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Hysteria

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NEWS
June 8, 2009
I LOVE newspapers, but they can annoy me to no end. Two people on a bike get injured, all hell breaks loose, and we get these exaggerated assertions about changing the Parkway and the river drives. Back when then-West River Drive was one-way during morning and afternoon rush hours, one confused person went the wrong way and was killed. For one incident, they permanently changed the drive to two-way. Thirty-plus years later, we're about to go through the same stupidity. When cars crash into trees on the drive and a driver is injured or killed, do we do anything then?
NEWS
November 7, 2002
THE OCT. 18 letter titled "The real story behind voter ID" is nothing but ignorance and fantasy. Senate Bill 824 contains a number of miscellaneous election-code changes, including a clause requiring voter identification. This clause is only about protecting the integrity of the election process. A bipartisan majority of senators and representatives voted to require a stronger system than the current signature requirement. This new law puts Pennsylvania in league with 11 other states requiring documentary identification to reduce the possibility of fraud.
NEWS
July 17, 2011
Hysteria in Nineteenth-Century Paris By Asti Hustvedt W.W. Norton. 372 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Joelle Farrell Asti Hustvedt, an editor and translator in New York City, was first drawn to the subject of hysteria while working on her doctorate in French at New York University. She aimed to write a "nonhysterical book about hysteria," a condition that, at least in part, was "an illness of being a woman in an era that strictly limited female roles. " Her book, Medical Muses , examines the lives of three women diagnosed with hysteria who, through the work of a famous French neurologist, Jean-Martin Charcot, became medical celebrities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Howard Gensler and gensleh@phillynews.com
I STARTED writing screenplays when I was 10 years old.   The first one was for a James Bond movie, and the producer sent it back unopened, for legal reasons. In high school, I wrote a sitcom pilot that got me a meeting with the William Morris Agency. When they saw I was 17 and heading off to college, it was a short meeting. In the late 1990s, I co-wrote the pilot "44 Wall," with my Wharton friend Milton Lewin, about a boutique Wall Street investment bank. When our pilot script received interest from Dustin Hoffman's Punch Productions, and they told us we were brilliant and it was the best pilot they ever read, I thought I was in the door.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
STEPHEN DELGIADICE said his 8-year-old daughter was in Sandy Hook Elementary when she heard two big bangs. Teachers told her to get in a corner, he said. "It's alarming, especially in Newtown, Connecticut, which we always thought was the safest place in America," he said. His daughter was fine. Robert Licata said his 6-year-old son was in a classroom when the gunman burst in and shot the teacher. "That's when my son grabbed a bunch of his friends and ran out the door," he said.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | Steven Rea
Prudery and pleasure, repression and release… Hysteria, the Victorian-era romantic comedy, is awash in such conflict. Set in 1880s London, it's the tale — inspired by historical, if not hysterical, fact — of the invention of the vibrator. And Hugh Dancy, who stars as a young doctor who joins a practice specializing in curing women of their anxieties and afflictions by tending to their "gentle areas," wasn't exactly sure what he was getting into. "It is true that there were moments when we would stop and look at each other and silently telegraph the thought What the hell are we doing?
SPORTS
March 14, 1996 | by Ted Taylor, Special to the Daily News
In 1938, Philadelphia gum mogul J. Warren Bowman was looking for ways to market his Blony bubble-gum product and turned to the fertile mind of advertising executive George Moll for inspiration. Moll, a longtime collector of tobacco cards, sold Bowman on the idea of packaging trading cards with gum. A student of current events, Moll suggested to Bowman that a set pointing out the worldwide aggression then being played out in the Far East and Europe be issued, and he commissioned a series of pictures that would depict the "Horrors of War. " The set, whose actual title was "To Know the Horrors of War Is to Want Peace," featured some of the most gruesome pictures you'd ever want to see. People all over reacted with horror when the Bowman product hit the streets.
NEWS
September 18, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
There was a time not so long ago when Americans were appalled, angered, even frightened by a menace from abroad, whose power to do evil was unquestionably real. The entire nation seemed to believe that this menace was threatening our youth, sapping our national will, throwing into doubt our very future. Because we responded to this threat out of fear rather than with prudence, because we failed to put this threat into context, we went through something approaching a national hysteria.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Philadelphia was the home of Silas Weir Mitchell, a 19th-century physician and author who specialized in nervous disorders and hysteria. Mitchell, the son of noted physician John Kearsley Mitchell, was born Feb. 15, 1829, and he attended the University of Pennsylvania and Jefferson Medical College. His career took off after the Civil War, as he delved further into the field of neurology. He was the first to describe erythromelalgia, which was then called "Mitchell's Disease," a disorder that attacks a patient's extremities (hands, arms, and feet)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012
"Hysteria" is an English romantic comedy about the invention of the vibrator. So who better to view an advance screening than our own romance columnists, Steve & Mia? The movie, based on an idea from Daily News Tattle columnist Howard Gensler, opens Friday. Here's what Steve & Mia had to say:   Steve: When I was single and dating, I often wondered about the myth of the female orgasm. Mia: For the women you dated, it was a myth. Steve: I'm serious. You heard what Dr. Robert Dalrymple (played by Jonathan Pryce)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 15, 2016
The year is 2016. The scene: a street in West Philadelphia. A local physician is in his car, stopped at a traffic light, when a man with a gun rushes out and begins firing at the car. Miraculously, the doctor is not killed, but he does suffer serious bullet wounds to his left arm and leg. The assailant runs down the street, then tackled by an alert town watch member, who manages to subdue him and call the police. Later, at a news conference, police officials identify the physician at a staff member at a local nonprofit clinic that performs abortions.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ONE MAN became a weapon of Mass disruption at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church in Drexel Hill two weeks ago, when he punched a man in a dispute over a crying baby during a Sunday afternoon service, according to police. After a nearly two-week investigation into the Oct. 20 incident, Upper Darby police charged Matthew von Siegel, 36, of Clifton Heights, with simple assault and harassment on Friday. According to Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood, von Siegel was attending the church's 4 p.m. Mass when he turned to say something to a woman about her crying baby.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | George Parry, For the Inquirer
On Monday, in a Florida courtroom, George Zimmerman goes on trial for the murder of Trayvon Martin. In the immediate aftermath of Martin's death in February 2012, the mainstream media portrayed Zimmerman as a gun-crazy vigilante who stalked and murdered a harmless black youth. Since then, Mark O'Mara, Zimmerman's tenacious lawyer, has extracted bits and pieces of evidence from an ethically challenged prosecution that prove Zimmerman shot Martin in self-defense. So, at long last, the media's false narrative is about to collide with the hard facts in a court of law. Let's start with the tape of Zimmerman's 911 call to police.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Even during this desultory economic recovery, one industry thrives: the manufacture of synthetic hysteria. It is, however, inaccurate to accuse the Hysteric in Chief of crying "Wolf!" about spending cuts under the sequester. He is actually crying "Hamster!" As in: Batten down the hatches - the sequester will cut $85 billion from this year's $3.6 trillion budget! Or: Head for the storm cellar - spending will be cut 2.3 percent! Or: Washington chainsaw massacre - we must scrape by on 97.7 percent of current spending!
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Philadelphia was the home of Silas Weir Mitchell, a 19th-century physician and author who specialized in nervous disorders and hysteria. Mitchell, the son of noted physician John Kearsley Mitchell, was born Feb. 15, 1829, and he attended the University of Pennsylvania and Jefferson Medical College. His career took off after the Civil War, as he delved further into the field of neurology. He was the first to describe erythromelalgia, which was then called "Mitchell's Disease," a disorder that attacks a patient's extremities (hands, arms, and feet)
NEWS
December 16, 2012
STEPHEN DELGIADICE said his 8-year-old daughter was in Sandy Hook Elementary when she heard two big bangs. Teachers told her to get in a corner, he said. "It's alarming, especially in Newtown, Connecticut, which we always thought was the safest place in America," he said. His daughter was fine. Robert Licata said his 6-year-old son was in a classroom when the gunman burst in and shot the teacher. "That's when my son grabbed a bunch of his friends and ran out the door," he said.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | Steven Rea
Prudery and pleasure, repression and release… Hysteria, the Victorian-era romantic comedy, is awash in such conflict. Set in 1880s London, it's the tale — inspired by historical, if not hysterical, fact — of the invention of the vibrator. And Hugh Dancy, who stars as a young doctor who joins a practice specializing in curing women of their anxieties and afflictions by tending to their "gentle areas," wasn't exactly sure what he was getting into. "It is true that there were moments when we would stop and look at each other and silently telegraph the thought What the hell are we doing?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012
"Hysteria" is an English romantic comedy about the invention of the vibrator. So who better to view an advance screening than our own romance columnists, Steve & Mia? The movie, based on an idea from Daily News Tattle columnist Howard Gensler, opens Friday. Here's what Steve & Mia had to say:   Steve: When I was single and dating, I often wondered about the myth of the female orgasm. Mia: For the women you dated, it was a myth. Steve: I'm serious. You heard what Dr. Robert Dalrymple (played by Jonathan Pryce)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Howard Gensler and gensleh@phillynews.com
I STARTED writing screenplays when I was 10 years old.   The first one was for a James Bond movie, and the producer sent it back unopened, for legal reasons. In high school, I wrote a sitcom pilot that got me a meeting with the William Morris Agency. When they saw I was 17 and heading off to college, it was a short meeting. In the late 1990s, I co-wrote the pilot "44 Wall," with my Wharton friend Milton Lewin, about a boutique Wall Street investment bank. When our pilot script received interest from Dustin Hoffman's Punch Productions, and they told us we were brilliant and it was the best pilot they ever read, I thought I was in the door.
SPORTS
March 25, 2012 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NCAA tournament forces coaches, players, and fans to experience a wide range of emotions that leave them drained by the time March Madness comes to an end (in April). But for Rick Pitino, this range is truly off the charts - like going from Death Valley to the top of Mount Everest, especially if things proceed according to form Sunday in the NCAA South Regional final. On Saturday, Pitino went through the wringer trying to get Louisville to the Final Four against Florida coach Billy Donovan, who played and coached for him and is as close to Pitino as any of his mentor's five children.
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