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Hypnosis

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NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
A federal court panel in Philadelphia has dismissed a civil suit filed by two former Ridley High School students who claimed they suffered adverse effects from a classroom demonstration of hypnotism. Named in the suit were hypnotherapist Joseph Scott, Ridley School District, Superintendent John S. Cochran, Ridley High School principal Theodore Beck and Edward Bradway, a psychology-class instructor. "After four years of grief and a lot of legal fees, I feel vindicated," said Scott, 57, a certified hypnotherapist and operator of A Better Way Hypnosis Center in Norwood.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Two Ridley High School graduates have filed suit against the Ridley School District and a Norwood hypnotherapist, contending the two graduates suffered adverse effects from a free demonstration of hypnotism given at the school three years ago. Media attorney Jon Auritt filed the suit Tuesday in Delaware County Court on behalf of Robert Heist Jr., now 19; Lisa Caggiula, 20, and their parents. The families reside in the Morton section of Ridley Township. The suit seeks more than $20,000 in compensatory and punitive damages each for the former students and their parents.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Eils Lotozo, Special to The Inquirer
Hypnosis. Trance. To some people, these words still conjure up old movie images of a watch on a chain swinging mesmerizingly back and forth, or of a dark, menacing figure whose hapless victims turn into mindless zombies after gazing into his glittering eyes. OK. Maybe you know that this is the stuff of comic books, but maybe you have heard that hypnosis can make a four-pack-a-day die-hard quit smoking or cause the compulsive overeater to lose weight. Forget it, says clinical psychologist Joseph P. Primavera, for trance is not a magical state and hypnosis is not a miracle cure.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Want to lose weight? Quit smoking? Overcome your fears? Wendy Merron believes hypnosis can help both longtime strivers and people who recently committed to New Year's resolutions. A dozen people gathered at Congregation Or Shalom in Berwyn yesterday afternoon to learn about the technique from Merron, a certified hypnotist, and other instructors on the fifth annual World Hypnotism Day. Proponents of the technique established the day with the aim of debunking misconceptions about hypnosis and promoting its benefits.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
You sit on a tray that slides you, head first, into a giant donut of steel. Once inside, lying flat on your back, the clearance between you and the massive apparatus is about 3 inches. Say it's a brain scan that brings you inside the magnetic resonance imaging machine (MRI) that produces more detailed diagnostic information than X-rays. The helmet, something out of Capt. Video, is over your head. You'll be here for about 20 minutes. It sounds as if you're inside a trash can someone with a hammer is beating on. It's so daunting that an estimated 5 percent of patients who go in for MRI scans can't get through the procedure, said Christine Rhoda, of Graduate Hospital's Imaging Center.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court, ruling for the first time on the growing use of hypnosis in criminal cases, concluded yesterday that states may not ban the hypnotically enhanced testimony of defendants. The court also eliminated the last vestiges of the mandatory death penalty, declaring that a murderer who is serving a life term without possibility of parole and who commits another first-degree murder may not be automatically sentenced to die. In a third case involving criminal law, the court ruled that jurors may not be forced to testify about allegations that they used alcohol or drugs during a trial.
NEWS
September 5, 2016
ISSUE | HYPNOTISM Therapeutic benefits no laughing matter As a professional hypnotherapist and instructor with the National Guild of Hypnotists, I was disheartened to read the article about stage hypnosis ("Feeling . . . sleepy," Tuesday.) Hypnosis is a powerful, but often misunderstood, therapeutic tool. I've spent many years assuring people that hypnosis is not "mind control" and that I don't make my clients cluck like a chicken. Hypnosis is focused relaxation, not sleep, and is used by doctors, nurses, psychologists, therapists and coaches around the world.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
Without a single "look deep into my eyes," the case of the hypnotic challenge was temporarily laid to rest in a Burlington County courtroom yesterday. Marianne Waylock, formerly of Cinnaminson and now a licensed hypnotic therapist in California, lost her suit to claim $50,000 that had been offered by The Amazing Kreskin, a nightclub performer and mentalist from Essex County. Kreskin had extended the offer to anyone who could prove that such a thing as a hypnotic trance exists. Kreskin says he believes that hypnosis has never been scientifically proved and that results allegedly achieved through hypnosis can be achieved in a conscious state.
NEWS
August 11, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
You must . . . play this hole . . . below par . . . And watch . . . a 22-minute hypnosis video . . . that will improve your golf game. Hypnovision, a Cherry Hill company, is trying to revolutionize the hypnosis field with do-it-yourself video sessions, promising to "unleash the powers of your mind. " The company now offers three Hypnoconcepts programs, which sell for $39.99 each, to improve sleep, sexual pleasure, and golf games - the latter one its best seller. "Golf is a mental game.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By MITCH STACY, Associated Press
NORTH PORT, Fla. - High school principal George Kenney acknowledged using hypnosis to help people: students who needed to relax before tests, a basketball player having trouble making free throws, even school secretaries who wanted to quit smoking. But now, the popular 51-year-old educator's future at North Port High School is in question since it came to light that he had hypnotized two students before their separate suicides this spring. There is no indication their deaths were any more than a tragic coincidence.
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NEWS
September 5, 2016
ISSUE | HYPNOTISM Therapeutic benefits no laughing matter As a professional hypnotherapist and instructor with the National Guild of Hypnotists, I was disheartened to read the article about stage hypnosis ("Feeling . . . sleepy," Tuesday.) Hypnosis is a powerful, but often misunderstood, therapeutic tool. I've spent many years assuring people that hypnosis is not "mind control" and that I don't make my clients cluck like a chicken. Hypnosis is focused relaxation, not sleep, and is used by doctors, nurses, psychologists, therapists and coaches around the world.
NEWS
February 15, 2016 | By Edith Newhall, FOR THE INQUIRER
O f the artists who composed the Pictures Generation - Cindy Sherman, Richard Prince, Barbara Kruger, Sherrie Levine, David Salle, and others who appropriated images from various sources in their art - Matt Mullican, born in Los Angeles in 1951 to artist parents, and a student of John Baldessari at the California Institute of the Arts, always seemed to be off in his own world. He sort of was, it turned out. Looking at Mullican's mid-1970s pictographs of everyday signs (say, the isolated male figure indicating the men's room, or the lighted cigarette with the diagonal line crossing it)
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE TEST for Danny Boyle in "Trance," a movie built around amnesia and hypnosis, is to mesmerimize you into forgetting how much you hate the amnesia premise. Amnesia? I remember when Franka Potente put that question to Matt Damon in "The Bourne Identity," and made a face, so the movie could signal that it was on our side. The unabashed "Trance" dives in with Boyle's typical enthusiasm, even doubles down with hypnosis - James McAvoy is a high-class auctioneer who gets hit on the head during an art heist, then is put under hypnosis to remember what happened during the robbery.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By MITCH STACY, Associated Press
NORTH PORT, Fla. - High school principal George Kenney acknowledged using hypnosis to help people: students who needed to relax before tests, a basketball player having trouble making free throws, even school secretaries who wanted to quit smoking. But now, the popular 51-year-old educator's future at North Port High School is in question since it came to light that he had hypnotized two students before their separate suicides this spring. There is no indication their deaths were any more than a tragic coincidence.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Convicted assassin Sirhan Sirhan was manipulated by a seductive girl in a mind-control plot to shoot Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, and his bullets did not kill the presidential candidate, attorneys for Sirhan said in new legal papers. The documents filed this week in federal court detail extensive interviews with Sirhan during the past three years, some done while he was under hypnosis. The papers point to a mysterious female in a polka-dot dress as the controller who led Sirhan to fire a gun in the pantry of the Ambassador Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010
Q: After reading your column about the older woman's loss of sex drive, I'd like to add an additional idea, one that I use to create deep long-lasting pleasure for the lady: Have you ever tried hypnosis? If the loss of sex drive is for emotional rather than physical reasons, then hypnosis might help a person become less anxious or whatever. But five or 10 orgasms in an evening? I'm not buying that. Now, look into my eyes . . . Steve: Hypnosis has been used by some clinicians in treating sexual dysfunction, but I wouldn't try it at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010
IT WAS Joe Boccuti 's nightmares that led him to live his dream. The 33-year-old entertainer, whose "Hypnosterical II" runs through Sept. 5 at Trump Marina, was led to hypnotizing audience members for comedic effect by, of all things, the bad dreams that plagued him as a child. "A long, long time ago, I started having dreams, and the dreams turned to nightmares," recalled the lifelong Gloucester County resident during a recent lunch interview. "I was very inquisitive, so I started reading dream books.
NEWS
January 5, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Want to lose weight? Quit smoking? Overcome your fears? Wendy Merron believes hypnosis can help both longtime strivers and people who recently committed to New Year's resolutions. A dozen people gathered at Congregation Or Shalom in Berwyn yesterday afternoon to learn about the technique from Merron, a certified hypnotist, and other instructors on the fifth annual World Hypnotism Day. Proponents of the technique established the day with the aim of debunking misconceptions about hypnosis and promoting its benefits.
NEWS
January 7, 2003 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A jury will be allowed to hear key testimony from a Lower Merion boy who has accused his uncle, a cantor on leave from a Manhattan synagogue, of sexually assaulting him, a judge ruled yesterday. Montgomery County Judge Paul W. Tressler issued the decision in the case involving a 13-year-old boy who has accused his uncle, Howard Nevison, of repeatedly sexually abusing him between 1993 and 1998, starting when the boy was 4. Defense lawyers had asked Tressler to bar the boy's testimony because they said it was elicited during dozens of sessions with a therapist who routinely employs hypnotic methods.
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