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Hysterectomy

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NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband of a Berks County woman who died of a rare uterine cancer following a minimally invasive hysterectomy is suing the maker of the device used in her surgery at Reading Hospital. The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, adds to controversy over electric tissue-cutting "morcellators. " The devices let doctors remove tissue through tiny abdominal incisions, shortening patients' hospitalization and recovery. In rare cases, the process can disseminate an aggressive uterine cancer, leiomyosarcoma, that routine diagnostic tests usually miss.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, a doctor spoke words that threw Lynn Birnbaum into a state of panic: "immediate surgery . . . a hysterectomy might be needed. " She had gone to the doctor for treatment of fibroid tumors, benign growths in the muscular walls of the uterus. The tumors were discovered during an earlier examination. But Birnbaum was single, in her mid-30s and childless; a hysterectomy would have ended her chance to have children. Today, the Narberth resident said she still becomes angry when she thinks about that doctor's advice.
NEWS
March 31, 2004 | By Amy M. Lipson
The National Women's Health Information Center states that the second-most common surgery among women in the United States is a hysterectomy. Five years ago, I had this operation, which left me unable to reproduce. But fortunately for other women facing infertility, technological advances are providing an alternative. At age 36, I became infertile, and the choice to bear children was removed. My ovaries were enveloped with cysts, and the possibility of cancer loomed. Although my surgeon didn't believe that my cysts were cancerous, my relatives provided a pessimistic history for susceptibility to this disease.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kim Joyner would have turned 33 on Friday. Instead, Mary Joyner learned for sure that day that her youngest daughter had been murdered more than seven years ago. On June 10, 1989, the nude body of an African American woman was found in the brush near the Dannehower Bridge in Bridgeport, Montgomery County. Identification by sight was not possible because decomposition had begun. The woman had been dead for at least two days. Someone had slashed her throat - but apparently not near the bridge.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amy Reed, the doctor who has pushed for a ban on the gynecological surgery device that worsened her uterine cancer prognosis, said Wednesday that she is fighting a recurrence. Reed, 41, had about a year in apparent remission after her 2013 diagnosis and treatment for leiomyosarcoma, a rare and ferociously aggressive uterine cancer. Two weeks ago, she had surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to remove a small tumor that a scan revealed in the bony part of her spinal column.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA — Taking a bold stand on a growing medical controversy, Temple University Hospital this week issued new guidelines restricting use of a minimally invasive gynecological surgical procedure called morcellation. Electric morcellation devices are used in the body to pulverize the uterus or benign fibroids so the tissue can be removed through tiny skin incisions. In rare cases, the procedure spreads cancer that was hidden in the uterus, turning a treatable tumor into advanced disease with a grim prognosis.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
From today through Oct. 17, Philly.com and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series culminates in a special Philly.com/health Inquirer section on Oct. 18, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . "My little Sister, Debbi, was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer when she was 29 years old and pregnant," said Traci Walters of Texas. "They induced labor about a month early because the tumor was growing so fast because she was pregnant.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
You can't keep a good woman down. Or rather, in. I'm talking, of course, about Spanx. If you don't know what Spanx is, let me tell you. It's a girdle. But it's called a "body shaping garment," in that it compresses your flesh, nerves, and internal organs so that you look thinner. In other words, Spanx is a great idea if you don't like oxygen. Anyway, you might remember that, about six years ago, I wrote about how much I hated Spanx. I got introduced to them when I bought a pair by accident, thinking they were tights.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
THAT TIME OF MONTH Growing numbers of women are ending menstrual periods forever with a surgical procedure called an endometrial ablation. Originally designed as an alternative to hysterectomy, it uses a laser or electrodes to burn away the uterus lining. Unlike a hysterectomy, it removes neither the uterus nor the ovaries. It almost always leaves a woman unable to conceive, although a few have become pregnant afterward. Such use of the procedure is stirring debate within the medical community.
NEWS
April 27, 2010 | By FATIMAH ALI
AS Obamacare eventually takes shape, it seems that - given the government's increasing role in this important facet of our lives - self-empowerment will be ever more essential to improving our individual health. We must be well-informed, and develop healthy habits, as well as find alternatives to surgery and pharmaceuticals whenever possible. I always ask my doctors a kazillion questions, especially if they express an interest in removing some part of my body. When a girlfriend confided recently that her fibroid tumors (which are almost always noncancerous)
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NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Have hysterectomies gotten riskier for some of the hundreds of thousands of U.S. women who undergo these procedures each year? Researchers are trying to answer that question now that gynecologists have mostly stopped removing women's uteruses with the help of a tissue-slicing device called an electric morcellator. Introduced in 1993, the device enables uterine tissue to be removed through tiny abdominal incisions. This reduces the complications and recovery time of traditional surgeries, which require large horizonal or vertical belly incisions.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
You can't keep a good woman down. Or rather, in. I'm talking, of course, about Spanx. If you don't know what Spanx is, let me tell you. It's a girdle. But it's called a "body shaping garment," in that it compresses your flesh, nerves, and internal organs so that you look thinner. In other words, Spanx is a great idea if you don't like oxygen. Anyway, you might remember that, about six years ago, I wrote about how much I hated Spanx. I got introduced to them when I bought a pair by accident, thinking they were tights.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amy Reed, the doctor who has pushed for a ban on the gynecological surgery device that worsened her uterine cancer prognosis, said Wednesday that she is fighting a recurrence. Reed, 41, had about a year in apparent remission after her 2013 diagnosis and treatment for leiomyosarcoma, a rare and ferociously aggressive uterine cancer. Two weeks ago, she had surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to remove a small tumor that a scan revealed in the bony part of her spinal column.
NEWS
December 8, 2014
ISSUE | TAXI SAFETY Ensure it's insured An article on taxi insurance was timely, at least for me ("City cabs light on accident coverage," Nov. 27). Returning from an August medical appointment for knee surgery, I was hit by an All City Taxi cab in Center City. My attorney soon learned that the cabbie's insurance carrier is in liquidation. Perhaps it is wise to ask a taxi driver to show proof of insurance before getting in. |Michael Fill, Philadelphia, poconopadre@aol.com ISSUE | PROTESTS Root causes A recent letter writer asserts that violent protests contradict the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King's principles and thwart racial harmony ("Nonviolent civil rights activist would mourn," Nov. 30)
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two doctors' groups are defending a tissue-cutting device that makes gynecological surgery less invasive but in rare cases spreads a hidden uterine cancer. Electric morcellators, introduced in 1993, are used to dissect the uterus or uterine fibroids so tissue can be removed through small abdominal incisions. They have come under scrutiny in recent months because the motorized blade can disseminate bits of undetected cancer. Many hospitals have halted their use; the Food and Drug Administration last month issued a safety advisory "discouraging" power morcellation; and Johnson & Johnson suspended worldwide sales of its version of the machine.
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday discouraged doctors from using a machine that makes it possible to remove uteruses and uterine fibroids through small incisions because of the risk that the approach will spread cancer. The warning is a victory for a Philadelphia-trained physician couple - cardiothoracic surgeon Hooman Noorchashm and anesthesiologist Amy Reed - who campaigned extensively against use of the device. Reed discovered that she had stage-four leiomyosarcoma, an aggressive cancer, soon after having a hysterectomy and fibroid removal in Boston, where doctors used the device in a procedure known as laparoscopic power morcellation.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband of a Berks County woman who died of a rare uterine cancer following a minimally invasive hysterectomy is suing the maker of the device used in her surgery at Reading Hospital. The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, adds to controversy over electric tissue-cutting "morcellators. " The devices let doctors remove tissue through tiny abdominal incisions, shortening patients' hospitalization and recovery. In rare cases, the process can disseminate an aggressive uterine cancer, leiomyosarcoma, that routine diagnostic tests usually miss.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA — Taking a bold stand on a growing medical controversy, Temple University Hospital this week issued new guidelines restricting use of a minimally invasive gynecological surgical procedure called morcellation. Electric morcellation devices are used in the body to pulverize the uterus or benign fibroids so the tissue can be removed through tiny skin incisions. In rare cases, the procedure spreads cancer that was hidden in the uterus, turning a treatable tumor into advanced disease with a grim prognosis.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sandra Cintron's mother heard how bad her daughter's fibroid symptoms were getting - bleeding that went on for weeks and debilitating pain - she thought she knew where things were heading. "You're going to need a hysterectomy," Maria Perales said. She had one herself when she was in her 30s. A lot has changed since then, though, and Cintron, of Northeast Philadelphia, was able to choose a less extreme treatment for the benign growths on her uterus. Last week, she had an embolization at Einstein Medical Center, a procedure that left her uterus intact but cut off the blood supply to the fibroids.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
From today through Oct. 17, Philly.com and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series culminates in a special Philly.com/health Inquirer section on Oct. 18, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . "My little Sister, Debbi, was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer when she was 29 years old and pregnant," said Traci Walters of Texas. "They induced labor about a month early because the tumor was growing so fast because she was pregnant.
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