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Humor

ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Something about the sport of golf - the act of whacking a little white ball with a stick - inspires humor. Comedian Tim Conway seized on this fact about five years ago and came up with Dorf on Golf, a collection of slapstick skits that take place on the links. The success of Dorf overshadowed all comers, including a 1988 release from Paramount Home Video called Thom Sharp's Golf: I Hate This Game, but now Sharp's tape is getting a second chance. This month, Paramount is dusting it off for re-release (perhaps with an eye to Father's Day next month)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Whatever else it will be remembered for, the desperately unfunny What Planet Are You From? has earned its footnote in the annals of pop culture as the first sex comedy of the Viagra Age. The story of an alien from the "far reaches of the universe" sent to Earth to procreate with a woman, thereby assuring the future of his race (highly evolved eunuchs who wear nicely tailored suits), this vacuum-sealed Mike Nichols-directed dud can be read as some kind of fuzzy-headed allegory about that Dole-endorsed wonder drug from Pfizer Pharmaceuticals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Major League became something of a surprise summer hit five years ago, the hapless Cleveland Indians were the butt of as many jokes as the city they represented. But now, as teams break spring-training camp for the new season, sensible baseball analysts are doing the unthinkable and speaking respectfully of the Tribe as a contender. Fact, of course, deviates from fiction as we return to the floundering Indians in the early innings of David Ward's Major League II. As an act of larceny that shamelessly ran the same comic basepaths as Bull Durham, Major League seemed right up there with a double steal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | By Michael McGettigan, Special to the Daily News
If you hate comedy clubs, you'll love the No Respect for the Human Condition players and their latest show, "The Next to Last Temptation of Christ," now playing upstairs at Moriarty's in Center City. The setting is similar to many comedy clubs that have sprouted on upper floors around town: an improvised performing space with 75 seats next to a tiny bar; a spiffy, 25-to-30-something crowd, and the mandatory uptempo rock and funk before showtime. But "The Next to Last Temptation" is a far cry from the bleep-happy crotch/drug shtick that passes for humor at many comedy clubs.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas Frazier is waiting on the corner, a red-nozzled spray bottle of Windex in his pocket and a wide smile on his face, studying people on the sidewalk, his mind on making them laugh. And on making some money. This warm Friday, Frazier fixes his gaze on a tall guy in black suede shoes who looks as though he has change to spare. As the man nears, Frazier matches his pace. Before he can turn away, Frazier is on a roll. The words rush out. "You know who I am, right?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The 1991 edition of Rosenfeld Gallery's annual fantasy and humor show favors three-dimensional work more than it has in the past, but otherwise it looks familiar. Some of the artists are merely amusing, while others, such as newcomer Harry Krizan, use humor as a vehicle to deliver a serious message. Once again the show is built around the drawings and sculptures of Robert Nelson, an artist whose fantasies often deal with war and flying - in any event, he likes to put wings on things.
LIVING
June 16, 2000 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
The family who adopts Janetta, 13, will be blessed with a child who has high goals, a wonderful sense of humor, and a strong, assertive personality. She wants to be the first African American president of the United States. She says she feels her people need a lot of help, and she wants to be the one to give it. She has an average IQ and is in sixth grade. She learns best when information is presented visually, and her grades are often above average. There is abuse and neglect in her background.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1996 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Folk veteran Joan Baez showed that she was more than just an icon at her Friday night Electric Factory performance. She managed to present the music's history and her three-decade career with a sense of relevance and a dose of humor. While many of her younger, would-be counterparts use folk's spare structures as a backdrop for trite, journal-entry confessions, Baez succeeds at transcending the coffeehouse and its Hallmark card PC sentiments. For an hour and a half, she brought the genre back to its original purpose: telling a good story.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
Fans of Comedy Central's animated "South Park" had their cheesypoofs in an uproar over an April Fools' joke played on them Wednesday night. It was on that night that Comedy Central was supposed to air a highly anticipated "South Park" in which the character Cartman's father was to be revealed. The series had been building up to that big moment for the last few episodes. Everything appeared normal at the top of the show, with clips from previous episodes setting up the big revelation.
LIVING
April 14, 2000 | By Bo Niles, FOR THE INQUIRER
Southerners are known for their hospitality. Most love to entertain and are great storytellers. Like the British, they embrace eccentricity, don't mind "shabby chic," and have a wry sense of humor. They are also ardent collectors, invigorating their homes with the things they love, especially heirloom silver, ceramics, photographs of friends and family, and relics of their shared past. "Southerners cherish reminders of struggle and survival, reminders of families that have gone before, and [they]
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