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Humble Beginnings

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NEWS
July 14, 1999 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Paula Taylor Peebles has climbed from humble beginnings but has never lost touch with her North Philadelphia roots. A former welfare recipient who lived in public housing, Peebles now has three degrees and a successful career as the head of four nonprofit and two for-profit organizations devoted to low-income housing, child care and economic development. Her office is lined with awards and photos of her rubbing shoulders with such political notables as first lady Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | By Eileen Reinhard, Special to The Inquirer
An 18-year-old Newfield student was recognized yesterday as one of 30 students in the nation who won Horatio Alger scholarships. Lisa McCarville, a senior at Buena Regional High School, was given her $5,000 academic scholarship by Azie Taylor Morton, former treasurer of the United States. Morton also detailed her own humble beginnings and said, "Only in this country can a girl who picked cotton move up to become the woman who is here today. " Morton represented the Horatio Alger Association of America Inc., which sponsored the awards, and said the scholarship was a signal to McCarville "that the Horatio Alger Association wants to let you know you are an outstanding student and we expect you will achieve great heights.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gerald Carson, 90, an author of many books on American social history, died Sunday at Saint Mary Hospital in Langhorne. He was a resident of Newtown. A native of Carrollton, Ill., Mr. Carson received his bachelor of arts and master's degrees from the University of Illinois. He later moved to New York, where he worked as a reporter for the New York Herald before it became the Herald Tribune. Mr. Carson also worked at the Cosmopolitan Book Co. and went on to write copy for advertising agencies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012
IT WAS A curious scene: a school cafeteria full of girls, some wearing headscarves, learning the art of continental dining. They held their forks in their left hands, using the utensils to transfer sautéed brussels sprouts and orange-glazed chicken to their mouths - being careful to hold the tines down European-style. As they practiced, Faatimah Gamble, wife of legendary songwriter/producer Kenny Gamble, kept watch, handing one girl a lime-green folded cloth napkin and instructing another in the proper use of a knife.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fannie Buten, 111, one of the oldest people in the world and a member of the family that founded the M. Buten & Sons paint company, has died. Mrs. Buten died Friday of a stroke at Einstein at Elkins Park. She was the oldest person in Pennsylvania and one of the oldest in the world, according to a gerontology research group. A graveside service was held for her on Sunday at Mount Lebanon Cemetery in Collingdale. Mrs. Buten was the 37th-oldest person in the world, said Stephen Coles, director of the Gerontology Research Group at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | By Rashod D. Ollison, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Quincy Jones has packed a lot into his 67 years. Rising from humble beginnings, he has become a trumpeter, a composer and an arranger, then a music, film and television producer, an entrepreneur, and a philanthropist. Now, all of that has led to his latest honor - the annual Marian Anderson Award. "We couldn't be prouder of this selection," Mayor Street said as he made the announcement yesterday at a news conference at the Hotel Sofitel in Center City. "Mr. Jones' gifts have touched people nationally [and]
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
BIRD LOVERS UP A TREE OVER SURPLUS OF FEEDERS With streets named for orioles, bluebirds and a flock of other birds, it's obvious that folks in Laguna Beach, Calif., cherish their feathered friends. But things can go too far, even in the woodsy enclave that is Laguna Beach. That's what Bernie and Maria Rutkoski found out after neighbors complained about the number of bird feeders on their property. The problem - lots of it, apparently - is on neighboring properties.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
They came from rooms of power in City Hall and Harrisburg and from living rooms in the nearby Richard Allen Homes housing project. They came in suits and ties, in casual, open-necked shirts. They came by the thousands to a stone church in North Philadelphia to praise and to bury state Rep. Alphonso Deal. Among them were Mayor Goode and Gov. Casey, Edna Beatty, who had come to see a member of her church laid to rest, and Columbus Wilds, a West Philadelphia man who had never met Deal but believed he stood for "what is right and good.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Talk about humble beginnings. In 1682, when John and Sarah Roberts became the first family to settle down in what is now Maple Shade, they set about building a log cabin on their newly surveyed 267-acre plantation. And while they waited for the cabin to be completed, they spent their days and nights living in a cave on a steep bank of the Pennsauken Creek. It's doubtful the Robertses would face a similar housing crisis today, when Maple Shade is home to about 22,000 people living in 4,000 single-family homes and 5,000 apartments.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Two people with similar humble beginnings: one grows up to achieve great fame and riches, personally and professionally. The other barely scrapes out a meager existence in a drug-scarred slum. What is it about one person that drives him to excel, while another fails? Is it timing? Fate? Genetics? The answer, according to Dennis Kimbro, co-author of "Think and Grow Rich, A Black Choice," is none of these factors. He contends that successful people are dreamers, the people with a vision of what they want their lives to be. They are goal-oriented and motivated.
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REAL_ESTATE
October 13, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in a Northeast Philadelphia rowhouse, Tom Scannapieco never imagined that he would live in a multimillion-dollar condo tower overlooking Independence Hall - especially one he'd be building himself at 500 Walnut St. Scannapieco Development Corp. plans to break ground early next year on the $178 million 500 Walnut project, with condominiums starting at $2.5 million and going up to $17.61 million for the penthouse. Averaging more than 3,500 square feet, many of the units are full floors.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's fitting that a chunk of this 75th version of the NCAA tournament will be contested in Philadelphia. It was here, after all, on St. Patrick's Day 1939, that March Madness began with barely a nervous twitch. The 68-team basketball behemoth that now commands billion-dollar TV contracts, sells out domed football stadiums, and captivates millions of amateur and professional bracketeers debuted modestly at a sparsely occupied Palestra. That cold night, before a disappointing gathering of 3,500 and very little national notice, Villanova defeated Brown in the opener of a doubleheader that marked the dawn of what The Inquirer termed the "National Collegiate A.A. basketball championship.
NEWS
March 10, 2013 | By Laura Burke, Associated Press
ACCRA, Ghana - Often cast as the social conscience of the church, Ghana's Cardinal Peter Turkson is viewed by many as the top African contender for pope. The 64-year-old head of the Vatican's peace and justice office was widely credited with helping to avert violence after contested Ghanaian elections. He has aggressively fought African poverty, while disappointing many by hewing to the church's conservative line on condom use amid Africa's AIDS epidemic. Turkson's reputation as a man of peace took a hit recently when he showed a virulently anti-Islamic video, a move now seen as hurting his papal prospects.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012
IT WAS A curious scene: a school cafeteria full of girls, some wearing headscarves, learning the art of continental dining. They held their forks in their left hands, using the utensils to transfer sautéed brussels sprouts and orange-glazed chicken to their mouths - being careful to hold the tines down European-style. As they practiced, Faatimah Gamble, wife of legendary songwriter/producer Kenny Gamble, kept watch, handing one girl a lime-green folded cloth napkin and instructing another in the proper use of a knife.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
IF YOU were a friend of Gloria Mozil Simmons' and shared her curiosity about esoteric subjects like philosophy and religion, you might have been lucky enough to spend hours - often deep into the night - discussing such subjects. Her search for life's meaning eventually led her to the Jehovah's Witnesses, which offered her the truths she had always sought. And she wasn't just a member of the denomination. She pitched in with her customary energy and dedication, going door-to-door to spread the word and traveling extensively with the ministry.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge sentenced former Philadelphia police inspector Daniel Castro to five years in prison for conspiring to commit extortion, an outcome that stunned many of Castro's relatives Tuesday and caused his mother to burst into sobs. Castro, who pleaded guilty to his role in a scheme to use violence to collect a $90,000 debt from former business partner Wilson Encarnacion, was defiant and bitter as he spoke to reporters outside the courthouse. "When you think about it, I was a victim," Castro said.
NEWS
September 29, 2010 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fannie Buten, 111, one of the oldest people in the world and a member of the family that founded the M. Buten & Sons paint company, has died. Mrs. Buten died Friday of a stroke at Einstein at Elkins Park. She was the oldest person in Pennsylvania and one of the oldest in the world, according to a gerontology research group. A graveside service was held for her on Sunday at Mount Lebanon Cemetery in Collingdale. Mrs. Buten was the 37th-oldest person in the world, said Stephen Coles, director of the Gerontology Research Group at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine in Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fannie Buten, 111, one of the oldest people in the world and a member of the family that founded the M. Buten & Sons paint company, has died. Mrs. Buten died Friday of a stroke at Einstein at Elkins Park. She was the oldest person in Pennsylvania and one of the oldest in the world, according to a gerontology research group. A graveside service was held for her on Sunday at Mount Lebanon Cemetery in Collingdale. Mrs. Buten was the 37th-oldest person in the world, said Stephen Coles, director of the Gerontology Research Group at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine in Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 25, 2009 | FATIMAH ALI
IT'S A GOOD thing President Obama is using this week to rejuvenate in Martha's Vineyard, Mass. His vacation comes just as his lovefest with the media seems to be over. Although Hurricane Bill missed the island, several political storms have been brewing, not the least of which are the explosive town-hall meetings that have raged across the country. Both Pew and ABC News polls report that the president's approval ratings have dropped 10 points, and 37 percent of Americans appear to think that he's not doing a very good job. Some journalists, responding to his declining support, have dipped their pens in more critical ink. Sequestered at Blue Heron Farm, the president is trying to avoid the media, which might irritate journalists prickly about "access.
NEWS
May 1, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Anthony DeCecco is the wild-haired owner of Tennis Addiction Sports Club in Exton, and the president of the Greater Philadelphia Division of the U.S. Professional Tennis Association. The gregarious 48-year-old runs three benefit tennis tournaments each year, and one of them, the Camphill Pro-Am for Camphill Special School in Glenmoore, begins May 9 with a dinner ball at the Desmond Hotel in Malvern. "If you want to do something for a charity and really feel good about it, this is the one for you," DeCecco said of the two-day event, consisting of the ball and a tournament the next day at Valley Creek Park in East Whiteland.
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