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IN THE NEWS

Ice Cream

FOOD
July 26, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Once famed for pioneering ice cream technology and the reach of its national brands, Philadelphia has been quietly reclaiming its ice cream cred, this time as a center of artisan and small-batch makers. If plain and pure vanilla was once the city's hallmark, now the rainbow's the limit: At Capogiro, with two Center City counters and a surging wholesale business, golden margarita sorbetto has joined the stable of fresh-fruit and herb flavors, along with a gelato flavored with English sea salt.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
The place: La Michoacana, 231 E. State St., Kennett Square, 610-444-2996. The deal: Homemade ice cream in flavors inspired by the Mexican palate, including avocado, corn, cantaloupe, coconut and banana. A small cup (two scoops) costs $2.50. Homemade frozen pops and bolis (push-ups) start at $1.50 and come in even more interesting flavors. Think spicy mango, rompope (eggnog), pico de gallo, cajeta (a thick, sweet, caramelized milk) and tropical fruits like tamarind, guava, passion fruit and nance.
NEWS
August 25, 2008 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most summer nights, you can find the brothers Berley looking like extras from the set of The Music Man, sweeping the brick sidewalk at Second and Market with corn brooms, clearing away the paper straws, lacy doilies, silver spoons and sundae bowls and chatting, real gentlemanlike, with the clientele who have made the Franklin Fountain what it is today. Weirdly hip. In these sweet, waning days of August, a line forms out the door and around the corner at the retro spot, and the tables, set in the shade of a cypress, are filled.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
When John Cooper of St. Davids went through Pennsylvania State University's ice cream course last year, he learned that in a cold economy ice cream sales get hot. With that thought and a love of food, John and Marilyn Cooper, his wife, opened Sweet Daddy's on the busy corner of Lancaster and North Wayne Avenues in Wayne last month. "We make it all right here," he said of the distinctive line of gelato and sorbet they make. Gelato, Italian in origin, is a low-fat, ice milk product with intense flavor.
FOOD
May 29, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
HAAGEN-DAZS CRUNCH BARS. Caramel almond, peanut butter and vanilla crisp. 99 cents per 2.1-ounce frozen bar or $2.59 per box of three. BONNIE: I've said it before and I'll say it again: Haagen-Dazs' premium ice cream products are not for those severely restricting their fat intake or on strict diets. That said, these new bars are made from high-quality ingredients with nothing artificial added. If you're watching fat and calories, you might try one of the many new good-tasting frozen fruit bars and frozen yogurts available - they are moderate in fat and calories and additive-free.
FOOD
July 17, 2008
You will need: 1. Chill ice cream mixture in refrigerator for 1 to 2 hours. 2. Pour ice cream mixture into sandwich bag; double-bag mixture to prevent leaking. 3. Fill gallon bag with ice and salt, which lowers the freezing point of the ice. Put sandwich bag with ice cream inside the gallon bag. 4. Gently shake the bags for 10-15 minutes, or until ice cream is firm. Remove sandwich bag with ice cream, squeeze into bowl, and enjoy.
FOOD
July 14, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
As Reading Terminal Market opened in 1893, months in advance of the great train shed overhead, teacher Lewis Dubois Bassett set up a white-tiled ice cream shop along the 12th Street windows. The trains have come and gone. So has every other Reading Terminal merchant. On Saturday, Bassetts - run in the same spot by two great-great-grandsons - will lead an ice cream festival in the market's center court, with free ice cream and games. Attendees can re-create the old-time service technique of sliding dishes along the marble counter.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Staff Writer
A car is parked in the darkness, the engine off, the lights out, the radio silent. Two shadows sit motionless in the front seat. Suddenly, the smack smack of lips. Furtive pleasure on a steamy summer night. Rochelle Wright, 26, lifts her Styrofoam cup. "Upside-Down Banana Boat," she says softly, spooning up another mouthful. Smack. Smack. As temperatures rise and spirits melt, scores of ice cream lovers head for Dairyland, a drive-thru parlor in Roxborough. The small white store with the big peaked roof has lured folks for 15 years with its cones, shakes, sundaes and floats.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
Fred and Karen's Video a la Mode, where an ice cream cone and a movie could be scooped up in one stop, was unanimously recommended for approval by the Tredyffrin Township Planning Commission Thursday night. The Planning Commission's recommendation to allow a change in use of the property on Lancaster Avenue, formerly the Colonial Village Meat Market, now goes to the township Board of Supervisors. Owners Fred and Karen Neumann said the ice cream parlor-video store would be divided in half, with tables and chairs on the ice cream side and a large, square playground for children on the video side.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
A Mr. Softee ice cream dealer, peddling his product on the hottest day of the year, was shot to death yesterday in South Philadelphia in an apparent robbery attempt, police said. Mohammad Jaberipour, 49, of Blackwood, N.J., was gunned down at about 6 p.m. as he stood in the service area of the blue-and-white truck, which he had parked at 21st and Mifflin streets. Police said that when they arrived at the scene, the truck's motor was running and the familiar Mr. Softee jingle was playing.
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