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Hybrid Vehicles

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NEWS
March 26, 2005
Gas prices hit a national average of $2.11 a gallon this week, causing pain to anyone who drives a car. What if you operated 38,000 vehicles, as the state of Pennsylvania does? A 36.6-cent per-gallon difference over the previous year puts a real crimp in the budget. Pennsylvania should follow the lead of those cities and states, including New Jersey, that are buying gas-efficient hybrid vehicles for their government workers to drive. Hybrid vehicles are powered by both an internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor.
NEWS
November 2, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia City Councilman James F. Kenney wants the city to replace more of its gas-guzzling fleet of cars with fuel-efficient hybrid automobiles. Although the city's inventory of hybrids currently stands at just seven vehicles out of roughly 6,000, Mayor Street said he was leading the way. Two weeks ago, the van used by Street's police escort was replaced by a hybrid SUV that gets twice the gas mileage of its predecessor. But Kenney, who held hearings on the issue yesterday, said Philadelphia hadn't done enough.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2005 | By Andres R. Martinez INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Drivers seeking to beat rising gas prices by buying hybrid vehicles could save more money if they are patient. Starting next year, people who buy or lease hybrid vehicles - cars or sport-utility vehicles powered by both gasoline and electric engines - can get tax credits of up to $3,400. The credit is a dollar-for-dollar reduction in what you owe in income taxes. It is included in the energy bill that President Bush signed into law Aug. 8. Not all hybrids have been approved for the credit, and how much you will get back depends on the efficiency of the car and when you buy it. In addition, a cap on how many hybrid purchases qualify and waiting lists for some hybrids mean you will have to act fast.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayoral candidate Chaka Fattah yesterday proposed examining a "congestion charge" that would require drivers to pay to bring their cars into traffic-clogged parts of central Philadelphia at peak hours. Fattah offered few specifics about what his plan would cost or just how it would be implemented. He said he hoped only to "study" the idea. "We cannot have a city in which everyone expects to be able to drive their car everywhere they want to go," Fattah said. Fattah's idea is modeled on a program that has slashed vehicular traffic and commute times in London since its introduction in 2003.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
Motorists stung by rising gas prices may be on their own in the short term, but it's vital that they learn how to cope - for the sake of their household budgets as well as the nation's fragile economic recovery. The early arrival of springtime price increases at the gas pump is being fueled by factors beyond the control of most consumers. There are fears stemming from tensions in the Mideast over Iran's nuclear aspirations, as well as speculation involving crude oil prices.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Rick Callahan, Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Indianapolis wants to become the first major city to replace its entire fleet with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles in a move the mayor says is designed to reduce U.S. reliance on foreign-produced fuels, city officials said Wednesday. Mayor Greg Ballard signed an executive order Wednesday mandating the city to replace its current sedans with electric vehicles. The city will also work with the private sector to phase in snow plows, fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas, and it will ask automakers to develop a plug-in hybrid police car as one doesn't yet exist.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2012
In the Region W. Conshy office building sold MIM-Hayden Real Estate Funds bought Five Tower Bridge, an eight-story office building in West Conshohocken, from KBS Real Estate Investment Trust of Newport Beach, Calif., in a deal worth $70 million, including the assumption of a $40 million mortgage. The sales price is a little less than the $73 million that KBS paid for the 226,000-square-foot tower in October 2008. - Joseph N. DiStefano   Murdoch to leave Glaxo board GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
August 5, 2005
Hybrid vehicles - those gas-electric fuel misers - are moving beyond Hollywood status symbols into the mainstream. More automakers are making them, and more consumers are interested, especially as gasoline hovers over $2 a gallon. The first hybrids - the Honda Insight and Toyota Prius - devoted their technology to cutting fuel consumption and reducing air pollution. They made owners feel virtuous, but they were small, expensive and not very fast. As hybrids move into their next generation, automakers want models with wider appeal - larger vehicles with more amenities that can carry families and all their belongings.
NEWS
March 21, 2003
On and off for 23 years, Congress has argued over drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, falsely betting on that sliver of tundra as the liberator from imported oil. Now that the Senate has decisively defeated the proposal - again - Congress should wise up and try something smarter. In those two decades of supply-side debate, oil consumption has increased by 33 percent, and energy efficiency has stagnated. America gobbles 25 percent of the world's oil but has only 3 percent of the reserves.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carmakers and their customers finally sobered up. The consumption party that was the 1990s - a time when dot-commers lit their cigars with hundred-dollar bills, energy flowed like cheap booze on New Year's Eve, and people bought SUVs with nary a thought to gas mileage - is over. This year's Philadelphia International Auto Show will begin tonight with a black-tie gala. It will make clear that we're in a new automotive age. The show, which will end Feb. 12, features an array of fuel-efficient hybrid vehicles displayed by several manufacturers.
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NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Rick Callahan, Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Indianapolis wants to become the first major city to replace its entire fleet with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles in a move the mayor says is designed to reduce U.S. reliance on foreign-produced fuels, city officials said Wednesday. Mayor Greg Ballard signed an executive order Wednesday mandating the city to replace its current sedans with electric vehicles. The city will also work with the private sector to phase in snow plows, fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas, and it will ask automakers to develop a plug-in hybrid police car as one doesn't yet exist.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
Motorists stung by rising gas prices may be on their own in the short term, but it's vital that they learn how to cope - for the sake of their household budgets as well as the nation's fragile economic recovery. The early arrival of springtime price increases at the gas pump is being fueled by factors beyond the control of most consumers. There are fears stemming from tensions in the Mideast over Iran's nuclear aspirations, as well as speculation involving crude oil prices.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2012
In the Region W. Conshy office building sold MIM-Hayden Real Estate Funds bought Five Tower Bridge, an eight-story office building in West Conshohocken, from KBS Real Estate Investment Trust of Newport Beach, Calif., in a deal worth $70 million, including the assumption of a $40 million mortgage. The sales price is a little less than the $73 million that KBS paid for the 226,000-square-foot tower in October 2008. - Joseph N. DiStefano   Murdoch to leave Glaxo board GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Jeff Shields, and Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writers
The "ducks," as the World War II-era amphibious vehicles are popularly called, aren't quite a truck or a boat, and many aren't from the 1940s, either. That complicated heritage has produced a complicated web of agencies that regulate these floating vehicles, a popular and familiar tourist attraction in Philadelphia since 2003. The Ride the Ducks operation, owned by an entertainment company based outside Atlanta, is regulated on various levels by city, state, and federal authorities.
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Jeff Shields and Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The "ducks" as the World War II era amphibious vehicles are popularly called, aren't quite a boat or a truck, and many aren't from the 1940s, either. That complicated heritage has produced a complicated web of agencies that regulate these floating vehicles, a popular and familiar tourist attraction in Philadelphia since 2003. The "Ride the Ducks" operation, owned by an entertainment company based outside Atlanta, Ga., is regulated on various levels by city, state and federal authorities.
NEWS
March 3, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tax credits in the federal stimulus package - plus a slew of other incentives - are creating an unparalleled opportunity for people considering hybrid vehicles or making their homes more energy efficient. Want solar panels? Federal tax incentives amount to a 30 percent discount on the price. Need energy-efficient windows or insulation? Spend $4,500 and get $1,500 back as a tax credit. While some in Congress decry the spending, environmentalists see a crucial convergence.
NEWS
February 13, 2007 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayoral candidate Chaka Fattah yesterday proposed examining a "congestion charge" that would require drivers to pay to bring their cars into traffic-clogged parts of central Philadelphia at peak hours. Fattah offered few specifics about what his plan would cost or just how it would be implemented. He said he hoped only to "study" the idea. "We cannot have a city in which everyone expects to be able to drive their car everywhere they want to go," Fattah said. Fattah's idea is modeled on a program that has slashed vehicular traffic and commute times in London since its introduction in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carmakers and their customers finally sobered up. The consumption party that was the 1990s - a time when dot-commers lit their cigars with hundred-dollar bills, energy flowed like cheap booze on New Year's Eve, and people bought SUVs with nary a thought to gas mileage - is over. This year's Philadelphia International Auto Show will begin tonight with a black-tie gala. It will make clear that we're in a new automotive age. The show, which will end Feb. 12, features an array of fuel-efficient hybrid vehicles displayed by several manufacturers.
NEWS
November 2, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia City Councilman James F. Kenney wants the city to replace more of its gas-guzzling fleet of cars with fuel-efficient hybrid automobiles. Although the city's inventory of hybrids currently stands at just seven vehicles out of roughly 6,000, Mayor Street said he was leading the way. Two weeks ago, the van used by Street's police escort was replaced by a hybrid SUV that gets twice the gas mileage of its predecessor. But Kenney, who held hearings on the issue yesterday, said Philadelphia hadn't done enough.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2005 | By Andres R. Martinez INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Drivers seeking to beat rising gas prices by buying hybrid vehicles could save more money if they are patient. Starting next year, people who buy or lease hybrid vehicles - cars or sport-utility vehicles powered by both gasoline and electric engines - can get tax credits of up to $3,400. The credit is a dollar-for-dollar reduction in what you owe in income taxes. It is included in the energy bill that President Bush signed into law Aug. 8. Not all hybrids have been approved for the credit, and how much you will get back depends on the efficiency of the car and when you buy it. In addition, a cap on how many hybrid purchases qualify and waiting lists for some hybrids mean you will have to act fast.
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