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NEWS
October 16, 1986
The Embassy of Iceland is compelled to write to you about the Oct. 5 Andy Rooney column. We have received angry letters and telephone calls about this column from many Americans familiar with Iceland and from some of the 20,000 Icelanders living in the Philadelphia area and elsewhere in the United States. Mr. Rooney admits at the outset he writes from an experience of spending only one hour and 40 minutes at an airport in Iceland between flights, and I hope your many readers unfamiliar with Iceland will read the article with that in mind.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | By James R. Carroll, Special to The Inquirer
Here, on a thin rib of black volcanic rock jutting above a grassy plain, the world's oldest surviving legislature was born. Iceland's early citizens also unwittingly made a suggestion to other democracies that sadly hasn't been taken up: The parliament, or Althing, met outside. It undoubtedly guaranteed short speeches in the unpredictable Icelandic weather. The establishment of the Althing in 930 made Iceland the first republic north of the Alps. Although parliament now meets about 40 miles to the west in Reykjavik, the ancient speaker's rock has survived the centuries and is still used when lawmakers return here once a year.
SPORTS
January 17, 1991 | Inquirer staff writers Tim Panaccio, Gwen Knapp and Frank Fitzpatrick
When Council Rock basketball coach Dennis Matika travels to a game at the school, he drives a car. After a game, Matika is the last one out and usually heads home - either alone or with his wife. When the team wins or loses, the positive or negative feeling is experienced by the players and coaches - and not necessarily the entire school district. All that is contrary to the way basketball is in Grindavik, Iceland, where Matika spent last season coaching four men's basketball clubs while on a sabbatical leave from Council Rock.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | by MARK DE LA VINA, Daily News Staff Writer
While everyone else focuses on what's going to happen to actor David Caruso, the producers of "NYPD Blue" have to figure out what to do with Detective John Kelly. They could get Hong Kong action director John Woo to work the season's fourth episode and have him die in a maelstrom of shrapnel while trying to stop the Zodiac killer. Or, if Steve Bochco and his writers need more inspiration, they could look at how past shows have handled the departure of important cast members: SHANNEN DOHERTY, "Beverly Hills 90210.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Feodor Pitcairn had been to Iceland seven times with his trusty Hasselblad cameras, capturing a wild landscape of glaciers, steaming geothermal gases, and vivid green mosses. But what he really wanted was an active volcano. Pitcairn, of Bryn Athyn, had just about given up when he got the call in late August 2014. Within days he was leaning out the side of a helicopter, orange lava spurting below. Images from that trip and the others are featured in an exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington through April 2017.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Jenna Gottlieb, Associated Press
REYKJAVIK, Iceland - Icelandic lawmakers introduced a proposal in Parliament on Thursday to grant immediate citizenship to National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, but the proposal received limited support. Ogmundur Jonasson, whose liberal Left-Green Party is backing the proposal along with the Pirate Party and Brighter Future Party, put the issue before the Judicial Affairs Committee. Six members of minority parties were in favor out of Parliament's 63 members Thursday - the last day before summer recess.
NEWS
November 14, 1986 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Quiet-spoken and doe-eyed Rod Coronado, wanted in two countries for his anti-whaling activities, fiddled absent-mindedly with a rope bracelet yesterday as he described, in militarily precise detail, exactly what it took to cripple Iceland's whaling industry last weekend: A couple of monkey wrenches and a cursory knowledge of which plug to pull. "It was easy," the lanky, dark-haired 20-year-old said. "And no one got hurt. It was an efficient, professional operation that dealt a devastating blow to Iceland's illegal whalers.
NEWS
November 6, 1986 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The U.S. secretary of state and Soviet foreign minister met here yesterday in an effort to repair their nations' damaged relations in the wake of the Iceland summit, with no immediate evidence of progress. The three-hour meeting between Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze was a "serious discussion on how to build on the full agenda discussed at Reykjavik," U.S. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said yesterday. Shultz and Shevardnadze agreed to set up a special "working group" of lower-level officials from both sides to work last night on outstanding problems, Redman said.
NEWS
October 17, 1986
With less than three weeks left to go before congressional elections, the facts about the Iceland summit are being buried under tons of campaign rhetoric. President Reagan, with ballot-time hyperbole, has charged unfairly that "liberals" are out to "chop up" his Star Wars missile defense program, and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev is pitching his Iceland postmortems as much to American and European voters as to his captive Soviet audience. What's important to remember is that it's not just "liberals" but Americans of all persuasions who are trying to weigh the gains and losses of Reykjavik.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
Council Rock coach Dennis Matika spent last year on sabbatical in Iceland, where he coached a club team, and he says he has learned from the experience. "Working with a different level of athlete, working with what is their semi-pro-type athlete, being on national TV, being in big games night after night, having a shot clock, there were a lot of things that I was able to try that maybe I was afraid to do in the past at Council Rock," Matika said. "Hopefully, that'll be something that'll just help me grow as a coach.
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TRAVEL
February 1, 2016 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
KOPAVOGUR, Iceland - In this small city just south of the capital Reykjavik, a two-lane street in a quiet residential area abruptly loops and narrows to avoid a small hill dotted with lichen-speckled rocks. The diversion seems inexplicable, but anyone around here will tell you the reason: Elves live in those rocks. There are many such spots in Iceland - houses with distorted walls, narrowed driveways, and roads suddenly split in two - all to accommodate the huldufolk , or "hidden people," Icelanders name for elves.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Feodor Pitcairn had been to Iceland seven times with his trusty Hasselblad cameras, capturing a wild landscape of glaciers, steaming geothermal gases, and vivid green mosses. But what he really wanted was an active volcano. Pitcairn, of Bryn Athyn, had just about given up when he got the call in late August 2014. Within days he was leaning out the side of a helicopter, orange lava spurting below. Images from that trip and the others are featured in an exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington through April 2017.
TRAVEL
December 28, 2015 | By Alix Gerz, For The Inquirer
'A three-hour tour? On a boat?" my brother asked with a raised eyebrow. "What could possibly go wrong?" He walked toward the gangplank ahead of the rest of our group of six, softly humming the Gilligan's Island theme song. A brisk week in November found my brothers and me, along with our significant others, trekking around Iceland in search of culture and relaxation - but mostly, the elusive and entrancing aurora borealis, the Northern Lights. We hadn't traveled together since we were kids, and I felt that seeing something really magical together would help make up for lost time.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fengur and Score were former show horses from Iceland. They loved the cold, their caretaker said. When it snowed, they rolled around in it like dogs, bucking and rearing and snorting. Fen was more reserved. He was older, 19, black and a former champion stallion. Score, 15 and chestnut, was mischievous, running off for miles if you let him. Finally, their favorite season was here. Sunday was the second day of the winter schedule, so Fen and Score started the night in their Bucks County stable instead of wandering around outside.
TRAVEL
May 4, 2015 | By Julie Reinke Hazzard, For The Inquirer
"Want to go to Iceland?" I asked my husband and 14-year-old daughter. She immediately said yes, but my husband looked at me quizzically and asked, "Why Iceland?" I responded, "Why not?" I had gotten a brochure from my alma mater, detailing an "Iceland Weekend Getaway" scheduled during my daughter's spring break in March. She had never been to Europe; this would be a good opportunity to get her feet wet. But I wasn't sure how being vegetarians would go over in Iceland, which is known for unusual food options such as rotten shark and puffin.
TRAVEL
February 23, 2015 | By Ellie Slott Fisher, For The Inquirer
When I told my Norwegian friend Lise that we were going to Iceland for New Year's Eve, she questioned my sanity. In contrast to its nearly unlimited daylight in the summer, in the midst of winter, Iceland relishes about four hours of sunlight a day. Its skies change from rain to sleet to snow in a blink, and the ground is frequently so icy that you need to add metal tracks to your boots. But even in winter, Iceland provides extraordinary vistas of ice-covered lava fields; natural hot springs as prevalent as community swimming pools; seafood so fresh it may have been caught that morning; breathtaking geysers that entertain every few minutes; tap water so clean it makes bottled water feel, well, foreign; waterfalls so majestic as to be humbling; and the piece de resistance: a New Year's Eve display of bonfires and fireworks like nowhere else in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestras draw great cachet from their geographical homes: Any group with Vienna, Berlin, or Amsterdam in its name is going to command immediate attention from audiences, even if those cities' third-tier orchestras would be lucky to match Scranton's Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic. So can an orchestra from Turkey, Iceland, or Lapland hope to be noticed at the world's busiest orchestra festival, the summertime BBC Proms at London's Royal Albert Hall? Actually, it can. One of this year's Proms winners seems to be the Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
I went to the land of the ice and snow with the midnight sun where the hot springs flow. Touching down in Reykjavik, Iceland, days before the summer solstice, I couldn't but echo Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song," with Robert Plant's ululations accompanied by images of animated kittens on a Viking ship from a viral video etched in my Internet-addled brain. I was in the northernmost capital in the world along with a WXPN World Café Live Travel Adventure. XPN's cultural trips have previously gone to Cuba, Brazil, New Orleans, and other locales, bringing members along for the recording of the David Dye-hosted World Café "Sense of Place" series.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Jenna Gottlieb, Associated Press
REYKJAVIK, Iceland - Icelandic lawmakers introduced a proposal in Parliament on Thursday to grant immediate citizenship to National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, but the proposal received limited support. Ogmundur Jonasson, whose liberal Left-Green Party is backing the proposal along with the Pirate Party and Brighter Future Party, put the issue before the Judicial Affairs Committee. Six members of minority parties were in favor out of Parliament's 63 members Thursday - the last day before summer recess.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
M ELISSA LEE, 23, of Center City, is co-founder and program development director for the Global Renewable Energy Education Network (GREEN). Based at 17th and Arch streets, it's a study-abroad program that accelerates careers in renewable industries. Lee and co-founder Mikhail Naumov started the company in 2009 when they were students at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J. I spoke with Lee. Q: How'd you get the idea? A: We went to Costa Rica and found one of the few places where you could travel and experience all types of renewable-power plants.
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