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Ice Cream

NEWS
July 19, 2013
The deal: Third-generation owner Christine Konowal has come a long way since her grandparents started the Roxborough ice-cream stand in 1955 offering only homemade vanilla and chocolate soft-serve. Homemade creamy goodness remains the family trademark in 21 hard ice-cream flavors plus shakes, cakes, sundaes and water ice. Konowal's sons, Shane and Sean, are the creamery's fourth generation. Details: 5461 Ridge Ave., open 11 a.m.-11 p.m. daily, mid-March through mid-November, 215-487-1920, custardcakescreamery.com . Decor: A "Happy Days" retro exterior with outside seating on benches, chairs and the parking lot wall.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | by Michelle Caruso and Jere Hester, New York Daily News
O.J. Simpson's "ice-cream defense" may hit meltdown, the New York Daily News has learned. Investigators believe the mystery ice-cream cup in the case contained slow- melting chocolate- chip-cookie-dough ice cream left by the football great's young son, the New York Daily News has learned. In an experiment conducted by the New York Daily News that put melting rates to the test, the cookie-dough ice cream dissolved far more slowly than the flavor Nicole Brown Simpson bought for herself the night of the murders.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Baskin-Robbins in Moscow? Can Kremlin Kranberry be far behind? Baskin-Robbins, which calls itself the producer of America's favorite ice cream, has struck deep in the communist world by putting its first store in the Soviet capital. For decades - at least since the Bolshevik Revolution - Russians have had a choice of flavors: vanilla or chocolate. Tomorrow, they'll have 29 more flavors to chose from at the Baskin-Robbins store that begins business at the mammoth Rossiya Hotel.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
NO BURNING RUBBER ON ROAD BURNING RUBBER Talk about hot wheels: A county road in Washington state has been closed because flames and smoke keep bursting through the surface. The smoldering road began as a 350-foot recycling experiment that used half a million old shredded tires to build up a roadbed north of Pomeroy, in southeastern Washington. As engineers ponder a solution, traffic has been rerouted from the steaming road that sometimes shoots flames. "It stinks like burned rubber," observed Clay Barr, director of emergency services for Garfield County.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By BOB WARNER, warnerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5885
WHEN THE SUN is beating down, pushing temperatures into the mid-90s and threatening worse, what's a better place to cool off than under a tent at Penn's Landing, eating ice cream? Some 20,000 people agreed with that heat-beating recipe over the holiday weekend, sacrificing their waistlines for an all-you-can-eat ice-cream event that raised close to $100,000 for pediatric leukemia research at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The rest of the week will not be so pleasant - more heat, possibly topping 100 degrees, increased humidity - and no ice cream.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last weekend in Gap, Merle Ranck got a group of men together at a factory warehouse to build a small red building and attach it to a trailer. Call it a barn-raising. The little dairy barn will be trucked around Chester County, and from it, milkshakes and ice-cream cones will be sold at cow auctions and local fairs. Call it fund-raising. With health-conscious consumers warily eyeing milk and other dairy products, dairy farmers and their friends around the state have found the best target for better sales: the consumer's palate.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
R YAN BERLEY, 36, and Eric Berley, 32, of Lansdowne and Swarthmore, respectively, own Shane Confectionery in Old City. The brothers, who also run nearby ice-cream parlor Franklin Fountain, acquired the oldest U.S. candy business in 2010 and spent 18 months restoring the faded store at 110 Market St. It reopened in December 2011. We spoke with Ryan. Q: When you bought Shane, what did you decide to keep? A: The curved-glass entry windows were broken and were restored. The interior: We kept everything pre-1940, including a 1910 cash register.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The four red-white-and-blues that fly in front of the Dairy Queen on South Sproul Road are there because its ice cream is as American as apple pie and motherhood, says owner Al Parks. Laura Miele, a mother of four, could not agree more. When she was growing up down the street, eating take-out ice-cream sundaes, Blizzards, Peanut Buster parfaits and milk shakes was part of her childhood. Now, her children are hooked. That's why Miele and other ice-cream eaters in the township are angry that the tiny store, a local fixture since 1959, will be torn down in the spring and replaced with an Arby's restaurant.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly half a century, John L. Ripley Sr. ran a delicatessen and general store at 20th Street and Columbia Avenue, where he sold Ripley's double-decker - a ham-and-cheese sandwich stuffed with pickles and red onions - old-fashioned milkshakes and banana splits, and Tootsie Rolls for a penny each. At his store, Mr. Ripley dressed comfortably in jeans and flannel shirts, and treated his customers with a no-nonsense approach. "Why aren't you in school?" he would growl at local truants.
FOOD
July 26, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Once famed for pioneering ice cream technology and the reach of its national brands, Philadelphia has been quietly reclaiming its ice cream cred, this time as a center of artisan and small-batch makers. If plain and pure vanilla was once the city's hallmark, now the rainbow's the limit: At Capogiro, with two Center City counters and a surging wholesale business, golden margarita sorbetto has joined the stable of fresh-fruit and herb flavors, along with a gelato flavored with English sea salt.
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