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January 28, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
The International Amateur Athletic Federation's drug commission has ruled Mary Slaney case will go to arbitration - five months after USA Track & Field exonerated Slaney of test results from the 1996 Olympic trials that revealed high levels of testosterone. USATF said it fully supports the outcome of its hearing panel and will vigorously oppose any efforts to overturn the decision. The IAAF's three-member arbitration panel will meet in several months, a spokesman said. "This is not unexpected," Richard Slaney, Mary's husband, said of the IAAF's decision to pursue the case.
SPORTS
January 21, 1993 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The world governing body of track and field said yesterday that it would stand by its refusal to grant prize money at its world championships, despite a threat of a boycott by top athletes. "We think the spirit of competing is what is important," said Istvan Gyulai, general secretary of the International Amateur Athletic Federation. "Can you imagine what would happen if we agreed to pay prize money? What would happen at the Olympics? We don't think sport should go in that direction.
SPORTS
April 27, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Mary Slaney was stripped of her silver medal from the 1997 world championships after track authorities determined she failed a drug test three years ago. A lawyer for the premier U.S. distance runner said the ruling yesterday by the International Amateur Athletic Federation was based on "legal fiction. " "It is sad that the worldwide governing body for the sport of track and field would choose to prop up its sham drug-testing program at the expense of one of its greatest athletes," lawyer Doriane Coleman said.
SPORTS
September 19, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Slaney, 39, may have been cleared of doping charges this week by the U.S. track and field federation, but it remains to be seen if America's greatest female distance runner will be allowed to compete anywhere during the next two years. Slaney's fate remains in the hands of the International Amateur Athletics Federation, the world governing body for track and field, whose doping commission probably will review the U.S. findings in late November. "If the IAAF doping commission believes the decision of the USATF is correct, there is no further action to take," said Giorgio Reineri, a spokesman for the Monaco-based federation.
SPORTS
January 30, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
The International Amateur Athletic Federation council yesterday passed a rule providing for stringent regulations for South African athletes - such as distance runner Zola Budd - seeking to compete for an adopted country. A spokesman said the rule, which must be approved by the 182 member countries at the IAAF congress in September, bars South African athletes who emigrate from all competition for a year and restricts them to domestic meets for another year. They also must renounce their South African citizenship and not spend more than three months each year in their native land, the IAAF spokesman said.
SPORTS
February 5, 1993 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His height and stride length are hardly suited to the tight turns and short straights of an indoor track, but when Butch Reynolds runs the 400 meters tonight at Madison Square Garden, it could be his easiest battle in months. Reynolds' competition in the 86th Millrose Games will include Kevin Young, the 1992 Olympic champion and world-record holder for the 400-meter hurdles (46.78 seconds); Antonio Pettigrew, the 1991 outdoor 400 world champion, and Antonio McKay, a six-time Millrose winner who set the Garden record of 46.55 seconds in 1988.
SPORTS
August 11, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Butch Reynolds, who defied track and field's international governing body by running in the U.S. Olympic trials, has been hit with a longer suspension. The International Amateur Athletic Federation council said yesterday that it had voted to extend the suspension of the 400-meter world-record holder an additional 4 1/2 months, through Dec. 31, for bringing track and field "into disrepute. " The suspension had been scheduled to expire today. Reynolds was suspended Aug. 12, 1990, for allegedly testing positive for steroids at a meet in Monte Carlo, Monaco, but defied the ban by competing in the Olympic trials in New Orleans in June.
SPORTS
July 15, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Discus thrower Kamy Keshmiri, a top U.S. hope for an Olympic gold medal, was banned from international competition yesterday by the International Amateur Athletic Federation because of a positive steroid test. The ruling, announced in London, means that Keshmiri will not be allowed to compete in the Barcelona Olympics, which will begin on July 25. Though Keshmiri has the right to appeal, a hearing probably would not be held until after the Olympics. United States Olympic Committee spokesman Mike Moran said Keshmiri would first have to appeal to The Athletics Congress, track and field's governing body in the United States; then he could appeal to the IAAF.
SPORTS
June 29, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
German sprinter Katrin Krabbe was cleared yesterday to run in the Barcelona Olympics as track and field's world governing body lifted a four-year suspension for alleged drug-test manipulation. "I'm free," said Krabbe, the world champion in the 100 and 200 meters, at the end of a two-day hearing before a panel of the International Amateur Athletic Federation. Krabbe, 22, and teammates Silke Moeller and Grit Breuer were banned for four years by the German track federation, or DLV, in February after allegedly providing identical urine samples at a training camp in South Africa.
SPORTS
December 4, 1992 | By Jere Longman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
Butch Reynolds, who has fought to clear his name of allegations about steroid use for more than two years, was awarded $27.3 million yesterday by a federal judge who ruled that the international track and field federation (IAAF) had been malicious in its treatment of the suspended world-record holder. The London-based IAAF, however, continued to insist that it was not subject to determinations made by the American judicial system. What this means is that a legal battle that went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court last summer is apparently not finished.
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SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | Daily News staff and wire reports
THE RUSSIAN Anti-Doping Agency suspended one of the country's top race-walking officials yesterday in connection with a major doping investigation. Viktor Kolesnikov is a director of Russia's race-walking center in the city of Saransk. The center has turned Russia into the dominant country in the sport, but has also seen at least 17 of its athletes banned or suspended for doping. Some of the athletes affected include Olympic 20-kilometer champion Elena Lashmanova , banned for 2 years in June, and Stanislav Emelyanov , stripped of his 2010 European gold medal last month.
SPORTS
June 24, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
SOUTH AFRICA'S Olympic committee suspended the troubled national track federation yesterday and said athletes like Caster Semenya would not be able to compete at the Olympics or Commonwealth Games until the problems were resolved. The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee said it had now "cut ties" with Athletics South Africa, which had been put under administration this year but defied that order Saturday by reinstating its own board. The battle between SASCOC and ASA is also complicated by the apparent support for the track federation from international athletics body IAAF, which still considers ASA to be in charge of South African track and field.
SPORTS
March 29, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE IAAF, the international athletics body, said that Oscar Pistorius would be allowed to run at this year's world championships if he qualifies after the double-amputee runner was cleared by a court to leave South Africa to compete in track meets. The Olympic athlete had appealed against some of his bail conditions, and a judge ruled Thursday that Pistorius can travel outside of South Africa to run, but with certain conditions. Pistorius is charged with murder in the shooting death of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget about the $1,000 her sister had wired from Ireland, police told Angela Mohan. It's gone. Maybe the Broomall fitness instructor would get back the wallet she lost at the King of Prussia Mall, they said. But even if she did, her chances of getting the $1,000 inside it were akin to winning the Powerball or Mega Millions lotteries. "I said OK, I'm down a thousand," said Mohan, in a brogue that highlights her Irish roots. "But my credit cards, my license. My life is in that wallet.
SPORTS
August 9, 2012 | BY JOHN SMALLWOOD, Daily News Sports Columnist
HOW MUCH humiliation and shame did Caster Semenya endure? As she took to the track at the Olympic Stadium on Wednesday for her heat in the women's 800 meters, could anyone blame Semenya if she felt her fight to compete in the 2012 London Games was the most degrading of all Olympians? It unquestionably was. The 800-meter runner from South Africa knew she was a woman, always had been a woman. But suddenly, after she won the 2009 African Junior Championships in the 800, here was the International Association of Athletics Federations telling Semenya that she had to prove she was a woman by undergoing a gender test.
SPORTS
April 19, 2011 | Associated Press
BOSTON - Kenya's Geoffrey Mutai ran the fastest 26.2 miles in history to win the Boston Marathon on Monday. Then his claim to a world record was swallowed up by the hills. Not the inclines of Heartbreak Hill that have doomed so many runners before him. It was the downhill part of the race that makes his time of 2 hours, 3 minutes, 2 seconds ineligible for an official world record. In short: IAAF rules have deemed the oldest and most prestigious marathon in the world - long considered the one of the most difficult, too - to be too easy.
SPORTS
January 16, 2008
OH, SUFFER the fully able-bodied athletes. Heaven forbid they should face the disadvantage of competing against a man missing both legs. The International Association of Athletics Federations might be way behind the curve in catching drug cheaters like Marion Jones, but it sure can spot a competitive advantage literally standing in front of it. On Sunday, the IAAF barred disabled South African sprinter Oscar Pistorius from competing in this summer's...
SPORTS
November 23, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
The IAAF will meet today in Paris to discuss Marion Jones' doping case, including whether to officially erase her Olympic and world championship results. Jones' relay teammates could also lose their medals. Jones retired in October after admitting that she took the designer steroid "the clear" from September 2000 to July 2001. She won gold medals in the 100, 200 and 1,600-meter relay in the 2000 Sydney Olympics, as well as bronzes in the 400 relay and long jump. Jones has returned her five Olympic medals and agreed to forfeit all results dating to Sept.
SPORTS
July 26, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A man who threw purple dye onto the 18th green of Royal Liverpool Golf Club Sunday during the British Open was sentenced yesterday to eight weeks in jail. Paul Addison, 40, pleaded guilty to five counts of criminal damage at the Wirral Magistrates Court near Liverpool, England. Stephen Fletcher, 35, was sentenced to five weeks of unpaid community service after pleading guilty to the same charges. The two said they represented a group called "Real Fathers 4 Justice," a group campaigning for father's rights in child-custody cases.
SPORTS
March 10, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Randall Cunningham, Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith, Bruce Smith and Ahmad Rashad will be eligible for induction into the College Football Hall of Fame for the first time. The National Football Foundation announced yesterday the names of 77 players and seven coaches who will be on the Division I-A ballot. The inductees will be announced on May 16. West Chester senior Tammy Leane and freshman teammate Kathrin Dumitru set records at the NCAA Division II swimming championships in Indianapolis.
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