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Humpback Whales

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NEWS
December 31, 1995 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Winter whale-watchers don't necessarily have to go to the Caribbean or Mexico's Sea of Cortez to see the big mammals. Some juvenile humpback whales have taken to leaving the southward migration and wintering near the relatively mild and food-rich mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, according to the Virginia Marine Science Museum. The museum began whale-watching trips off the coast of Virginia Beach, Va., last week and plans to continue them five days a week through March 30, or until the whales migrate from the area.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | By Scott Benarde, FOR THE INQUIRER
The sea is calm; perhaps one- or two-foot swells. The 40-foot-long female humpback whale and her calf are cruising just off the port bow of our small launch. So are a couple of desire-filled males. We are so close we can see the barnacles on their slender, snow-white pectoral fins. We are eager for a close encounter of the third kind - face to face, so to speak, in the water - for that is what this trip promises. But we won't be getting in the water with this lot. Too much action.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Larisa Kuntz, Special to The Inquirer
The strange wailing and groaning sounds that frequently come from Linda Henderson's fifth grade classroom are not indications of lament. Instead, they are the taped songs of humpback whales. The songs are part of a whale study program that is being taught at the Quarry Hill Elementary School in Lower Makefield. One recent morning, Henderson's class of about 20 children sat in what Henderson dubbed the "whale corner," a section of the classroom plastered with posters depicting species of whales, a fishing net entwining paper mache whales and dioramas exhibiting killer whales.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1986 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
If you're about to go around the bend because you can't figure out why humpback whales sing, take a mental break and catch marine biologist Peter Tyack's talk at Swarthmore College's Kirby Hall, Route 320, Swarthmore, at 4:30 p.m. He'll answer that heavy question and more. It's a free event and the public is invited. Info: 447-7000. FARAWAY PLACES The fabled land of Tibet and the legend of Shangri-La are the subjects of a lecture at the Academy of Natural Sciences, 19th and the Parkway.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James Augustine McGann 3d, 73, of Horsham, a retired business owner who was an avid photographer of whales, died Saturday at the Artman Home in Ambler. Mr. McGann was born in Philadelphia and reared in Drexel Hill, where he graduated from Upper Darby High School. During World War II, he was a first lieutenant in the Army, seeing action in the South Pacific. After service, he went to work at Globe Gear Co. in Fort Washington, a company founded by his grandfather. "He started in the washroom and worked his way up to chairman and chief executive officer," said a daughter, Susan M. Dunswell.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
"We saw whales!" yelled youngsters and oldsters alike as they disembarked from the Dolphin IV's mid-Saturday trip out Cape Cod Bay into the Atlantic Ocean. Stepping off the gangplank onto MacMillan Wharf, a smiling woman cautioned those waiting to board the sunset whale-watch cruise: "Take your Dramamine. " "Yeah," agreed several who followed her. "It was rough out there. But we saw whales!" During the 19th century, dozens of weather-beaten wooden whaling ships docked here.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | By Russell Wild
"Is it not illogical to hunt a species to extinction?" asks the always rational Mr. Spock in Star Trek IV. Indeed, it is highly illogical. So the pluckiest platoon in the Federation zaps back to the highly illogical 1980s to save two humpback whales. The Earth is saved too. Kirk falls in love. Uhura's earphones crackle. Scotty fears there's not enough power. And McCoy frets about everything. So much for the movie. It's loads of fun. But what about the whales? Do they face extinction?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1986 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
FRI FOURTH Some people might think that poking fun at nuns is a lot of nonsense. But Dan Goggin thinks otherwise. He says nuns are the biggest fans of his nun- centered musical comedy, which he calls "Nunsense. " About five New Jersey nuns who produce a fund-raising talent show at their convent, the comedy opens a limited Philadephia run tonight at 8 at the Society Hill Playhouse, 507 S. 8th St. Goggin, a product of Catholic schools, attended a seminary for a year. He wrote the book, music and lyrics for the show, which also is running in New York City.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was in June 1984, off the coast of Nova Scotia, that I saw them for the first and last time. I was aboard the Gazela of Philadelphia, a century-old tall ship making its wooden way toward a huge celebration in Quebec. I had pulled the 4-to-8 watch on a morning as cold and gray as battleship steel. Dawn had just broken when I spotted them off the starboard bow, through the mist: two humpback whales rolling along in tandem. I touched the shoulder of the other shivering soul on bow watch and pointed to them.
SPORTS
May 16, 2011
WHEN YOU are a sports journalist, the games have a way of guiding your time/space continuum. Certain life events become less associated with actual dates and more connected to certain sporting events. In all honesty, I can't tell you much of anything about what I did on Thanksgiving last year, but in 1994 I had turkey, salmon and reindeer sausage at the Anchorage Hilton. I was in Alaska to cover Villanova at The Great Alaska Shootout. A year later on Thanksgiving, I went on my first whale watch in Lahaina Bay, in Maui.
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SPORTS
May 16, 2011
WHEN YOU are a sports journalist, the games have a way of guiding your time/space continuum. Certain life events become less associated with actual dates and more connected to certain sporting events. In all honesty, I can't tell you much of anything about what I did on Thanksgiving last year, but in 1994 I had turkey, salmon and reindeer sausage at the Anchorage Hilton. I was in Alaska to cover Villanova at The Great Alaska Shootout. A year later on Thanksgiving, I went on my first whale watch in Lahaina Bay, in Maui.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James Augustine McGann 3d, 73, of Horsham, a retired business owner who was an avid photographer of whales, died Saturday at the Artman Home in Ambler. Mr. McGann was born in Philadelphia and reared in Drexel Hill, where he graduated from Upper Darby High School. During World War II, he was a first lieutenant in the Army, seeing action in the South Pacific. After service, he went to work at Globe Gear Co. in Fort Washington, a company founded by his grandfather. "He started in the washroom and worked his way up to chairman and chief executive officer," said a daughter, Susan M. Dunswell.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Winter whale-watchers don't necessarily have to go to the Caribbean or Mexico's Sea of Cortez to see the big mammals. Some juvenile humpback whales have taken to leaving the southward migration and wintering near the relatively mild and food-rich mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, according to the Virginia Marine Science Museum. The museum began whale-watching trips off the coast of Virginia Beach, Va., last week and plans to continue them five days a week through March 30, or until the whales migrate from the area.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | By Scott Benarde, FOR THE INQUIRER
The sea is calm; perhaps one- or two-foot swells. The 40-foot-long female humpback whale and her calf are cruising just off the port bow of our small launch. So are a couple of desire-filled males. We are so close we can see the barnacles on their slender, snow-white pectoral fins. We are eager for a close encounter of the third kind - face to face, so to speak, in the water - for that is what this trip promises. But we won't be getting in the water with this lot. Too much action.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was in June 1984, off the coast of Nova Scotia, that I saw them for the first and last time. I was aboard the Gazela of Philadelphia, a century-old tall ship making its wooden way toward a huge celebration in Quebec. I had pulled the 4-to-8 watch on a morning as cold and gray as battleship steel. Dawn had just broken when I spotted them off the starboard bow, through the mist: two humpback whales rolling along in tandem. I touched the shoulder of the other shivering soul on bow watch and pointed to them.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Larisa Kuntz, Special to The Inquirer
The strange wailing and groaning sounds that frequently come from Linda Henderson's fifth grade classroom are not indications of lament. Instead, they are the taped songs of humpback whales. The songs are part of a whale study program that is being taught at the Quarry Hill Elementary School in Lower Makefield. One recent morning, Henderson's class of about 20 children sat in what Henderson dubbed the "whale corner," a section of the classroom plastered with posters depicting species of whales, a fishing net entwining paper mache whales and dioramas exhibiting killer whales.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
"We saw whales!" yelled youngsters and oldsters alike as they disembarked from the Dolphin IV's mid-Saturday trip out Cape Cod Bay into the Atlantic Ocean. Stepping off the gangplank onto MacMillan Wharf, a smiling woman cautioned those waiting to board the sunset whale-watch cruise: "Take your Dramamine. " "Yeah," agreed several who followed her. "It was rough out there. But we saw whales!" During the 19th century, dozens of weather-beaten wooden whaling ships docked here.
NEWS
May 20, 1988 | By ROBERTA W. SHELL, Daily News Staff Writer
Are killer whales your cup of tea? How about bird-watching? Or trains? Or chocolate? Or African giraffes? Opera? Travel companies these days are arranging customized tours for just about any special interest out there, whether it's a place, an animal species, a type of food or a mode of transportation. Seasoned travelers think nothing of flying around the world, or setting out after an Arctic wolf, or chasing down a peregrine falcon, all in search of an experience tailor-made to their sense of curiosity and/or adventure.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | By Russell Wild
"Is it not illogical to hunt a species to extinction?" asks the always rational Mr. Spock in Star Trek IV. Indeed, it is highly illogical. So the pluckiest platoon in the Federation zaps back to the highly illogical 1980s to save two humpback whales. The Earth is saved too. Kirk falls in love. Uhura's earphones crackle. Scotty fears there's not enough power. And McCoy frets about everything. So much for the movie. It's loads of fun. But what about the whales? Do they face extinction?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1986 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
If you're about to go around the bend because you can't figure out why humpback whales sing, take a mental break and catch marine biologist Peter Tyack's talk at Swarthmore College's Kirby Hall, Route 320, Swarthmore, at 4:30 p.m. He'll answer that heavy question and more. It's a free event and the public is invited. Info: 447-7000. FARAWAY PLACES The fabled land of Tibet and the legend of Shangri-La are the subjects of a lecture at the Academy of Natural Sciences, 19th and the Parkway.
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