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Hunting License

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SPORTS
July 18, 1993 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The recent heat wave probably made fall hunting seem a long way off. But it isn't too soon for Pennsylvania sportsmen to begin thinking about the licenses they will need to hunt later this year. General hunting and fur-taking licenses for the 1993-94 hunting seasons went on sale July 1. The Pennsylvania Game Commission is urging hunters to buy their regular licenses early, so that they can have enough time to apply for an antlerless deer license or purchase a muzzleloader stamp.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Montgomery County commissioners put $10,000 toward the cause of gun safety yesterday, announcing a program through which anyone applying for a gun permit or a hunting license here will be able to buy a gun lock at the same time. The program, which should take effect in about a month, aims to improve gun safety in the county by making it more convenient for gun owners to buy locks for their weapons, Commissioner James W. Maza said at a news conference in Norristown. "This is not about gun control; it is about gun safety," Maza said.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | By Rachel Smolkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In an area known for its wide, open spaces, one hunter decided to aim his sights in a subdivision yesterday, police said. The police and state Game Commission officials weren't pleased. Lloyd Blevins, 45, of Toughkenamon, Chester County, parked his truck on the first block of Eagle Way in the Watersfield development about 2:30 p.m.. Police say he got out and shot a deer that stood about 120 feet from a house. Then he dragged the deer to his truck. His hunting license was invalid, he did not wear orange on his head, and he moved the deer without tagging it, police said.
NEWS
December 2, 1996 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Along with the thousands of trained and licensed hunters who will take to the fields and woods today for the opening of deer-hunting season, a handful of poachers will also aim their sights. For Mike Doherty, an official with the Pennsylvania Game Commission, the long hours needed to crack down on illegal hunters begin this week. Equipped with night-vision goggles and citation forms, Doherty will take to the woods, too. "It's important people know how to distinguish between a poacher and a hunter," he said.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | From Bill Tammeus, Kansas City Star
BILL'S WORLD After he voted, President Bush went shopping, picking up a hunting license, fishing reel and seven music tapes. He really must have needed the stuff. It was too late to boost the economy to help him. The Electoral College, which really chooses the president, votes Dec. 14. Of course, by then the chances improve that the winner may be Kriss Kringle. Votes by members of the Electoral College aren't officially counted until Jan. 6. We may not be married to the winner by then but the church will have been rented and the organist hired.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | By Christina Asquith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
DiFilippo's General Store is here to stay - at least for now. Four months ago, Lennie DiFilippo and some of his lifelong customers braced themselves to say goodbye to the 77-year-old general store, one of the oldest family-owned businesses in the area. But now DiFilippo has a new spring in his step. Although the family is tight-lipped about specific plans, he recently peeled away the "Going Out of Business" sign. Renovations are under way. And DiFilippo is spreading the word to his customers.
SPORTS
August 4, 1996 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Pennsylvania Game Commission's 17-month attempt to gain legislative approval to raise the cost of hunting licenses continues to inch along. State Rep. Bruce Smith (R., York County), chairman of the House Game and Fisheries Committee, announced Monday that he was circulating two "working drafts" of legislation to boost license fees. An aide to Smith said that the drafts were not formal bills and that their provisions were not "etched in stone. " The drafts are intended to generate discussion on the part of lawmakers and sportsmen.
SPORTS
August 1, 1993 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you want to hunt antlerless deer in Pennsylvania this fall, tomorrow is an important day for you. That's when county treasurers around the state will begin accepting antlerless license applications - by mail only - from Pennsylvania residents. (Applications from nonresidents will be accepted beginning Aug. 16.) In years past, the application date for residents was the first Monday in October. But this year, the Pennsylvania Game Commission pushed up the date to give bowhunters the opportunity to apply because archery season opens Oct. 2. Under new regulations that take effect this year, an archer must have a county-specific antlerless license to pursue antlerless deer.
SPORTS
November 20, 1994 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The New Jersey Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife says it must raise the cost of hunting and fishing licenses if it is to avert a budget deficit in 1996. A total of 26 licenses and permits would be affected by the proposed increases, said Bob Itchmoney, assistant director of the division. He said the higher fees would be enough to fund the agency up to the year 2000, and that no additional increases would be needed before then. The division wants to raise the cost of a resident hunting license from $22 to $28.50, and the fee for a resident fishing license from $16.50 to $22.50.
SPORTS
April 21, 1996 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Number crunching. Economists do it. Baseball statisticians do it. Wildlife biologists do it, too. And if they want to do a good job of crunching, they need to start with good numbers. While information on some game species, such as deer and wild turkeys, is abundant when wildlife agencies estimate harvests and make decisions involving hunting seasons and bag limits, that is not the case for many migratory game birds. Now, in response, Pennsylvania has created a migratory game-bird hunting license, which will provide the names and addresses of hunters so biologists can gather data through hunter surveys.
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NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
David Manilla, Michael Marino, and Robert Monestero. If this hunting party had a motto, it would be "Hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil. " Too bad only one of them, Manilla, is scheduled to be sentenced Friday morning for the November shooting death of Barry Groh. Manilla has pleaded guilty to two felony counts of illegal firearms possession and no contest to a misdemeanor charge of involuntary manslaughter. He faces 121/2 to 25 years in prison. To call Groh's death in Bucks County a hunting accident would be too generous.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It is no secret that many North Jersey residents are leaving for greener and less populated acres of South Jersey. That includes black bears. "Bears are coming back," said Patrick Carr, a wildlife biologist who heads the black-bear project for the state Bureau of Wildlife Management. "And they're getting into areas where they haven't been before. " How often South Jersey residents cross paths with the shy, black-furred mammals and whether bears are back to stay could depend on the outcome of a battle brewing over a proposal that would open the first black-bear hunting season since 1970.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Montgomery County commissioners put $10,000 toward the cause of gun safety yesterday, announcing a program through which anyone applying for a gun permit or a hunting license here will be able to buy a gun lock at the same time. The program, which should take effect in about a month, aims to improve gun safety in the county by making it more convenient for gun owners to buy locks for their weapons, Commissioner James W. Maza said at a news conference in Norristown. "This is not about gun control; it is about gun safety," Maza said.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | By Christina Asquith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
DiFilippo's General Store is here to stay - at least for now. Four months ago, Lennie DiFilippo and some of his lifelong customers braced themselves to say goodbye to the 77-year-old general store, one of the oldest family-owned businesses in the area. But now DiFilippo has a new spring in his step. Although the family is tight-lipped about specific plans, he recently peeled away the "Going Out of Business" sign. Renovations are under way. And DiFilippo is spreading the word to his customers.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Five or six years ago, Marjorie Zerweck says, she could count 16 or 18 deer using the salt lick or eating the corn that she puts out in her backyard. Now, she says, there may be one or two. "We don't have the deer we used to have," said Zerweck, who owns about seven acres in Middletown Township, Delaware County. Those who have collided with a buck on the highway or whose shrubs have been munched by deer might challenge her assertion, but statistics bear her out. After years of hand-wringing and heated debate by officials and residents over the proliferation of deer in the Philadelphia suburbs, both hunting totals and deer-density estimates provide strong evidence that the herd is being thinned out. "We think we're making progress," said Bob Boyd, assistant director of wildlife management for the state Game Commission, whose job it is to create a proper balance between people and wildlife.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | By Rachel Smolkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In an area known for its wide, open spaces, one hunter decided to aim his sights in a subdivision yesterday, police said. The police and state Game Commission officials weren't pleased. Lloyd Blevins, 45, of Toughkenamon, Chester County, parked his truck on the first block of Eagle Way in the Watersfield development about 2:30 p.m.. Police say he got out and shot a deer that stood about 120 feet from a house. Then he dragged the deer to his truck. His hunting license was invalid, he did not wear orange on his head, and he moved the deer without tagging it, police said.
NEWS
December 2, 1996 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Along with the thousands of trained and licensed hunters who will take to the fields and woods today for the opening of deer-hunting season, a handful of poachers will also aim their sights. For Mike Doherty, an official with the Pennsylvania Game Commission, the long hours needed to crack down on illegal hunters begin this week. Equipped with night-vision goggles and citation forms, Doherty will take to the woods, too. "It's important people know how to distinguish between a poacher and a hunter," he said.
SPORTS
August 4, 1996 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Pennsylvania Game Commission's 17-month attempt to gain legislative approval to raise the cost of hunting licenses continues to inch along. State Rep. Bruce Smith (R., York County), chairman of the House Game and Fisheries Committee, announced Monday that he was circulating two "working drafts" of legislation to boost license fees. An aide to Smith said that the drafts were not formal bills and that their provisions were not "etched in stone. " The drafts are intended to generate discussion on the part of lawmakers and sportsmen.
SPORTS
April 21, 1996 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Number crunching. Economists do it. Baseball statisticians do it. Wildlife biologists do it, too. And if they want to do a good job of crunching, they need to start with good numbers. While information on some game species, such as deer and wild turkeys, is abundant when wildlife agencies estimate harvests and make decisions involving hunting seasons and bag limits, that is not the case for many migratory game birds. Now, in response, Pennsylvania has created a migratory game-bird hunting license, which will provide the names and addresses of hunters so biologists can gather data through hunter surveys.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three ninth graders at Octorara High School have been given 10-day suspensions for bringing racist material into the school - specifically, a "license" to hunt blacks. Principal Henry Detering said two of the students had shown the papers to fellow students on the bus and at school on the morning of Dec. 5. They had obtained the material the day before from a ninth-grade friend, he said. Detering said his office learned there was a problem when several students, black and white, complained.
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