FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, one of the city's premier medical-teaching facilities, yesterday said it planned to cut day-to-day expenditures by 7 percent. The announcement comes in the wake of declining admissions, cutbacks in government funding and growing losses at the 701-bed hospital. C. Edward Schwartz, executive director of HUP, said in an interview that the hospital's original forecast of a net loss of $3.5 million for the current fiscal year, which ends in June, had increased dramatically during the first half of the year.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, officials at the prestigious Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania operated under the assumption that the hospital did not have to attract patients because patients would find it. And that was largely the way it worked until HUP posted back-to-back operating losses totaling $14.1 million the last two years. Now, in a break with tradition, university officials have decided to begin marketing the hospital and two related organizations that together form the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, which has been without a permanent executive director for more than a year, has selected the head of a respected Minnesota hospital to fill the position. University officials said yesterday that a search committee had chosen C. Edward Schwartz to be executive director of the 686-bed teaching hospital. Schwartz, 46, currently holds a similar position with the 735-bed University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic in Minneapolis. Schwartz will assume his duties on March 1. He replaces Robert L. Goodman, a physician who has been acting executive director since December 1985.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maryellen Gallagher Reilly, 58, of Lower Gwynedd, vice president of clinical and administrative operations at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died Monday, July 4, of coronary thrombosis at her summer home in Wildwood Crest, N.J. Mrs. Reilly's administrative responsibilities included oversight for emergency department operations, occupational medicine, the admissions center, clinical resource management and social work, medical records,...
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TWO CITY HOSPITALS have been tapped to help treat Ebola patients who land on American soil. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania are two of 35 hospitals throughout the country chosen to house Ebola treatment centers, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced yesterday. CHOP and HUP were selected by a panel of local, state and federal officials for inclusion in the program, which bolsters the three national treatment facilities at Emory University Hospital, Nebraska Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health, according to the CDC. "We were among the first in the nation to offer our special expertise in this global crisis, and we welcome the . . . confidence in our abilities," said Susan Phillips, Penn Medicine's senior vice president for public affairs.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vijay K. Gohel, 59, a radiologist, died Thursday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He was at work in the hospital's radiology deparment when he suffered a massive heart attack. He had been a resident of Cherry Hill for the last 20 years. Dr. Gohel was a physician at HUP for about the last 15 years. Until recently he had been chief of radiology for the Veterans Administration Hospital in Philadelphia for 10 years. "He was a hell of a father," recalled a son, Gautam V. Gohel.
NEWS
July 23, 2002
ONE OF THE bitter ironies of today's health-care system has recently shown its face to our family. Something is wrong when the death of a pet is respectfully acknowledged and the death of my sister, a remarkably brave and life-loving human being, is not acknowledged by her health-care team. Maybe it's just a sign of the times. The veterinarians at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania made supportive telephone calls and sent hand-written notes of condolence.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | By GINA BOUBION, Daily News Staff Writer
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania laid off 110 workers yesterday to avert an $11 million budget deficit next year. In addition to the layoffs, HUP officials eliminated 129 full-time positions that were vacant, said HUP executive director C. Edward Schwartz. Schwartz said the layoffs and eliminations would trim the budget deficit to $7 million this year, and eliminate it by June 1989. Schwartz attributed most of the deficit to a drop in hospital admissions over the year and to federal reductions in Medicare reimbursement.
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
About 200 employees at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania will be out of work by mid-January because of plans to trim $4 million from the hospital's $11 million operating deficit by June 30, according to hospital officials. "Expense reductions obviously are going to affect our personnel," said Dr. Edward J. Stemmler, executive vice president for the medical center. "We are thinking of full-time equivalents - in the range of about 200 people . . . out of a total employee group of a little over 4,000.
NEWS
July 15, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. News & World Report has commended 10 Philadelphia hospitals - more than most metro areas, including New York and Los Angeles, but fewer than Boston - in its annual ranking of the nation's best hospitals. Leading the way was the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, which placed in the top 50 in 14 of 17 medical specialties, including cancer and ophthalmology. HUP is also the only local hospital listed in what the magazine calls its "Honor Roll" of hospitals, an index of centers that scored especially well in the 17 specialties.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
SARAH S. PONDER, 96, an accountant, financial secretary, and longtime South Philadelphian known as "Sissy" or "Sis" to family members, died Saturday, May 7, at Good Shepherd Penn Partners at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Ponder was born on Sept. 21, 1919, in Hopewell, Va., to James and Anna Belle Smith. Her family moved to Philadelphia when she was an infant, and she attended public schools, graduating from South Philadelphia High School in 1936. She then took accounting classes at Temple University before joining the staff of Union Baptist Church in 1938.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
The Health Care Innovation Accelerator Pitch Day staged by Penn Medicine was different from most start-up showcases. There seemed to be more at stake. You could almost hear the angst in the Jordan center auditorium last week as presenters addressed treatment issues, some verging on life and death, that harm patients and push America's health-care costs sky-high. So what ails the system? And what are the fixes? Pre-Op+ project presenter and anesthesiologist Marc Royo aims to change the down-to-the-wire nature of pre-screenings for patients with scheduled operations.
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Jill Castellano, Staff Writer
When expectant mother Brittany Gillette, 21, felt her water break at 5 a.m. Saturday, howling wind was stacking snow in front of her house and she feared she wouldn't make it to a hospital. Gillette quickly woke up her fiancé and her dad, who went outside to shovel a path for the car outside their West Philadelphia home. After a futile hour of work, they called an ambulance. The ambulance got as far as the corner and got stuck. "I was at the top of the block and they told me to walk to the bottom because they couldn't make it through," said Gillette.
NEWS
December 6, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Emily Inverso, a pharmacist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, saw the name pop up on the emergency room admissions board, she did a double take. "I said, 'There's no way there could be another Dan Hussar.' " As soon as she could, she went up to the patient's room and knocked on the door frame. "Do you remember me?" she asked. "He said, 'Keep talking.' And before I could say another word, he said, 'Emily Inverso.' After so many years and so many students, he remembered.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
G. Clayton Kyle, 90, formerly of Chestnut Hill, a Philadelphia endocrinologist who specialized in treating diabetes, died Wednesday, Dec. 24, of complications from a subdural hematoma at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr. Dr. Kyle spent his entire career at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) and served as the chairman of its medical board from 1977 until 1979. He rose to the level of clinical associate professor of medicine. Dr. Kyle's work centered on controlling the negative effects of diabetes.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TWO CITY HOSPITALS have been tapped to help treat Ebola patients who land on American soil. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania are two of 35 hospitals throughout the country chosen to house Ebola treatment centers, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced yesterday. CHOP and HUP were selected by a panel of local, state and federal officials for inclusion in the program, which bolsters the three national treatment facilities at Emory University Hospital, Nebraska Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health, according to the CDC. "We were among the first in the nation to offer our special expertise in this global crisis, and we welcome the . . . confidence in our abilities," said Susan Phillips, Penn Medicine's senior vice president for public affairs.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A recent traveler to West Africa who was evaluated for Ebola at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania does not have the disease, the hospital said Friday. The patient's blood sample was tested at the state lab in Lionville, Chester County, and showed no evidence of the deadly virus, said Susan Phillips, Penn Medicine's senior vice president for public affairs. She said the hospital and the state lab have been in contact with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WILLIAM ANDERSON'S grandparents had only one question last night as they sat in the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. "Why?" Why would a group of armed thugs attack their grandson, a delivery driver for a Wynnefield pizzeria who police say has never had a run-in with the law? The short answer, according to police, is greed: The three men called Pete's Pizza, on 54th Street near Arlington, at 1 a.m. yesterday looking to rob one of the restaurant's drivers. Anderson, 30, answered that call, arriving at an apartment complex on 63rd Street near Jefferson in Overbrook to find a group of at least three attackers waiting for him. "They definitely had this planned," said Lt. John Walker of the Southwest Detective Division.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai and Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writers
Lindenwold police Saturday night were searching for an intruder who they said shot a man at the Coachman Manor Apartments during an apparent early-morning robbery attempt of the victim's home. Ever Santos, 25, a resident of the Gibbsboro Road apartment, was shot multiple times shortly after 4 a.m., according to a statement from County Prosecutor Warren W. Faulk and Lindenwold Police Chief Thomas Brennan. Santos was pronounced dead at 5:05 a.m. at Kennedy University Hospital-Stratford.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wallace T. Miller Sr., 81, of East Falls, who rose from poverty in Appalachia to become one of the most accomplished radiologists of his generation, died Sunday, June 23, at his home of metastatic lymphoma. Dr. Miller was known as an outstanding clinical radiologist and charismatic teacher during the half-century he served on the staff of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He took top honors in his field, including the 1997 Gold Medal Award from the Radiological Society of North America, and won nearly every accolade possible for his work at Penn's medical school.
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