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Hunger Games

NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Martha Waggoner, Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. — Fans of The Hunger Games are turning up in North Carolina, seeking out places where the movie was shot, from old-growth forests to an abandoned mill town. And the tourism industry is prepared to cash in on them, with everything from hotel packages and zipline tours to reenactments of scenes from the film and lessons in survival skills. The movie, which led the box office for its first four weeks and had already earned more than a half-billion dollars worldwide, is based on a best-selling book about a post-apocalyptic world where teenagers compete to the death in fighting games.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Catherine Laughlin, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ada Arroyo was cleaning her house and rummaging through storage, when there, deep in a box from her teen days, she stumbled upon her bow and arrow. The discovery sparked memories of settling into a steady stance, bow drawn — the flight path lethally targeted. "Shooting is very meditative and psychological," said Arroyo, 36, who recently returned to the sport. "Because you need to focus so much in setting up a shot, you feel a sense of calm. " At B&A Archery in the Tacony section, Arroyo was among 15 archers firing arrows across the 50-foot range, while another dozen or so enthusiasts were milling about.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dick Clark, who died Wednesday at 82 of a heart attack, has been cremated, rep Paul Shefrin tells USA Today. Entertainment Tonight reports the ashes will be scattered in the Pacific Ocean, but Shefrin says Clark's family had not yet decided what to do with them. Plans for a public memorial hadn't been finalized. Simon Cowell: Not gay Simon Cowell, whose sexuality has been the subject of not a few gossip items, tells biographer Tom Bower in a new book he is straight.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Scott Holleran
For four consecutive weekends, the most popular movie in America has been one depicting a government contest in which children kill children. The Hunger Games, based on a dystopian series of young-adult novels by Suzanne Collins, recently broke the $500 million mark in worldwide box office receipts. What gets people into movie theaters is hard to tell. But the film version of The Hunger Games is appealing to more than the books' chiefly young, female fan base, drawing boys and adults as well.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | Freelance
By Paul F. Bradley From my house, I could hear the wailing start every Saturday at 8 a.m. It penetrated the walls, growing louder with each wave. By 9, it was loud enough to prevent any further sleep. By 10, it was deafening. Was it a battle reenactment? Perhaps M. Night Shyamalan was filming in the area? Hardly. It was just the sound of crazed parents screaming as their 6-year-olds played soccer. One day, I walked over to the sports complex, drawn by the shrieking.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | INQUIRER STAFF
Film fans are still forking over for The Hunger Games, which took in $33.5 million to lead the box office for a third straight weekend. According to studio estimates Sunday, The Hunger Games raised its domestic total to $302.8 million and easily topped the American Pie sequel American Reunion and a 3-D version of the blockbuster Titanic. Both newcomers opened solidly - American Reunion pulled in $21.5 million, while Titanic in 3-D reeled in $17.4 million over the weekend, raising its domestic take to $25.7 million since opening Wednesday.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | Choose one .
The Hunger Games was the top film for a second weekend in the United States and Canada, taking in $61.1 million in ticket sales. The movie, about teenagers forced to fight to the death on live television, has taken in $251 million since it opened March 23, making it the year's top-grossing film. The Wrath of the Titans made its debut in second place with $34.2 million. Demand for The Hunger Games has sustained a 22 percent increase in movie attendance this year and a 19 percent rise in ticket sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE has become confused by the term "racism. " Being a racist once meant that you viewed people of a specific race as inferior and did something to either harm them or hinder their advancement. Being a racist was worse than being prejudiced because it held with it a certain power to affect lives. In our current fractured society, however, you don't actually have to act like a racist to be labeled as such - you merely have to bring race into the discussion. Over the past week, people have been accused of being racist for pointing out that George Zimmerman shot Trayvon Martin because he was black.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hunger Games killed, destroyed, folded, spindled, and mutilated at the weekend box office. Studio guesses say opening night was the fifth-best debut ever. Since the top four were all Harry Potter or Twilight sequels, Hunger is the top non-sequel opener ever! When all the arrows had fallen Sunday night, Hunger , at $155 million (almost twice the $80 mils it cost), had scored the third-best opening weekend ever. Now you can buy your Hunger Games hunter-grrrl shirt dress and matching lunch box and join your friends in Hunger Games -inspired nonsense, knowing millions are doing the same.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Last week, late one morning on a break from class, Emily Ansara Baines could be found seated at a table in the cafeteria of the Los Angeles-area school where she works as a substitute teacher. She was not eating Mockingjay flatbread crackers, or Prim's basil-wrapped goat cheese balls, or Rue's roasted parsnips, although she could tell you how to make them if you asked. Baines is the author of The Unofficial Hunger Games Cookbook (Adams Media, $19.95), a food-centric fan's tribute to the mega-selling Suzanne Collins trilogy.
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