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Ice Cream

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NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - People who sit on the beaches of Ventnor, Wildwood, and Atlantic City - where the ice cream man will put his box down and hand over a banana Fudge Bomb without your even moving, except to find the money - might be shocked to learn that in Brigantine, people lack this fundamental Jersey Shore right. And that, for the most part, they do not care. But that, possibly as early as next week, when the City Council is scheduled to vote on a seven-page ice cream ordinance 15 years in the making, they could at last be granted the right of beach ice-cream sales.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | by Robert Strauss, For the Daily News
If they had stuck a thermometer into the asphalt in front of Duffer's that afternoon, the mercury would have probably burst through the cap. An old basketball buddy had touted Duffer's as the best ice cream palace at the Shore, bar none, and we were certainly not there to prove him wrong. Sure enough, Duffer's (Hildreth and Pacific avenues, Wildwood, 609-729-1817) didn't disappoint. Duffer's, with its adjacent miniature golf course and game arcade, goes for the old-timey feel - Tiffany-style lamps, white-shirted waiters, goofily named sundaes.
FOOD
August 17, 1986 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
It would be nice, at least from the standpoint of girth-control, to be able to unreel some spiel about how we should return to the good old days when ice cream was a rare treat, a dish for special occasions and a special occasion in itself. Goodness knows there's enough nostalgic writing about families' gathering 'round the churn, getting to lick the dasher, etc., to provide plenty of support. Unfortunately, it just ain't true. Ice cream has not just been enjoyed, but enjoyed rather routinely, for 150 years.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - People who sit on the beaches of Ventnor, Wildwood, and Atlantic City - where the ice cream man will put his box down and hand over a banana Fudge Bomb without your even moving, except to find the money - might be shocked to learn that in Brigantine, people lack this fundamental Jersey Shore right. And that, for the most part, they do not care. But that, possibly as early as next week, when the City Council is scheduled to vote on a seven-page ice cream ordinance 15 years in the making, they could at last be granted the right of beach ice-cream sales.
NEWS
July 25, 2014
I WAS a teenage soda jerk. Nowadays, I'm just . . . a vegan columnist. Obviously, I don't drink the cow-derived milkshakes I used to guzzle at the end of a shift. But I still love the creamy goodness of a tall chocolate shake, minus the original's sad backstory. Fortunately, as I've predicted in earlier columns, vegan ice creams are proliferating in Philly. I know, ice-cream cones are fun, but those of us who want to mainline ice-cream deliciousness know that the milkshake is the format that delivers.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a spring day in 1990, Rockwell "Rock" M. Groves was eliminated. To trim the budget, SPS Technologies Inc., cut his high-powered, $120,000- plus job as vice president of industrial relations. When he got the form letter, Groves, 58, read it eight times - even though he already knew what it said. He had written it. SPS, a maker of airplane parts in Newtown, had begun downsizing after a drop in business. Groves had led the way as architect of the layoffs. Then he became the target.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Once Upon a Porch was an ice-cream parlor at Head House Square. It served wonderful ice cream, and people stood in line with their youngsters just to get a taste. But, unfortunately, Once Upon a Porch didn't live happily ever after. In its place, a new ice-cream parlor evolved. Which was good. Because if you felt like getting in some cool, creamy licks, you could now venture down to Head House Square and get some at Any Thyme. Alas, the new place didn't live happily ever after either.
LIVING
January 27, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're in the makeover mood and searching for ways to jazz up a family room, here's the scoop: Featured in Barry S. Slosberg Inc.'s gallery auction Sunday are nearly 100 lots of vintage ice-cream parlor memorabilia. They include stools, chairs, tables, a soda-fountain countertop, and a complete booth with two benches, plus signs for such brands as Dolly Madison, Hershey's and Abbotts; blenders, dispensers, and, of course, vintage scoops, a popular collectible. The memorabilia comes from three main consignors, says Slosberg associate Eric Cohen, "the bulk of it . . . from a guy who had set up a little ice-cream parlor in his basement.
FOOD
June 28, 1987 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everybody loves ice cream. But this is about people who are passionate about ice cream. "Do you know what it is to have Bassett's French vanilla ice cream with jimmies on top and covered with real whipped cream?" a heart patient fantasized, struggling against the urge to cheat on his doctor's orders. "Believe me, if you have to have a last meal, you couldn't do better. " And for these passionate people, as the Dove Bar proved a couple of years ago, money is no object. Ice cream is a "feel-good" food, and while manufacturers are only too glad to put a price on feeling good, certainly no real ice-cream lover could.
NEWS
June 16, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Yardley mother had been sitting on the steps of her favorite ice-cream parlor, eating her cone and plotting. "I plan to be there at least once a week before it closes," she said later. "I'm just buying things and putting them in the freezer and hoping" that all that accumulated ice cream lasts and lasts and lasts. When the Goodnoe Farm Dairy Bar closes forever - at 10 p.m. on Labor Day - Patti Smialkowski hopes she will have enough ice cream banked in her freezer so that the parlor will not be a memory.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
The long: Jersey farm invites DIY pickers on hayrides to scoop up seasonal crops of berries, then corn (starting this week), peaches, apples, pumpkins . . . Also on site: Goats, cows, chickens, playground, ice cream. The short: Clean, complete country outing. The deal: Aim to park in the shade. Head to the market for pick-your-own tickets ($3.75 per person). Grab berry baskets. Line up for tractor (departs on the hour, more frequently when crowded). Climb into wagon. Hop off at field.
FOOD
June 19, 2015 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scene on the JFK Boulevard Bridge resembled a caravan with a culinary slant on Saturday, as 12 food trucks parked on both sides of the bridge for the Vendy Awards, the fifth annual Philadelphia iteration of the food-truck cook-off. "We were hoping to really put the trucks in a really public place," said Zeina Muna, the Vendy Awards' managing director. "We wanted to break the boundaries and do something new. " The hot and humid weather did not dissuade the crowds, as an estimated 1,000 people packed the bridge over five hours.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gary and Patricia Marino of Franklin Township have seemingly developed a "dive-in" approach to business - perhaps fitting for a couple who also go by Mr. and Mrs. Penguin. With no relevant experience, the Marinos decided on a whim in the spring of 1995 to buy a struggling roadside ice cream stand on Route 40 in their rural hometown. They renamed it the Purple Penguin and added a full menu, including cheesesteaks and hot dogs. People "thought we were nuts," Patricia Marino, 61, said this week inside the Gloucester County shop.
NEWS
May 29, 2015
WHO DRIVES through a blizzard to pick up an ice-cream cake? Me, apparently, and I'm glad I did. I'm also glad I lived to eat it. This past February, my wife surprised me with my kind of birthday present: a "Mustachio Pistachio," from the Beese Knees, a new frozen confectionery based in Powelton Village. The beautiful cake, in all its vanilla-cardamom'd, pistachio'd and choco-crunchified glory, was ready for us. All we needed to do was go get it. As we "Tokyo Drift"-ed from South Philly to West Philly and back, tires spinning and kicking up slush every time I braked and swerved to avoid plowing over bundled-up pedestrians and manic children in mittens, I couldn't help but think: Dessert better be worth it. Oh, it was. And now that the local forecast is a little less arctic, the Beese Knees is emerging from the igloo to make brain-freeze believers out of the rest of you. Kids' stuff reimagined Leave it to two Jersey Shore kids to start an ice-cream company.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Camden's Yum-Yum summers lasted from the mid-1930s until the late '80s. But fondness for the distinctive, locally made frozen treat - with its unusual "split" flavors and creamy texture - endures among folks who grew up in the city. "In the early '70s in Fairview, kids with a wagon sold Yum-Yum from a steel container with ice all around it," recalls Paul Christman, 54, a retail clerk who lives in Runnemede. "We'd be playing outside at Westfield Acres and hear the boy with the wagon yelling, 'Yum-Yum, Yum-Yum,' " says Audubon resident Lori Jean Nourse, 55, a painter.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Water ice isn't just a summer thing: "We do more sales in January than July," says Richard Trotter , owner of Rosati Italian Water Ice and its brick mixing-and- packaging plant at South Glenwood and East Madison Streets in Clifton Heights. Rosati sold 22 million water ice cups to schools from here to California, plus 100,000 two-quart "buckets" at groceries like Acme in 2014. Unlike the popular scooped ice sold from summer stands and trucks, which sits well in a chiller for a day but tends to harden rocklike in a dairy freezer, this packaged ice is mixed and sweetened to keep cold for about 18 months, so it can be stored with ice cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2014
AS 2014 COMES to an end, now is the time you begin to think about your 2015 resolutions, right? Naturally, you want a better life, more money in your pockets, and to finally shed whatever baggage you may be carrying. But the ugly truth is, when it comes to resolutions most of us overpromise and under-deliver. Not because we want to fail, but it's just profoundly and incredibly hard to change our behaviors. So, with that in mind, I say get rid of the guilt and start with small, quantifiable goals, and when life throws you the inevitable curveball, instead of giving up, resolve to get back on your game.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
EPITHETS HURLED by a surly crowd. A flurry of blows rained down on two men, singled out because they love someone of the same sex. It sounds like a scene from 30 years ago in some backwater town. But it happened Thursday, police say, when two men were walking two blocks east of Rittenhouse Square to grab some late-night pizza. "I want to find the people who did this," one of the men - whose identities the Daily News is withholding at their request - said last night at his home in South Philly.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
C OLEMAN and Ilene Poses, of West Mount Airy, founded Chilly Philly Ice Cream in 1998. Coleman, 66, retired last month from research and information management in the city's Department of Behavioral Health. Ilene, 63, is a retired special-education teacher in the Philadelphia School District. I spoke with Coleman. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Chilly Philly? A: We came back from a vacation in 1995 and learned that Breyers had decided to leave the city. That upset me because I grew up close to their plant [in West Philadelphia]
NEWS
August 22, 2014
The deal: John Cardullo got in on the South Philly act of turning fruit, sugar and water into dessert in 1945. He ran his business from a boxy brick building built for that very purpose. John's is still there, under the direction of Anthony Cardullo Jr., John's grandson. There's another John's in Pennsauken, run by Anthony Jr.'s cousin, and a third that recently opened on the Boardwalk in Atlantic City.   Where: 701 Christian St., 215-925-6955, johnswaterice.com.   Hours: 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 1-10 p.m. Sunday.
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