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NEWS
March 23, 2004
2004 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra (available to the public in the fall) Ford Escape (late summer) 2005 Saturn Vue Dodge Ram pickup 2006 Chevrolet Equinox Mercedes S-class 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe GMC Yukon Source: U.S. Department of Energy
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The border between the United States and Mexico is sufficiently permeable to have produced its own distinctive hybrid culture. Glass artists Einar and Jamex de la Torre, while not of the border zone, are perfect representatives of that culture. The brothers are natives of Guadalajara who moved to Southern California as adolescents. Now they produce art that is truly bicultural in the way it thoroughly homogenizes Mexican and American source material. Their small exhibition at Snyderman Gallery indicates that they look at their native and adopted cultures skeptically.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were many sides to Joseph Kassab - a skilled surgeon, a Wallingford community activist, an Army Reserve major and an area horticulturist, registered by the National Arboretum as the discoverer of a hybrid holly, 'Doctor Kassab.' Dr. Kassab, 82, died Wednesday at his Wallingford home, the same house where he had cared for the gardens since he was a child. "He was a very caring surgeon and loved his trees," said his wife of 38 years, Emma Elizabeth Smith Kassab. Born in the city of Chester, Dr. Kassab graduated in 1930 from Lafayette College and, in 1934, from Hahnemann Medical College.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1992 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell emerged from a huddle with the board members of the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority yesterday and said the center would be run by "a hybrid" of public employees and private companies. Rendell and City Council President John F. Street met for more than an hour in City Hall with the nine-member board and the top staff of the convention center, in a meeting closed to the public. The board then briefly convened a public meeting to award the $54 million bid on the Reading Terminal train shed to Dick Enterprises, of Pittsburgh.
SPORTS
March 30, 2005 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It all started inauspiciously enough a decade ago when Taylor-Made introduced the Rescue club, a funny-looking sort of half fairway wood, half long iron. As the name implies, the Rescue was designed to be easy to hit and versatile, a club that recreational golfers use to get themselves out of trouble their other clubs had gotten them into. Ten years later, the Rescue - generically dubbed a "hybrid" club by the dozen or more manufacturers who have their own variations - is no longer a fad but the fastest-growing category of club in the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
From time immemorial, if not sooner, women have wondered whether all men are pigs. Modern science has muddied the waters - can you cross a pig with a man? Is that redundant? And what do you call something that's part pig, or some other species, and part man? What would you call a guy who dated such a creature? Would the word "pig" even suffice? All these questions, and more, are explored in the zestily disturbing sci-fi/horror/monster mash-up "Splice. " It's a new-age Frankenstein about two married scientists (their names are Clive and Elsa, taken from the actors in "Frankenstein" movies)
NEWS
May 3, 2005 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Take away the laptops at the sound console and the camera phones, and the Mars Volta's 2 1/2-hour show of heavy rock transcendence at the Electric Factory on Sunday was an authentic, mind-expanding happening straight out of the original psychedelic ballroom in the late '60s. (The band plays a second sold-out show there tonight.) The band, expanded to seven pieces for the live performance, turned the Santana-on-steroids opener "Drunkship of Lanterns" into a half-hour opus that spewed discordant sax skronk, and its 35-minute finale, "Cassandra Gemini," made King Crimson's pioneering prog-rock absurdity "Court of the Crimson King" seem tame.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1995 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's a cross between Waiting for Godot, Cabaret and Towering Inferno. It's "Cocktail in the Sky," a hard-to-peg but explosively funny dance-theater hybrid. This collaboration between choreographer Melanie Stewart and the Scottish-based Benchtours theater company bowed at Temple Center City's Stage III on Friday, sharing the bill with Darla Stanley's "Blood Carved. " Surprisingly, there was a coherent story here, emerging in pieces from under the strange goings-on: Five disparate characters find themselves in an elevator, bound for the highest cocktail lounge ever built.
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Question: I understand that both Toyota and Honda are coming out with electric cars. When will they go on sale, and how much will they cost? Answer: They aren't true electric vehicles, for openers. They are called hybrids, which means they derive their power from both an electric motor and a small gas engine. The Honda Insight coupe is due on the U.S. market early next year. The Toyota Prius sedan will be along later as a 2001 model. (It is already on sale in Japan.) The advantage of the hybrid is that it gets much better mileage than a conventional gas-powered car - 70 m.p.g.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Of the manga artists producing adult comics in Japan, the one who most fascinates me is Masamune Shirow, whose work is the basis of the spectacular and heady Ghost in the Shell films and, now, Appleseed. The William Gibson of anime, Shirow is a cyberpunk artist-philosopher whose theme is how we define humanity in the cybernetic age. The imagery in Appleseed, a post-apocalyptic film set in a utopian community where the gleaming facades are beginning to crack under the strain of a plot against cyborgs, is so photorealistic that it's hard to believe it's the product of computer generation.
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NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
The same week Mr. Driver's Seat had his first-ever chance to get behind the wheel of the all-electric, new-for-2015 Volkswagen e-Golf, a message arrived in my inbox noting that electrified car sales - meaning electric vehicles and hybrids - are essentially flat for 2013 to 2014. Volkswagen will not be the only manufacturer joining the all-electric car race for this model year. Kia plans the Soul EV and Fiat the 500e for select markets in the near future, and Tesla is adding the Model X to the Model S. These new models join the Smart electric drive, Nissan Leaf, Ford Focus Electric, and Mitsubishi I-Miev.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - With billions at stake, the standoff over how to resolve Pennsylvania's pension crisis has loomed large as budget negotiations begin this spring. A decision Thursday by the Public Employee Retirement Commission may signal a break. The bipartisan panel backed legislation to create a hybrid pension system for state and school employees, and Gov. Corbett said he would support it. "The governor has called on the commonwealth to address pension issues, the spiraling year-over-year costs to the commonwealth - and school district costs - as well as addressing the risk to the taxpayers," Corbett spokesman Jay Pagni said.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Even after a five-year impasse, the tentative contract agreement between the city and AFSCME District Council 47 looks like a classic labor compromise, with both sides gaining and giving ground on different issues. That makes it a political godsend for Mayor Nutter, who had become the favorite whipping boy for the city labor movement and is still in a standoff with the biggest municipal union, District Council 33. The city is set to resume negotiations Friday with D.C. 33 and its president, Pete Matthews.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The new-for-2013 Lexus ES 300h is the automaker's first resident in the entry-level luxury hybrid subdivision, a growing community. To do this, it substituted a four-cylinder gas engine, two electric motors and a 36-module battery pack for the V-6 in the conventional ES 350. In the process, it came up with a midsize entry-level luxury sedan with an EPA city mileage estimate of 40 m.p.g. - almost twice what the ES 350 gets. In addition to the hybridization, the 300h benefits from two significant changes in the ES for 2013.
SPORTS
June 13, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two-hundred-plus yards short of the sixth green Wednesday morning, Merion's unforgiving rough clutched Hideki Matsuyama's ball and wasn't going to yield it easily. If this had been practice for the 1971 or 1981 U.S. Opens, the Japanese youngster would have reached for a 5-iron and hoped for the best. He might have hit it cleanly enough to get there. More likely, he'd have popped it up far short. But this was 2013 and Matsuyama had an advantage all those golfers who played in previous Merion Opens did not. He reached for his hybrid.
SPORTS
May 24, 2013 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
IT'S LATE MAY and we're bored and impatient. The Monday night season opener against the Redskins still is 3 1/2 months away, but we want answers. Now. We want to know who the Eagles' starting quarterback will be. We want to know when the hotshot first-round offensive tackle will start taking snaps with the first team. We want to know how much they will run the ball and how much they will pass it. We want to know what Chip Kelly is putting in those damn smoothies. We want to know whether Danny Watkins is a dead man walking.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
PERSONALLY, I'M GLAD that at least a couple of Philly state lawmakers appear to focus on goals higher and nobler than usually seen in your Legislature. Democratic Rep. Dwight Evans, for example, is out to save the planet. Democratic Sen. Mike Stack seems driven to cleanliness, which, as you know, is next to godliness. So, good for them. And I hope you admire their aspirations because, well, you're paying for them. These factoids about this pair emerge following a comprehensive review of lawmakers' expenses published in Monday's Pittsburgh Tribune-Review . Evans, of course, is a two-decades-plus North Philly House member who once ran for governor (and lieutenant governor and mayor)
SPORTS
February 25, 2013 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
INDIANAPOLIS - Bill Davis calls it the "predator. " Gus Bradley calls it the "Leo. " It's the weakside defensive end, who predominately rushes the passer in a hybrid defense. Whether they ended up with Chip Kelly or Bradley, the Eagles were moving to a hybrid scheme that utilized both 4-3 and 3-4 principles. Kelly, of course, got the head coaching job, but he and Davis, his defensive coordinator, have revealed very little about their defense. Kelly's stated preference and Davis' history, along with the buzz at the NFL combine this past week, have made it evident that the Eagles will have a very different scheme, one that needs players they don't have.
SPORTS
February 10, 2013 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer
When the NHL's 119-day lockout finally died last month, it took with it a potential rule change that hit home for Flyers defenseman Kurtis Foster. Granted, Foster would rather be playing than pushing for new league policy. Still, Foster couldn't help but shake his head when asked about the AHL - the minor hockey league often used as the NHL's proving ground for potential changes - abandoning its experiment with hybrid icing once the lockout ended. Foster, 31, nearly lost his leg and almost had his career cut short because of the NHL's dangerous icing regulations, which require players to touch the puck after it has been iced by the opposing team.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
America's destiny for the Rhône's famous red grape will ultimately be crafting wines that land between the earthy French version known as "syrah" and the luscious Aussie fruit bomb dubbed "shiraz. " The perfect compromise should probably be called "sy-raz," although I'm sure the great winemakers of Washington State would object. They stick with the classic label of syrah, and since these tend to be my favorite domestic renditions, they've earned the right. Even so, a great bottle like this 2006 Cougar Crest Reserve from Walla Walla, steeply discounted in Pennsylvania issue from $55 to $24.99, shows its true hybrid personality in the glass - in the very best way. The fruit is New World ripe, brooding, figgy, round, and deep.
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