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Human Spirit

NEWS
November 3, 1994 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
There is no bitterness in Ann Weiss's voice as she speaks from a hospital bed, where a morphine drip is keeping the raging pain at bay. Her tone is almost bright, her mind clear, even as the disease plays hide-and-seek - racing about from brain to ribs to legs. It began 15 years ago when she was 30, with a lump under her breast. "I went in for a biopsy and when the doctor came into the recovery room all I had to do was look at his face to know the answer . . . he was in tears.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
I admit I'm feeling lousy today because one of the most significant human rights organizations in this region is on its deathbed, and not many people seem to care. After more than 53 years of advocacy and activism on issues ranging from educational equality to gun control to police accountability and fair-election practices, the Fellowship Commission may take its final breath within the next 30 days. It needs $150,000 to keep going for another year, but it's broke. The private giving and foundation grants that have sustained it have dried up. Evidently, not enough people think that a group that promotes fellowship is worthy of support.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
It's a global village, all right, and that just makes it harder to keep the creeps out. Many American parents have disabled their home telephones from calling 900 numbers, lest their rambunctious and inquisitive offspring decide to call one of the phone-sex lines advertised on cable television or the back pages of selected magazines. This worthy precaution has financial as well as moral motivations; the lines can charge up to $3 a minute. Now, this parental blockade has sprung a leak.
NEWS
June 25, 1994
TO JAPANESE, UNMENTIONABLE WAR What a change a week makes! First, near-saturation coverage of the Normandy hoopla. Then the emperor and empress of Japan visit the United States and - SHHH! - no mention of World War II. No visit to the Pearl Harbor Memorial allowed by the Tokyo government, lest it seen as if he might be apologizing. Japan today, where a cabinet officer may choose to deny the rape of Nanking and a leading liberal political leader publishes a blueprint for the future with quotes from "Mein Kampf," may prefer to gloss over 1931-1945.
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Excerpts from Nelson Mandela's victory speech on Monday: To all those in the African National Congress and the democratic movement who worked so hard these last few days and through these many decades, I thank you and honor you. To the people of South Africa and the world who are watching: This is indeed a joyous night for the human spirit. This is your victory, too. You helped end apartheid, you stood with us through the transition. . . . I am your servant. I don't come to you as a leader, as one above others.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robin Chew pressed forward through the crush of people, hoping simply to touch her. "I'm 21," said Chew, of Southwest Philadelphia, who works as an item processor in a bank. "Reading her poems is like something I've never experienced before in my life. " Maya Angelou - poet and professor, actress and journalist - graced Philadelphia with her presence yesterday, speaking, singing and inspiring at the first event of the "Make Unity Work" campaign sponsored by the Fellowship Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When a natural disaster strikes a part of the world that is already struggling, news footage tends to make the misery faceless. In And Life Goes On, a unique documentary filmed amid the rubble of the 1990 earthquake that took 50,000 lives in northern Iran, Abbas Kiarostami tells stories that render the suffering individual and vivid. And Life Goes On celebrates the resilience of the human spirit and movingly expands the traditional limits of the documentary. Kiarostami shot an earlier film in a now-devastated village, and in this work, he chronicles his search for the two boys who starred in it and who are now somewhere - alive or dead - in the ruins.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Everyone thought it came to an inglorious end last year with 300 onlookers, a straggling gaggle of a parade and founder Joseph Zanghi's lament: "It's dead. It's dead. It's all over. " But, hey, it ain't over. Cherry Hill's Cherry Blossom Festival is back for its 21st year, neither bigger nor brighter than ever, but back, nonetheless - sans parade. "Tell the people, 'Hey, we're back and we didn't get blasted off the face of the Earth last year,' " Zanghi said last week.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 100 years, the Whosoever Gospel Mission has been an institution of diverse and persistent purpose in the heart of Germantown. The mission's home, for all but three of those 100 years, has been a four- story building on Chelten Avenue that is today crowned by a decrepit sign proclaiming, "Jesus Never Fails. " From the very beginning, the bedrock idea of the mission was to deal with the numerous man-made failures that can afflict a life or a community. Over the hundred years, those who have sought help from the Whosoever Gospel Mission have been among the city's most needy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1992 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
AIDS kills. It destroys livelihoods. But it need not destroy the spirit. That's what baritone William Parker proved so movingly in his AIDS Quilt Songbook 1992 recital Friday in Princeton University's Richardson Auditorium. The singer reportedly has lost 35 pounds and suffers from Kaposi's sarcoma, an AIDS-related cancer. Moreover, his highly successful career in opera, oratorio and recital has ended; management, fearing his illness might cause cancellations, no longer books engagements for him. Yet, there he stood, singing songs of varied quality that he has asked composers (famous and not-so-famous)
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