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Ice Fishing

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NEWS
January 6, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Cold weather may cause people to stay indoors, but the Chester County Parks and Recreation Department is hoping to reel in some of those hibernators for a clinic on ice fishing Saturday at Struble Lake. "Anyone who enjoys fishing will enjoy ice fishing," said Dick Sprenkle, director of the Chester County Parks and Recreation Department. "I do it and I catch as many fish during the winter as I do in the spring and summer. " Sprenkle said many people thought winter was a slow time for fishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1990 | By Janet Stanton, Special to The Inquirer
A bitterly cold January day generally sends people indoors to huddle by the fire. But this weekend you have a chance to try an activity that might change your mind about winter: Ice fishing. At the 10th annual ice-fishing clinic on Chester County's Struble Lake tomorrow, you can learn all the basics of this esoteric sport, from selection of line, bait and equipment to fish identification and ice safety. Take your down jacket. Though the clinic will take place, ice or no ice, the organizers are hoping for a cold day. "We always get more people if it's bitter cold," said Steven Jones, superintendent at Warwick, Chester County Park near the lake, "because that's part of the fun of the sport.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Ice fishing has become a hot winter sport in Chester County. Struble Lake, Marsh Creek State Park and French Creek State Park offer a steady stream of schools of cold-water fish beneath the frozen lakes. "Ice fishing is a terrific way to get out and enjoy the great outdoors in the winter," said Rich Wood, environmental educational specialist for the Chester County Parks and Recreation Department in West Chester. "The sport is becoming more popular, with men, women and kids getting out there on the frozen lakes to catch cold-water fish like trout, bass, pike and pan fish, such as perch, sun fish and walleye.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Steve Jones is hoping more people will get hooked on ice fishing. Jones, the superintendent of Warwick County Park in Knauertown, will be on hand Saturday for the Eighth Annual Ice Fishing Clinic at 146-acre Struble Lake in Honey Brook. The free clinic, which will explore the basic techniques of the winter sport, is sponsored by the Chester County Parks and Recreation Department and the Pennsylvania Fish Commission. Besides Struble Lake, other facilities, such as Marsh Creek State Park and French Creek State Park, are open to ice fishermen.
NEWS
January 17, 1988 | By Dianne Herrin, Special to The Inquirer
They'll run and cut, dip and dive, and eat the mealworm off your Swedish pimple before you can set the hook. They are the walleyes, yellow perch, bluegills and crappies that prowl the icy underwaters of frozen lakes, and knowing precisely how to snag these furtive pan fish . . . well, that's the fun of it all. It's ice fishing, and for the 50 or so sportsmen who attended the Struble Lake Ice Fishing Clinic on Jan. 9, it's an alluring wintertime...
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Ice fishing in Chester County isn't like ice fishing at frozen northern lakes, where hardy ice anglers build shacks and drive trucks onto thick, snow- encrusted ice. On Struble Lake, near Honey Brook, the sun glints off six inches of transparent glassiness. There is just enough ice to support people, not vehicles. The lake is dotted with skaters near the shore, people fishing farther out, and children sliding everywhere. Recently, the fourth annual free ice-fishing clinic, sponsored by the Chester County Parks and Recreation Department and the Pennsylvania Fish Commission, drew almost 1,000 people in a three-hour period, according to Dick Sprenkle, 44, director of parks and recreation for Chester County.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If football and video games don't cure cabin fever, there's always ice fishing. Ice fishing? "It's great fun for the whole family," said James Subach, superintendent of Nottingham County Park. The sport, which involves drilling a hole in the ice with an auger and using a rod about one-third the size of a normal fishing rod, has been gaining in popularity. "If it's a nice day, you can do some winter birding and an animal-track study, throw a Frisbee, (and) set up radios on blankets" on the ice-covered lake, Subach said.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scott Hettig seems somewhat perplexed when someone fails to see the lure of his beloved sport of ice fishing. "You watch the bobber. You change the bobber. You change the depth," he'll explain. "It keeps you busy. There's all kind of things to do. " Whatever the reason, ice fishing to Minnesotans such as Hettig is as integral to life in this rugged northland as the lakes, loons and gophers. "Some people want to do nothing but ice fishing," says Jimmy Rud, 28, of Pine Island, Minn.
NEWS
January 29, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With just days to go before the Super Bowl, the governors of Pennsylvania and Arizona last night finalized the obligatory public wager - and are using it as a tourism promotional pitch. Gov. Rendell and Arizona's new chief executive, Jan Brewer, each put up a three-night vacation package in their respective Super Bowl team cities. If the Arizona Cardinals win, Rendell has to provide, among other things, a trip on the Duquesne Incline in Pittsburgh, dinner for two at Le Mont (his administration describes the restaurant as one of the Steel City's finest)
NEWS
February 3, 2003 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the thickly falling snow of a subfreezing afternoon, Skip Auman stood happily atop acres and acres of eight-inch-thick ice, waiting for his dinner to bite. He'd been on his way to work that morning - he's a backhoe operator - when his boss rang and told him not to come in. "I said good, I'll go ice fishing. " Now, with his back to the frosty wind and snowflakes dusting his shoulders and cap ("Kickin' Bass and Takin' Names," it read), he grinned and pronounced it "a good day to come out here.
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NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like other people across the Philadelphia region, St. Joseph's University professor James Carter awoke to a frozen world Wednesday, but his reaction to the glacial cold was different than most: Eh, seen worse. That's because the respected China scholar conducts research on the frigid northeast city of Harbin, a place where the winters are ridiculously cold, with temperatures at times falling to 20 below and 30 below zero. The town is known for one thing: ice. Ice skating, ice fishing, and especially the annual International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival, where artists carve magical castles, animals, and pagodas out of, well, ice. During one of Carter's first visits, the locals told him: Don't sweat the cold.
NEWS
January 29, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With just days to go before the Super Bowl, the governors of Pennsylvania and Arizona last night finalized the obligatory public wager - and are using it as a tourism promotional pitch. Gov. Rendell and Arizona's new chief executive, Jan Brewer, each put up a three-night vacation package in their respective Super Bowl team cities. If the Arizona Cardinals win, Rendell has to provide, among other things, a trip on the Duquesne Incline in Pittsburgh, dinner for two at Le Mont (his administration describes the restaurant as one of the Steel City's finest)
NEWS
November 23, 2008 | By Valerie Russo FOR THE INQUIRER
At age 51, it's all downhill. So I put on skis for the first time and enjoyed the ride. I also strapped on snowshoes to look for treasure on a snow-covered mountain and ventured onto a frozen reservoir to see whether the fish were biting (they were). Here's how I stayed safe while having fun in Utah: The Charleston on skis. At Powder Mountain, north of Salt Lake City, I took a one-hour Learn to Ski group lesson for $55, including rentals and lift ticket. First, we glided horizontally across the ski slope on one ski; then on two skis.
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Kowmagiak Mitsima went ice fishing in April here in the Canadian Arctic, his igloo started to melt after one night, rather than the four nights he remembers as typical a decade ago. Two springs ago, hunter friends lost their snowmobile when it fell through the ice. And some Inuits are now wary of venturing to the floe edge - where ice gives way to open water - in late spring, giving them less time to hunt the polar bears and seals that...
NEWS
February 3, 2003 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the thickly falling snow of a subfreezing afternoon, Skip Auman stood happily atop acres and acres of eight-inch-thick ice, waiting for his dinner to bite. He'd been on his way to work that morning - he's a backhoe operator - when his boss rang and told him not to come in. "I said good, I'll go ice fishing. " Now, with his back to the frosty wind and snowflakes dusting his shoulders and cap ("Kickin' Bass and Takin' Names," it read), he grinned and pronounced it "a good day to come out here.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With crushed party hats and limp Christmas trees awaiting the trash collector, there lies ahead the chilly prospect of January, February and March - a seemingly endless Siberia of frigid days. However, with extra clothes and a spirit of adventure, this can be a cause for cheering. The Pennsylvania suburbs offer numerous opportunities for winter sports enthusiasts, frequently for free or at least a lot less than the going rate at a tony resort in Vermont or Colorado. Chester County's Marsh Creek State Park in Upper Uwchlan Township has a 535-acre lake that, in warm weather, is filled with sailboats, sailboards and canoes.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | By Greg McCullough, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was 35 degrees below zero as blue sky blackened over central Minnesota, and two men in T-shirts were walking on water, out to a tiny clapboard house on top of a frozen lake. They were carrying only the essentials: fishing gear, playing cards, stove fuel, gas-powered drills, and a passing concern that a foot-thick sheet of ice wouldn't be enough to keep their two-ton fish house from plunging to the bottom of Lake Norway. A Chevy Suburban passed by, and as it turned toward the relenting sun, its weight cracked the ice, sending a flash across the lake that echoed shore to shore.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four more weeks of winter? Yeah, right. Dwayne Thorpe wasn't having it. Enough already with the blizzards, he said. Enough already with being cooped up in the house watching fishing top gun Roland Martin's smiling, tanned face on his TV. Enough already with heading down Kelly Drive and looking at a river that had been turned into the city's largest ice rink. Enough already. There are fish to be caught. So yesterday, he told his boss he wasn't coming in, grabbed his tackle box, called his best friend, Meatball, and drove down to the Schuylkill, right behind the Art Museum.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | by Ted O'Neil, Special to the Daily News
They were skinheads on the run, wanted for allegedly butchering to death their parents and younger brother in their Allentown home. So what did the Fuhrer-friendly fugitives do when they arrived in Michigan at the home of skinhead sympathizers? They went ice fishing. The respite from several days on the run gave Michigan state troopers more time to close in on the beastly looking Freeman brothers, who were arrested Wednesday along with their cousin Benny Birdwell at the unfinished central Michigan home of two local skinheads.
SPORTS
September 12, 1994 | by Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
It will be like old times tonight when Mark Bortz looks across the line and through the face mask of William "The Refrigerator" Perry. They practiced against each other for nine seasons in Chicago: Bortz the offensive left guard, Perry the defensive right tackle. They butted heads on the field and built a warm relationship off the field. Tonight, Bortz and Perry will put that aside for a few hours and do battle as the Bears meet the Eagles at Veterans Stadium. Bortz knows the 6-2, 335- pound Perry will have it cranked up, playing against his former team on national TV. "The Fridge will come out playing at 190 miles an hour," said the 6-6, 290-pound Bortz, who gives away some 45 pounds in this matchup with Perry.
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