CollectionsHurricane Frances
IN THE NEWS

Hurricane Frances

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
September 3, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Florida State and Miami will still play in prime time, just 4 days later than planned. The nationally televised game, originally scheduled for Monday night, was postponed as Hurricane Frances moved closer to Florida. No. 11 Florida's opener against Middle Tennessee State tomorrow also was rescheduled. The game between the No. 5 Seminoles and No. 6 Hurricanes will be played next Friday night at the Orange Bowl. "Our biggest concern is for the safety of anyone who is in the path of Hurricane Frances, and we felt the appropriate thing to do is to reschedule the game," Miami athletic director Paul Dee said.
NEWS
September 8, 2004
WATCHING coverage of Hurricane Frances on the Weather Channel, I was shocked to see meteorologists giving reports from the beach and in front of exploding transformers. One reporter was almost knocked out by a steel beam that came floating her way. Have people lost the ability to see winds blowing off roofs without having someone risking their life to spell it out for them? Sending reporters out in such dangerous environments is the height of poor taste. Donna Di Giacomo, Philadelphia
SPORTS
September 3, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The way the Florida Marlins are playing, only a force of nature could slow them down. That's exactly what happened. Carl Pavano and the visiting Marlins completed a four-game sweep of the New York Mets with a 9-6 win yesterday, then packed up and headed back to South Florida to prepare for Hurricane Frances. The storm already forced the postponement of tonight's game against the Chicago Cubs. Players showered and dressed quickly so they could return to a state bracing for its worst storm in at least a decade.
NEWS
September 6, 2004 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the perfect summer, Lt. John McShane of the Ocean City Beach Patrol said, until the very end. As it pounded Florida, Hurricane Frances did not spare the Jersey Shore yesterday. Thousands trying to make a beach day of it found themselves in the middle of whipping winds, blowing sand and rough seas. But Frances was only partly responsible for the Shore's rough weather. The conditions were mostly due to a high-pressure system moving in from Canada, according to the National Weather Service.
SPORTS
October 22, 2012
Jamar Chaney Linebacker St. Lucie West Centennial High School Port St. Lucie, Fla. Given that the year before it had gone 9-1 and had some of the better players from that squad back, it was understandable that the St. Lucie West Centennial High School football team had high expectations as the 2004 season approached. Jamar Chaney remembers, "We had a chance of winning the state championship that year. " But that was before the east coast of Florida was hit by two devastating hurricanes within weeks of one another.
NEWS
September 14, 2004 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The grand, brick-paved entrance to the Breakers Hotel leads to an ironic end these days. Security guards have been turning away dejected luxury-seekers ever since the barrier island on which Palm Beach is located reopened to the public on Sunday. But if the well-to-do cannot get in to de-stress at the spa or dine on the lobster thermidor at this palace of a hotel by the sea on Florida's east coast, the public-works crews who are toiling 12 hours a day to clean up the mountains of debris are being fed three squares in the banquet rooms.
NEWS
September 6, 2004 | By Troy Graham and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Residents of Florida's Atlantic Coast began emerging from their shelters and returning home yesterday after being pounded by mammoth Hurricane Frances, and the storm's remnants pummeled inland residents with high winds and heavy rains last night. Frances dumped up to 13 inches of rain on coastal areas after the agonizingly slow-moving storm finally made landfall early yesterday. Though not as devastating as feared and though downgraded to a tropical storm yesterday afternoon, Frances still caused extensive flooding and wind damage, and left more than five million people without power.
NEWS
September 12, 2004 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the seventh day, teenagers Mike Pinera and Anthony Dezuani went fishing. "I'm finally getting out to see how Wellington held up," Pinera, 16, said as he ambled around a boarded-up shopping center in the neighborhood with his best friend. "It's driving me crazy that Ivan is coming. There have been too many hurricanes all in one month," said Dezuani, 15. They were itching to go fishing after being cooped up for a week. After a big storm, the catch is usually plentiful, but their favorite pier was washed away by Hurricane Frances.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even before it made landfall, Hurricane Frances had a tremendous impact on Florida by setting off massive and disruptive evacuations. In all likelihood, the majority of those who left probably could have stayed home safely, but hurricane experts said the evacuations were unavoidable. They blame the limitations of science and the eccentric behavior of the storms themselves. "Hurricanes are like drunken sailors, sailing through the atmosphere," said Frank D. Marks Jr., head of the government's Hurricane Research Division.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Anthony R. Wood and Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Slow-moving Hurricane Frances finally began storming inland today, assaulting Florida's Atlantic Coast with sheets of 105-m.p.h. wind-driven rain that ripped away roofs, trees and power to about two million people. Because it is moving so slowly and on such a wide front, officials feared Frances would pound large areas of the Florida peninsula for up to 15 hours in a marathon of anxiety and devastation. Making its landfall about 1 a.m. near Sewall's Point, just east of Stuart, about 20 miles south of Fort Pierce and 40 miles north of West Palm Beach, Frances began battering Florida's central Atlantic Coast counties with torrential rain squalls and roaring winds that sent clouds of sand into the sky. Coconuts were blown off palm trees and then the trees themselves were blown over as Frances' eye wall arrived.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 22, 2012
Jamar Chaney Linebacker St. Lucie West Centennial High School Port St. Lucie, Fla. Given that the year before it had gone 9-1 and had some of the better players from that squad back, it was understandable that the St. Lucie West Centennial High School football team had high expectations as the 2004 season approached. Jamar Chaney remembers, "We had a chance of winning the state championship that year. " But that was before the east coast of Florida was hit by two devastating hurricanes within weeks of one another.
NEWS
September 14, 2004 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The grand, brick-paved entrance to the Breakers Hotel leads to an ironic end these days. Security guards have been turning away dejected luxury-seekers ever since the barrier island on which Palm Beach is located reopened to the public on Sunday. But if the well-to-do cannot get in to de-stress at the spa or dine on the lobster thermidor at this palace of a hotel by the sea on Florida's east coast, the public-works crews who are toiling 12 hours a day to clean up the mountains of debris are being fed three squares in the banquet rooms.
NEWS
September 12, 2004 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the seventh day, teenagers Mike Pinera and Anthony Dezuani went fishing. "I'm finally getting out to see how Wellington held up," Pinera, 16, said as he ambled around a boarded-up shopping center in the neighborhood with his best friend. "It's driving me crazy that Ivan is coming. There have been too many hurricanes all in one month," said Dezuani, 15. They were itching to go fishing after being cooped up for a week. After a big storm, the catch is usually plentiful, but their favorite pier was washed away by Hurricane Frances.
NEWS
September 8, 2004
WATCHING coverage of Hurricane Frances on the Weather Channel, I was shocked to see meteorologists giving reports from the beach and in front of exploding transformers. One reporter was almost knocked out by a steel beam that came floating her way. Have people lost the ability to see winds blowing off roofs without having someone risking their life to spell it out for them? Sending reporters out in such dangerous environments is the height of poor taste. Donna Di Giacomo, Philadelphia
NEWS
September 6, 2004 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the perfect summer, Lt. John McShane of the Ocean City Beach Patrol said, until the very end. As it pounded Florida, Hurricane Frances did not spare the Jersey Shore yesterday. Thousands trying to make a beach day of it found themselves in the middle of whipping winds, blowing sand and rough seas. But Frances was only partly responsible for the Shore's rough weather. The conditions were mostly due to a high-pressure system moving in from Canada, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
September 6, 2004 | By Troy Graham and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Residents of Florida's Atlantic Coast began emerging from their shelters and returning home yesterday after being pounded by mammoth Hurricane Frances, and the storm's remnants pummeled inland residents with high winds and heavy rains last night. Frances dumped up to 13 inches of rain on coastal areas after the agonizingly slow-moving storm finally made landfall early yesterday. Though not as devastating as feared and though downgraded to a tropical storm yesterday afternoon, Frances still caused extensive flooding and wind damage, and left more than five million people without power.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Anthony R. Wood and Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Slow-moving Hurricane Frances finally began storming inland today, assaulting Florida's Atlantic Coast with sheets of 105-m.p.h. wind-driven rain that ripped away roofs, trees and power to about two million people. Because it is moving so slowly and on such a wide front, officials feared Frances would pound large areas of the Florida peninsula for up to 15 hours in a marathon of anxiety and devastation. Making its landfall about 1 a.m. near Sewall's Point, just east of Stuart, about 20 miles south of Fort Pierce and 40 miles north of West Palm Beach, Frances began battering Florida's central Atlantic Coast counties with torrential rain squalls and roaring winds that sent clouds of sand into the sky. Coconuts were blown off palm trees and then the trees themselves were blown over as Frances' eye wall arrived.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even before it made landfall, Hurricane Frances had a tremendous impact on Florida by setting off massive and disruptive evacuations. In all likelihood, the majority of those who left probably could have stayed home safely, but hurricane experts said the evacuations were unavoidable. They blame the limitations of science and the eccentric behavior of the storms themselves. "Hurricanes are like drunken sailors, sailing through the atmosphere," said Frank D. Marks Jr., head of the government's Hurricane Research Division.
NEWS
September 4, 2004 | By Troy Graham and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Central Florida, its coastal communities turned into boarded-up ghost towns by the threat of Hurricane Frances, braced for a nightmare today. The National Hurricane Center in Miami forecast that Frances would make landfall as a major hurricane, with winds up to 120 m.p.h., this afternoon and then become a dangerous inland rainstorm. The storm behaved erratically yesterday, and its precise destination remained uncertain, but the forecast track had it landing near or south of Melbourne.
SPORTS
September 3, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The way the Florida Marlins are playing, only a force of nature could slow them down. That's exactly what happened. Carl Pavano and the visiting Marlins completed a four-game sweep of the New York Mets with a 9-6 win yesterday, then packed up and headed back to South Florida to prepare for Hurricane Frances. The storm already forced the postponement of tonight's game against the Chicago Cubs. Players showered and dressed quickly so they could return to a state bracing for its worst storm in at least a decade.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|