saying. Concerned that the U.S. military was torturing detainees in Afghanistan and at Guantanamo Bay, Burke began researching legal means to force the government to toe the line.
NEWS
May 23, 2004 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeking unity in an increasingly divided Arab world that is going through what one diplomat called a "period of despair," leaders of 22 Middle Eastern, Persian Gulf and North African nations met yesterday for the Arab League summit. The meeting had been postponed for two months because there was no consensus on such issues as the U.S. military occupation of Iraq, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and democratic reforms in Arab countries. Scheduled for March, the two-day meeting opened yesterday with consensus still being sought.
NEWS
October 11, 2003 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
In a surprise announcement sure to bolster Iran's flagging human-rights movement, the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded its 2003 Peace Prize to Iranian lawyer Shirin Ebadi, whose campaign on behalf of Iranian children and women earned her a prison sentence and banishment from her profession. The news was virtually ignored by Iran's state-run media, but word spread among jubilant writers, human-rights activists, and reformist legislators there. Ebadi, 56, who is visiting Paris this week, told friends and family she was surprised and thrilled at being selected.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Secretary of State Colin L. Powell begins his Middle East trip here today, his top priority will be urging Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and other Arab leaders to help the United States contain Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. But Arab human-rights activists and some American Muslims are prodding Powell and the Bush administration to pay more attention to the abuses committed by the United States' allies in the region. By ignoring official corruption, rigged elections and political repression, these activists argue, the United States is risking political explosions that could topple some of its best friends in the Arab world, in much the same way an Islamic revolution ousted the shah of Iran in 1979.
NEWS
August 15, 1998 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT The Associated Press contributed to this article
Eighteen political activists, including 19-year-old Michele Keegan of New Jersey, detained in Myanmar for distributing pro-democracy leaflets, arrived in Thailand early this morning after being permitted to leave Myanmar on the condition that they never again violate its laws. A judge had sentenced the group to five years of hard labor. Then, an official from the Ministry of Home Affairs read an order reducing the sentences and saying that the activists would be deported within a day. The defendants' dismay turned to jubilation upon hearing the second decision.
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