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Human Rights

NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
The United Nations will continue heralding its Universal Declaration of Human Rights on Friday with six commemoratives featuring the text of the document and works of art. The stamps will include Articles 19 through 24, with the declaration printed on attached tabs, or margins. This is the fourth year of the series; it will be completed next year with the final six articles. Article 19, upholding the freedom of expression, and Article 20, proclaiming the freedom to hold peaceful assembly, will be depicted on stamps of 29 cents and 50 cents U.S. currency.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | Michelle Malkin
Former president George Bush wants you to know that China has made "great strides" in human rights. He is so impressed with China's promotion of individual freedoms that he urged Congress last weekend to side with President Clinton and embrace permanent normal trade relations with the Communist Chinese government. There is at least one citizen of China who might beg to differ with Presidents Bush and Clinton. His name is Li Lusong. The 20-year-old villager won't be able to speak his mind, however, because he no longer can speak.
NEWS
December 12, 1988 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Dear Mr. McKinney: In your Dec. 5 column, you made reference to the expectations that Mikhail Gorbachev would turn the "human rights" tables on Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher by asking her about Britain's shabby record of abuses against the Irish. I wish you had gone into more detail on this. There was a brief story on cable news to the effect that Gorbachev intended to press Thatcher on two controversial cases, one involving the Birmingham Six and the other the Gillford Four.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
He is still the soft-spoken peacemaker - a humble optimist who solves world conflicts, a father figure who lobbies for peace and virtue. One day he'll be fly fishing in a Central Pennsylvania creek or climbing Japan's Mount Fuji. The next he'll be presiding over the first Palestinian elections or traveling to Africa to help care for its children. That's how former President Jimmy Carter spends his golden years. Carter, in Philadelphia today to deliver the University of Pennsylvania commencement address, said in an interview that he is enjoying retirement in Plains, Ga., and life with his wife Rosalynn.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Ali Abunimah
I am coming to the University of Pennsylvania this week to incite violence against the State of Israel - pro-Israel groups and commentators have contended - and, along with hundreds of students and other speakers who will attend the 2012 National Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Conference, to engage in an "act of warfare. " Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, we are coming together to push forward an inclusive movement that supports nonviolent action to promote the human rights of the Palestinian people, because only full respect for these rights can lead to peace.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | By Khaled Abou Fadl
The U.S. State Department recently issued a report on Christian persecution, focusing on China and several Muslim countries. The report has initiated a debate on the issues of religious persecution, human rights and U.S. policy. As a member of the Lawyers' Committee for Human Rights, I have evaluated cases of human-rights violations, primarily in Muslim countries. One of the most recent examples involved a religious man from a Muslim country. He was visited by security forces at dawn, taken from his place of residence, beaten with cables, hung in contorted positions and stung with electrical prods.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | By Jerome J. Shestack
The international human-rights movement is the most important social movement since the Second World War, the one that, despite bumps in the road, characterizes this half of the century more than any other. After the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the promise of the human-rights movement was not immediately kept. Eastern Europe became a communist monolith suppressing civil and political rights. Authoritarian governments became dominant in most of South America and in large portions of Asia, Africa and the Mideast.
NEWS
March 8, 1997
When the Clinton administration broke the link between China's human rights performance and trade, U.S. officials insisted that they were not letting Beijing completely off the hook. The idea - a sensible one - was to press Beijing to live up to international human rights standards, which China takes quite seriously, rather than to U.S. ideals. This would change the context from a tense, bilateral tussle to a broader effort to get China to sign and adhere to specific multilateral covenants, on trade and military issues, as well as human rights.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
Human rights violations don't happen here, most Americans like to think. The violation of human rights is something that used to take place in the old Soviet bloc and continues to happen in other faraway places, in the North Koreas and El Salvadors of the world. Out there, governments routinely abuse citizens and literally get away with murder. That is why there are Western organizations like Amnesty International to stop these Third World atrocities - or at least to denounce them.
NEWS
November 27, 1999
Human-rights activists have long opposed trade with China, and among the loudest such voices has been that of Harry Wu. Imprisoned in China during the Cultural Revolution, Wu immigrated to the United States in 1985, and he has testified frequently before Congress about China's human-rights abuses. In the early '90s, Wu traveled to China to document conditions in forced-labor camps. He was expelled in 1995. Wu is executive director of the Laogai Research Foundation, an organization dedicated to investigating evidence of Chinese forced-labor camps and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.
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