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Human Waste

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NEWS
January 28, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The FAA calls it "blue ice," a refreshingly wintry euphemism for the shower of human waste that splattered onto Barbara and Dan Plata's Gloucester County home this week. When the Platas found tarry, gritty drops on their driveway and the north side of their Olympia Lane home in Washington Township, they suspected that a large passenger plane had dumped human waste on their Green Valley subdivision between 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Tuesday. On Thursday, county and federal health investigators confirmed that.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Earle Woodford spends much of her time on the porch of her home in the Crestmont section of the township, watching the neighborhood children ride by on their bicycles and admiring her flower boxes filled with petunias, marigolds and brown-eyed susans. But sitting outdoors in the 1500 block of Prospect Avenue has not been so pleasant recently. A run-down home across from Woodford's has been ordered vacated by the township for being "dangerous," and because activities there have created a health hazard and a stench, said Larry Matteo, Abington's superintendent of code enforcement.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Adrienne Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
A well in the Westwood section of Valley Township is contaminated with human waste from the township's sewer lines and Valley supervisors are dragging their feet in fixing it, the owners of the well charged last week. Linda Hoopes and Anthony Semenvick of Valley Road made the assertions at Tuesday's Board of Supervisors meeting. Hoopes asked the township to pay for a new well. The supervisors decided, however, to let the township insurance carrier investigate the reason for the contamination.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
A group of about 50 East Germantown residents today staged a sign-waving protest outside a lot where they say human waste is dumped from tour buses. "The air is hazardous to our health around here," said Edward Campbell, president of the East Germantown Concerned Citizens and one of several protesters who wore surgical masks. Three tour buses and a half-dozen sizable trucks were parked on the long, narrow block bordered by 21st Street, Godfrey Avenue and Wister and Laveer streets.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
Resident Jim Melvin says he is afraid his town might gain a reputation as the "Colwyn Crappers" if the Johnny-on-the-Spot company at Fifth and Ellis Streets doesn't clean up its act. About 30 residents supported Melvin at the Borough Council's Thursday meeting when he told council members that human waste had been found in several of the "porta-potties" that were stored at the Delaware County Business Plaza. The waste disposal company has been a tenant of the plaza owned by John Cacciutti for the last three to four months and has a permit to store only empty, sanitized "porta-potties," according to George Paylor, the borough code enforcer.
NEWS
August 21, 2004
Someone ought to give a citation for meaness to the U.S. Park Service ranger who issued a ticket to a woman who had to act quickly when her little boy had waited as long as he could to answer nature's call. A woman and her 3-year-old son had just come out of the new Liberty Bell pavilion two weeks ago when the boy made clear he had to relieve himself. She tried to take him back inside, not knowing there weren't bathrooms in there. She stopped anyhow when she saw the sign barring her from entering.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Darnetta Green-Mason has put up with a lot of stuff. Three buckets of stuff to be exact - found last weekend when she and other residents cleared debris from an overgrown lot on the corner of 49th and Reno streets, West Philadelphia. The stuff, originally found near a toppled, retired Port-O-Potty, has been out on the corner, uncovered, for the last six days. And you know what that means. "In this warm weather, you can really smell it," said Mason, 45, the local block captain who happens to live across the street.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the wind is right, which is most of the time, the odor of human waste wafts in from Washington Street, settling over the rowhouses and businesses of Norristown's East Side. East Lafayette Street residents have come to know that outhouse aroma, and they scurry inside their homes, slamming doors and windows shut. Motorists close car windows and speed on. Pedestrians hold their noses. And speed up. For years, the inhabitants of this borough, seat of Montgomery County government, have put up with the odor of rotten eggs emanating from nearby industrial plants.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Fed up with petty crime, the all-night racket of beating drums, the smell of human waste and the sight of trampled flowers and grass, police and neighbors are losing patience with some of the anti-Wall Street protests around the U.S. In Oakland, Calif., police in riot gear fired tear gas and bean bags before daybreak yesterday to disperse about 170 protesters who had been camping in front of City Hall for the past two weeks, and 75...
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Meghan Barr, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Fed up with petty crime, the all-night racket of beating drums, the smell of human waste, and the sight of trampled flowers and grass, police and neighbors are losing patience with some of the anti-Wall Street demonstrations around the United States. In Oakland, Calif., police in riot gear fired tear gas and bean bags before daybreak Tuesday to disperse about 170 protesters who had been camping in front of City Hall for the last two weeks, and 75 people were arrested.
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NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE SMELL from the house next door was both nauseating and relentless. Janeen Mills had no idea what was causing it - maybe dog feces or a sewage pipe - but whatever it was, it was unbearable for her and her seven grandchildren. Moreover, Mills had lost hope that the landlord or any city agency would make the odor coming from 2730 N. 22nd St. stop. Then one night, she heard a noise outside her North Philly rowhouse. She went to the window and what she saw made her gag. Her neighbors were dumping human feces down the storm sewer.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
RULEE WILLIAMSON did something yesterday afternoon that he hasn't done in years. The 81-year-old stood on his North Philadelphia porch, huge smile on his face, and took a deep breath of fresh air. After a column chronicling how Williamson and his neighbors had long been tormented by the stench of urine and feces dumped by squatters at 3236 N. 27th St., the city finally cleaned and sealed the property Tuesday. "It's over," Williamson said. "Finally, it's over. " Over the years, many suggested that the family take matters into their own hands and board up the problem house.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
ALL RETIREES Rulee and Shirley Williamson want is to enjoy a cup of coffee on their porch without gagging on the stench of urine and feces dumped by the squatters next door. Now that it's cold outside, all their daughter, Shirley Wilson, wants is to stop worrying that one day the squatters will burn down her parents' home by illegally heating the property, which has no running water, electricity or front door. Either way, it's a bad situation for this North Philadelphia block of neat rowhouses where most homeowners have lived for more than 50 years.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
By John Hymers The saga of the Carnival Triumph and its toilets symbolizes the intractable problem of biological waste and the fragility of technological solutions. The natural world is a system of exchange. In nature, "waste" products remain part of the system, providing for the return of nutrients to the soil in one way or another. The many interlocking layers of nature's complex arrangement send the sun's energy upward from the soil to the apex predators, and then back down to the base, all the while swirling around plants, insects, birds, and small animals in a seemingly chaotic but intricately ordered dance.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Fed up with petty crime, the all-night racket of beating drums, the smell of human waste and the sight of trampled flowers and grass, police and neighbors are losing patience with some of the anti-Wall Street protests around the U.S. In Oakland, Calif., police in riot gear fired tear gas and bean bags before daybreak yesterday to disperse about 170 protesters who had been camping in front of City Hall for the past two weeks, and 75...
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Meghan Barr, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Fed up with petty crime, the all-night racket of beating drums, the smell of human waste, and the sight of trampled flowers and grass, police and neighbors are losing patience with some of the anti-Wall Street demonstrations around the United States. In Oakland, Calif., police in riot gear fired tear gas and bean bags before daybreak Tuesday to disperse about 170 protesters who had been camping in front of City Hall for the last two weeks, and 75 people were arrested.
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Water Commissioner Bernard Brunwasser says a new, privatized sludge plant in Southwest Philadelphia would reduce the human waste stored on site, require fewer diesel trucks to haul that waste, and eliminate the putrid smell that can extend more than a mile in any direction from under the Platt Bridge. What seems like an easy sell has been anything but because, in part, it would eliminate 60 union jobs at the city's current "biosolids" plant, a nice name for the not-so-nice mess that comes out of the city's wastewater.
NEWS
August 21, 2004
Someone ought to give a citation for meaness to the U.S. Park Service ranger who issued a ticket to a woman who had to act quickly when her little boy had waited as long as he could to answer nature's call. A woman and her 3-year-old son had just come out of the new Liberty Bell pavilion two weeks ago when the boy made clear he had to relieve himself. She tried to take him back inside, not knowing there weren't bathrooms in there. She stopped anyhow when she saw the sign barring her from entering.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Maybe it was the footage of a crying child looking lost and frail among the mass of hungry refugees. Or the vivid description of their new homes, sheets of plastic haphazardly spread across soggy fields where human waste is squashed into the mud. Whatever the jolt, people in Philadelphia and elsewhere across the country have in the last few days started to reach out to help the hordes of ethnic Albanians fleeing Kosovo. Americans still may barely be able to pronounce the name of this war-torn province of Serbia, but it doesn't seem to matter any more.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Darnetta Green-Mason has put up with a lot of stuff. Three buckets of stuff to be exact - found last weekend when she and other residents cleared debris from an overgrown lot on the corner of 49th and Reno streets, West Philadelphia. The stuff, originally found near a toppled, retired Port-O-Potty, has been out on the corner, uncovered, for the last six days. And you know what that means. "In this warm weather, you can really smell it," said Mason, 45, the local block captain who happens to live across the street.
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