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Humble Pie

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SPORTS
January 7, 2009 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
I'm not a picky eater. Never have been. I'll pretty much devour whatever ends up on my plate - within reason. Certain things are off limits. I've never liked cauliflower. Once, while working at a restaurant, someone offered me a goat's eyeball. It's supposedly a delicacy. I passed. And, frankly, I never developed a taste for humble pie. Yesterday, one of our Daily News cousins tried to serve me and a few others some crow. In his column, the venerable Bill Conlin wrote that it was time for all the Andy Reid bashers - and Conlin copped to being one of us - to admit we'd made a horrible mistake.
SPORTS
August 21, 2011 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - If the fallout from Michael Vick's GQ interview and the subsequent loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers prove anything, it's that the Eagles will be in the crosshairs. "That comes along with the territory," Vick said after Thursday night's 24-14 preseason defeat. "But we accept that challenge. It's not going to be easy. Each and every Sunday, it's not going to be easy. "This is a tough game, and every week you've got to bring your "A" game, and if you don't, you're going to be embarrassed.
SPORTS
October 10, 1994 | by Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
Flanked by security guards, eyes fixed straight ahead, Buddy Ryan shuffled off the field at Texas Stadium. What was left of the crowd gathered above the tunnel leading to the visitors' dressing room. There were boos and taunts as Ryan approached and just before he ducked out of sight, one Dallas fan dumped a bucket of popcorn on his head. Ryan never broke stride, jogging through the laughter and up the ramp behind his beaten Arizona Cardinals. The final score was Dallas 38, Arizona 3, Ryan's worst defeat as an NFL head coach.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | BY SARAKAY SMULLENS
The reaction to Princess Diana's death says as much, if not more, about us, our families of origin, the families we marry into and the dreams we have for the families we create, than it does about Diana. The time of life in which Diana died, the age between 30 and 40, is the old age of youth. It is the decade when the strong have found the courage to make changes in their lives, readdress dreams and goals, and do all in their power to pursue them. Men and women address these goals and dreams differently.
SPORTS
September 18, 2007
ST. LOUIS - You want positives? Here's one: Charlie Manuel is in great health. He took a stress test last night and passed. Then he took another one, and another one and another one, so by the end of the night - as Tony La Russa spoke ebulliently about "the best near-miss game he's ever been involved in" - the Phillies' manager sat slumped back behind a desk in the visitors' clubhouse, shirt soaked, wearing the look of a man whose parachute finally opened...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IT MAY BE good to be the king, but the king could use a little rest. On late Sunday afternoon, two-thirds through a 26-week tour, Michael York was waving Excalibur in Dallas, ending a two-week run as King Arthur in Lerner & Loewe's classic "Camelot. " Last night he was nearly 1,500 miles away, on stage at the Merriam Theater (250 S. Broad St.) sparring with Lancelot over the hand of Guenevere. At least York got to fly. As is the way with theatrical tours, the entire show was broken down Sunday in Texas, and "stuffed into trucks who drive pell-mell across the country," York said yesterday morning at the Rittenhouse Hotel.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the Grammy nominations were even announced, Kanye West went ahead and declared himself winner of the album of the year. Now, he's backing down. But only a little bit. "I actually haven't listened to Paul McCartney's album, I won't lie to you about that," he told MTV News. "I'm going to check it out. I'm going to make sure I feel like I should win. " In a backstage rant last week, West predicted that politics would keep him from walking away with the Grammy for his album Late Registration, saying it would be backlash for his public criticism of President Bush.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | By Mary Croke
There's a mural I drive by all the time in Germantown that makes me crazy. It covers the side of a two-story building, and in the middle of this big picture is an inspiring message in big black letters. And in the middle of the inspiring message is a (scre-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e - fingernail on blackboard) grammar mistake. I've learned to avert my eyes, but my mind still fills with violent fantasies of crossing out that wrong word and replacing it with the right one. In black. In big black letters.
SPORTS
February 11, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
When we last saw Darien Chavis, he was climbing out of a very deep hole. There was egg on his face, humble pie in his belly and more than a little pain in his heart. Chavis, a 5-11, 165-pound senior point guard at Engineering and Science High, made the mistake last summer of telling Terrance "T.T. " Stokes he would light up Simon Gratz and Stokes for 50 points this season. Try fewer than half of that. Try fewer than than half of half. Chavis scored seven points Jan. 6 in a 68-39 loss.
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NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Russ Bynum, Associated Press
SAVANNAH, Ga. - Watching Paula Deen's cooking show was a weekend ritual for Marilynne Wilson, who says she's furious at the Food Network for dumping the comfort-food queen after she acknowledged using racial slurs in the past. "I was shocked. I thought she'd get a fair trial," Wilson, a nurse from Jacksonville, Fla., said Saturday after stopping to buy souvenirs at the gift shop Deen owns next to her restaurant. "I think the Food Network jumped the gun. " A day after announcing that it is dropping Deen from its roster of celebrity cooks, the cable network was served heaping portions of Southern fried outrage by her fans.
SPORTS
October 31, 2011 | BY MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
ROB RYAN unsheathed his sword, planted the hilt in the ground at his feet and, with all of his considerable might, fell on it. The Eagles shredded Ryan's defense last night for 495 yards, almost 200 more than the Cowboys' average as the NFC's stingiest, and 21 more points than usual. The 34-7 final actually might hide exactly how well Andy Reid and his Eagles prepared to carve up the Cowboys. "It all comes down to coaching," Ryan said. "Andy Reid was reading my mail. He kicked my ass. I've got to be smarter than this.
SPORTS
August 21, 2011 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - If the fallout from Michael Vick's GQ interview and the subsequent loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers prove anything, it's that the Eagles will be in the crosshairs. "That comes along with the territory," Vick said after Thursday night's 24-14 preseason defeat. "But we accept that challenge. It's not going to be easy. Each and every Sunday, it's not going to be easy. "This is a tough game, and every week you've got to bring your "A" game, and if you don't, you're going to be embarrassed.
SPORTS
January 7, 2009 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
I'm not a picky eater. Never have been. I'll pretty much devour whatever ends up on my plate - within reason. Certain things are off limits. I've never liked cauliflower. Once, while working at a restaurant, someone offered me a goat's eyeball. It's supposedly a delicacy. I passed. And, frankly, I never developed a taste for humble pie. Yesterday, one of our Daily News cousins tried to serve me and a few others some crow. In his column, the venerable Bill Conlin wrote that it was time for all the Andy Reid bashers - and Conlin copped to being one of us - to admit we'd made a horrible mistake.
SPORTS
September 18, 2007
ST. LOUIS - You want positives? Here's one: Charlie Manuel is in great health. He took a stress test last night and passed. Then he took another one, and another one and another one, so by the end of the night - as Tony La Russa spoke ebulliently about "the best near-miss game he's ever been involved in" - the Phillies' manager sat slumped back behind a desk in the visitors' clubhouse, shirt soaked, wearing the look of a man whose parachute finally opened...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IT MAY BE good to be the king, but the king could use a little rest. On late Sunday afternoon, two-thirds through a 26-week tour, Michael York was waving Excalibur in Dallas, ending a two-week run as King Arthur in Lerner & Loewe's classic "Camelot. " Last night he was nearly 1,500 miles away, on stage at the Merriam Theater (250 S. Broad St.) sparring with Lancelot over the hand of Guenevere. At least York got to fly. As is the way with theatrical tours, the entire show was broken down Sunday in Texas, and "stuffed into trucks who drive pell-mell across the country," York said yesterday morning at the Rittenhouse Hotel.
NEWS
March 28, 2006 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Morgan Spurlock, whose prizewinning film Super Size Me chronicled his 30 days on a burger-and-fries diet, ate some humble pie yesterday. The author and filmmaker apologized to students and officials at Hatboro-Horsham High School for using the term retarded during an assembly Friday. He said he used the word in reference to himself when he had difficulty fielding a question. "It was the wrong place at the wrong time, a matter of circumstances, I think. It was never my intention to offend anyone," Spurlock, 35, said in a telephone interview while on an East Coast tour.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the Grammy nominations were even announced, Kanye West went ahead and declared himself winner of the album of the year. Now, he's backing down. But only a little bit. "I actually haven't listened to Paul McCartney's album, I won't lie to you about that," he told MTV News. "I'm going to check it out. I'm going to make sure I feel like I should win. " In a backstage rant last week, West predicted that politics would keep him from walking away with the Grammy for his album Late Registration, saying it would be backlash for his public criticism of President Bush.
NEWS
August 3, 2001
"If we're an arrogant nation, [others] will resent us. . . . That's why we've got to be humble and yet project strength in a way that promotes freedom. " What wise words those were, spoken by someone who obviously had a vision for how the United States could lead in an interconnected world. The assessment was uttered by none other than George W. Bush, presidential candidate, during a debate with Al Gore. It is based on a truth that applies in world affairs as much as in school yards: Bullies make enemies, not friends.
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