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Humor

NEWS
September 23, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Perhaps it's not too surprising that convicted murderer and rapist Alexander Keaton has a sense of humor that borders on the morbid. Keaton, 33, of Ridge Avenue near Spring Garden Street, broke out laughing yesterday when a Common Pleas Court jury sentenced him to die for strangling Sherrell Ann Hall, 31, on Jan. 7, 1993. This came a day after the confident Keaton, certain he was going to be found innocent, had to cancel celebratory dinner plans with his girlfriend. "He was laughing out loud, like it was a big joke," one of Keaton's two rape victims said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In his production of Don Juan at the Cheltenham Center for the Arts, director Ken Marini does his best to mitigate the play's problems with imaginative, visually interesting, theatrically impressive staging. With this approach and by playing the play's humor probably more broadly than Moliere intended, he wrings about as much fun as possible from this atypical Moliere piece. But as enjoyable as the production can be, there is always the play. For good reason, Don Juan is not one of the great French writer's most popular works.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | BY DAVE BARRY
Recently I received a very disturbing item in the mail, an item representing such a grave threat, not just to this nation, but to the entire Free World, that I think I might be able to make some real money off it. It is a brochure from the House of Humour and Satire in Gabrovo, Bulgaria. I swear I am not making this up. There really is a House of Humour and Satire in Bulgaria. You can even visit it. "The House welcomes gladly numerous guests," the brochure states. "They are welcomed by the bronze sculptures of Charlie Chaplain (sic)
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
Kathryn Selby, a pianist who will play a concert with the Endellion String Quartet at Bryn Mawr College on Oct. 15, is not sure if she is a musician/ scholar or a scholar/musician, but either designation fits. An Australian, Selby moved to Philadelphia in 1977, when she was 15, to study performance at the Curtis Institute of Music. She then made the Main Line her academic stomping grounds from 1979 to 1983, squeezing four years of academic work at Bryn Mawr College between her two stints of piano study at Curtis.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1992 | By Robert G. Seidenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is the Alaska setting that makes Tom Bodette's fictional town of End of the Road a little bit different from home-town America in general. Not too many of us non-Alaskans run into moose when we drive to a friend's house. Not too many of us fish for a living or enjoy recreational clamming. And not too many of us are directly threatened when massive amounts of oil spill out of a tanker. Otherwise, a lot of us go to graduation dances, buy new cars, hunt, move to new towns, and feel the pressures and the love of family life.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Donald Scott, Special to The Inquirer
If all of the humorous energy at Beaver College's Little Theater could have been pumped into a giant balloon over the weekend, there would have been a fantastic explosion. A team of clowns with brightly colored faces, decked out in the flashiest, funkiest attire, raced around the theater and onto the stage tickling the funny bones of the audience. The silly, be-bopping critters had one goal in mind: to make people chortle. And they did it with flying colors. Whether it was smacking the buttocks of an unsuspecting cohort or trying to give another a dental root canal with a giant sword, the end result was laughter.
NEWS
October 30, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Agnes and Tobias may not be very happy, but the central characters of Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance seem secure as they approach 60 in their nicely ordered, upper-class existence. Oh, they have to deal with Agnes' alcoholic, outrageously outspoken sister Claire, who lives with them, hates her sister, and is not particularly secretive about her love for Tobias. And their disappointing daughter Julia has left her fourth husband and is coming home (as she apparently does during all her separations)
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes, Officer Winfred Hunter and his colleagues from the Philadelphia Police Department invented what-if situations. They'd take turns with questions that tested their ability to think quickly and escape the worst of perils. The hypothetical situations came in animated conversations at work and off- duty. And in these discussions - just like on the job - Win Hunter typically would come up with responses that showed him to be an even-tempered, smooth-talking pro. The basic philosophy went like this, the officers said: Avoid stupid situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Are you available for sex?" a woman asks a man in Beth Henley's futuristic comedy, Signature. "No, I'm under surveillance," the man replies. So, you might want to know, who's watching him? What did he do to be watched? What does it mean to be watched? But you'll not find the answers here, simply because Henley doesn't provide any. The Los Angeles of 2052 in which this mildly humorous, quite pointless comedy is set is a frustratingly vague, not very fascinating place. The only reason to visit it is to appreciate the well-acted, spirited production at Passage Theatre.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
David Baum, former circus clown, thought it was funny that he - a man - was invited to speak to members of the Women's Health Network at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County about the role of humor in health. Baum was the keynote speaker Monday at the opening of an art exhibit at the hospital's Pavilion Gallery marking Women's History Month and the sixth anniversary of the health network, which provides clinical and counseling services to women. The exhibit, naturally, is called "Women as Heroines of Humor.
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