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Hurricane Floyd

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SPORTS
September 17, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was wait-and-see yesterday for most athletic directors deciding whether to reschedule football games this weekend. It could be wade-and-see if Hurricane Floyd continues to dump buckets of water on area football fields. Penncrest at Upper Darby, originally scheduled for tonight at 7, was pushed back to tomorrow at 7 p.m. Glen Mills at Allentown Central Catholic, originally scheduled for tomorrow at 7 p.m., was moved to Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Most athletic directors decided to wait out the rain, however.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | By Stephanie Doster, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Demolition is scheduled to begin today on the six Bristol Borough houses that the county bought after they were damaged by flooding during Hurricane Floyd in September. County officials said 12 more houses that were damaged in the storm throughout Lower Bucks County were scheduled to be demolished next week. County health officials had recommended tearing down the vacant homes as soon as possible to prevent vermin and insect infestations and other problems. The county has bought 43 houses on about eight acres damaged in last year's flood in Bensalem, Bristol, Lower Southampton, Northampton and Middletown Townships, and Hulmeville Borough, according to William Mitchell, the county's executive director of Parks and Recreation.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | By Mark Stroh, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bruce Merkle was proud of the boardwalk at Merry Place. For more than a year and a half, after work and on weekends, sometimes with his own crews and sometimes with troops of volunteers, Merkle built the boardwalk. It enabled children and adults, on foot and in wheelchairs, to approach and enjoy the waters of Darby Creek. "I know how to do piers," Merkle said, citing 20 years of construction experience. "I felt we overbuilt it. " That was until he watched whole sections of the 80-foot-long structure wash away like dry leaves in the floodwaters caused by Hurricane Floyd.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Against a gray sky and beneath a gentle rain, the orange bulldozer crashed against the walls of 1219 and 1221 Chestnut St. Bricks, wood and glass fell like paper in the wind. The rain helped dispel heavy dust. Former residents, friends and family members stood on the south side of the street, watching the first two of 43 homes made unlivable by floods from Hurricane Floyd be reduced to rubble. "It'll never be the same," said Marie Coughlin, 35, who grew up on the street. Yesterday, she and her daughter, Heather, 11, came to witness the start of demolition of the houses along Darby Creek devastated by the mid-September hurricane.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 15 months since Hurricane Floyd wrecked the sewage system at Ancora Psychiatric Hospital, some of the 660 patients have been washing their clothes in sinks, tubs and toilets, and others have said they wear clothing in the shower to clean it, a volunteer patient advocate says. "But many clients don't even try to wash their clothes," David M. Halpern said. "They just wear the same filthy clothes week after week. The only time anyone does anything about it is when an inspection is coming.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Fridays ago at 6 a.m., with the skies still dark and rain falling, a bus pulled out of the tiny Camden County borough of Lawnside and headed 430 miles south, to Princeville, N.C. Its mission was as plain as the signs taped to the windows: "People Helping People. " Until September, none of the 19 riders had heard of Princeville. Hardly anyone in America had. But then Hurricane Floyd stormed through, and the Tar River swept over the dike 37 feet above its banks. Of nearly 1,500 homes, 1,200 were damaged or destroyed.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
My hometown is under water. My stepmother can't believe she left her pills behind on the dining-room table. My father, 83, was wishing he had thought to grab some clothes and his checkbook, when suddenly he caught himself. "Listen to me," he said, seven days into his flood-disaster evacuation from a retirement community along the banks of the now-infamous Tar River. "I'm moaning because I don't have my checkbook while a whole lot of people can't see anything of their houses but the rooftops.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Almost three weeks after Hurricane Floyd displaced hundreds of residents from the Huntingdon Valley Club Condominiums, the Rev. Paul Randolph is waiting for another flood. But instead of murky water, the Memorial Baptist Church pastor said, this time he is expecting household goods and donated furniture to aid those who lost their homes and possessions in the storm. Mr. Randolph represents one of about a dozen area churches and synagogues working with the township to establish a donation center where items can be dropped off and picked up. Its location should be made final within the week.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | By Matt Zager, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Hurricane Floyd hit last fall, causing $30,000 in damage to their home of 31 years, Vincent Mariniello and his wife, Betty, had to be evacuated by boat. They were not able to return for six days. The floodwaters have long receded, but the Ridley Creek behind their home is not the same creek it was before. During heavy rain, it floods higher than it did in the 31 years they have lived there, the couple said. "It's not safe anymore," Vincent Mariniello said. "If we get another major storm, I could lose my home.
NEWS
June 23, 2003 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1600 block of Powell Road in Chester Township and the 1300 block of Parker Street in Chester city are about two miles apart. But they have several things in common. Both blocks are a few hundred feet from the Chester Creek, both were heavily flooded when Hurricane Floyd hit in September 1999, and both were hit hard again by flooding Friday night. They share one other thing as well: Both are next to rows of houses that were bought and demolished by the federal government in the aftermath of Floyd because they were too flood-prone.
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NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 21-year-old woman died after her vehicle veered off a rain-soaked Kelly Drive and into the Schuylkill following Sunday's deluge, police said. The woman was southbound in her 2005 Toyota Avalon when she swerved, struck a curb, and plunged into the river about 10:55 p.m., according to police. A 31-year-old man who was a passenger was able to get out of the submerged Toyota and safely onto land, police said. The woman, however, was stuck in her car and needed to be extracted.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Perhaps the most impressive aspect of Philadelphia's wettest day in 142 years of record-keeping was the rapidity with which it all happened. Of the 8.02 inches of rain measured Sunday in the 24-hour period, 7.35 of that fell between 3 and 7 p.m. That alone was a respectable-rainstorm better than the 6.63 inches wrung out from the remnants of Hurricane Floyd on Sept. 16, 1999, the erstwhile record-holder. And that one took about all day. The National Weather Service has posted a "hazardous weather outlook" for Thursday for the potential for more downpours, but the chances of anything matching Sunday's historic and peculiar deluge are less than remote.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It remains to be seen if Hurricane Sandy will set any records, but weather experts say it will be among the storms that make history, especially at the Jersey Shore. Its sheer size and its unprecedented beeline for the New Jersey coast already have set it apart from many of the region's notable storms, such as the especially destructive coastal storm of 1962, the "superstorm of 1993," and Hurricane Floyd in 1999. As he looked at pictures from the Shore on Monday, Jon Nese, a meteorologist at Pennsylvania State University, said he was most reminded of the famed March 1962 nor'easter that inundated the New Jersey coast.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By Dan Hardy and Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writers
Downpours reminiscent of Hurricane Floyd in 1999 swamped Darby Borough overnight, sending volatile Darby Creek over its banks, trapping people in their homes, closing schools, and knocking out power. "The town is closed down," said Police Chief Robert Smythe this morning. "All the major roads are flooded out. " "Darby Creek is now Darby River," said Ed Truitt, Delaware County's emergency management coordinator. The township was even declared off-limits to visitors. By noon, however, Darby Creek was back in its banks, and, ironically, fire crews were using water to rinse off McDade Boulevard, Chester Pike and other streets that a few hours earlier had been flooded.
NEWS
December 8, 2004 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In October, Ottilie Gledhill "very reluctantly" decided to sell her flood-prone home to Abington Township. She can't help but cry at the thought that it will soon be torn down. Gledhill, 75, a retired elementary school teacher, inherited the stone-and-concrete house on Wanamaker Road from her parents and had lived there for 30 years. She and her husband, James, have an emotional attachment to the property. But Gledhill has also lived through several disastrous floods from Baeder Creek, which is normally just a trickle through her backyard.
NEWS
August 3, 2004 | By Tina Moore and Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
All along Cobbs Creek, Naylors Run and Darby Creek in Delaware County and Philadelphia, residents want their persistent flooding problems solved. Unfortunately, short of moving them out, there may not be much anyone can do, a storm water expert from Villanova University said yesterday. "Sometimes, you just get too much rain," said Robert Traver, a professor and director of the Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership. "The bottom line is, if they're in the floodplain, there may not be an easy way. " Right now, however, there are no plans to move Bill Sams from his home on 13th Street in Darby Borough, about 50 yards from Darby Creek.
NEWS
May 26, 2004 | By Stephanie L. Arnold and Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Abington Township will receive $3 million to buy up more than two dozen houses in flood-prone areas, state officials announced yesterday. Most of the 26 houses are on Wanamaker and Baeder Roads. "Now, we will have to negotiate with people to see if they want to sell," said Stanford A. Gross, president of the township Board of Commissioners. The goal, he said, is to "make it open space, so we don't have the cost of going in there and helping them rebuild constantly. " The $3 million grant, announced by David Sanko, director of the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, comes from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The T-shirts for sale at Manayunk Brewery and Restaurant boast that the pub is "on the banks of the Schuylkill River. " Its brochure invites guests to enjoy the view from the outdoor deck as "the river flows gently past. " One of the bar's biggest sellers is a raspberry ale it calls "Schuylkill Punch. " But sometimes, being the river's neighbor isn't all it's cracked up to be. Yesterday was one of those days. "We've got our sandbags here, and we're tracking the weather by the hour," said brewery general manager Michael Rose, who saw his restaurant take on about 7 1/2 feet of water when the remnants of Hurricane Floyd blew through the area in 1999.
NEWS
September 17, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley and Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Flood water that wreaked havoc across Chester County on Monday had receded by yesterday, but passions were high among those left to cope with the damage. Many who spent yesterday pumping out basements, pulling up soaked carpets, and waiting for visits from the insurance adjuster vowed to move from flood-prone homes. Some also said they were waiting in dread of a repeat performance if Hurricane Isabel hits later in the week. "I feel a loss now. I just don't know what to do," a bewildered Florence Miles, 72, of Downingtown, said.
NEWS
June 23, 2003 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1600 block of Powell Road in Chester Township and the 1300 block of Parker Street in Chester city are about two miles apart. But they have several things in common. Both blocks are a few hundred feet from the Chester Creek, both were heavily flooded when Hurricane Floyd hit in September 1999, and both were hit hard again by flooding Friday night. They share one other thing as well: Both are next to rows of houses that were bought and demolished by the federal government in the aftermath of Floyd because they were too flood-prone.
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