CollectionsIdeal World
IN THE NEWS

Ideal World

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
After trumpeter Arturo Sandoval left the group Irakere to go solo in 1981, some critics described him much like a Philadelphia Eagles first-round draft pick: He looked good on paper, but wasn't squat on the field. Sandoval's piercing high notes and other trumpet tricks couldn't compensate for inconsistency, they said. But now, one Grammy win (in 1995 for "Danzon [Dance On]") and 22 albums later, that "potential" has turned into skill. "Hot House" erases any doubt about the 58-year-old Cuban-born player.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | By PHILIP BATTAGLIA
I hear the social engineers from the left: "You can't legislate morality. " In contradiction to this creed, members of ACT UP, an AIDS organization, toss condoms at an 80-year-old school board director, demanding prophylactics be distributed to students to fight the spread of AIDS. Claude Lewis, in his March 7 Inquirer column, urges the school board to adopt this seemingly pragmatic solution and cater to the sexual trends of today's teenagers. In the March 15 Letters section two writers support Lewis' article.
SPORTS
October 20, 1993 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Tommy Greene glances skyward during his delivery tonight, he will be seeking neither divine intervention nor first place in the "Imitate Fernando Valenzuela" contest. Instead, the Phillies righthander will be checking the underside of the brim of his cap, where he has printed the word Aggressive. "It's just a reminder for me," he said. Apparently, the pitcher feels that if his first World Series start - against one of baseball's best lineups, before a sellout crown at Veterans Stadium and hundreds of millions of television viewers around the world - isn't enough to get his adrenalin flowing, some letters scrawled in black Magic Marker will help.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | By James J. Kilpatrick
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D., Mass.) is nothing if not consistent: He never passes up a chance for demagoguery. Last week he maintained his sterling record. He attacked the Reagan administration for failing to nominate blacks and women to federal judgeships. Over the past seven years, the gentleman observed, President Reagan has sent 367 nominations to the Judiciary Committee. Of these, 31 nominees were female, six were black. Kennedy thought this a terrible state of affairs. When Stephen J. Markman, an assistant attorney general, undertook to defend the administration, Kennedy gave him a very hard time.
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | BY DONALD KAUL
We've got one guy running for police chief of the United States while the other one seems to want to be national city manager. Both talk about our $2.5 trillion federal deficit as though it were acne, something you grow out of. Their chief communication with the American public consists of 30-second television advertisements in which they do not appear. I ask you, is this any way to elect a president? Of course not. Also, yes. In an ideal world, our presidential candidates would meet in a series of open debates to discuss the serious issues that face us - the deficit, nuclear holocaust, the end of the world - while 95 percent of the electorate listened with Super Bowl-like concentration, taking notes.
SPORTS
December 3, 1997 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Coatesville High graduate Aesha McGibboney would be providing points and rebounds off the bench for the West Chester University women's basketball team in an ideal world. But it hasn't been an ideal world for a West Chester team that has lost its first four games, so head coach Deirdre Kane has inserted McGibboney into the starting lineup. "She's strong, she goes to the basket, she's determined," Kane said. "She's what we need now. " McGibboney, a 5-foot-9 junior forward, came off the bench to score 23 points and pull down nine rebounds in a recent 64-59 loss to Textile.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
The numbers on the "m.p.h. " sign may change. But no matter what, Sgt. Arthur Williams will still be out waiting for yours to come up. Whether the speed limit in Pennsylvania stays at 55 m.p.h. or goes to 65 as it has in some states is all the same to Williams, a state police officer stationed at the Plymouth Barracks. "Personally, I don't care one way or the other which way the speed limit goes," Williams said. "All that matters to me is what the state legislature decides - that's the law. " But Brian O'Neill, president of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety based in Arlington, Va., has a definite opinion about the consequences of raising the speed limit.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1986 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1933, after the Lindbergh baby was kidnapped in a celebrated case on the other side of the Atlantic, Lloyd's of London discreetly began to offer insurance to companies and wealthy individuals who feared they could be targets for kidnap and extortion. As the world changed, so did the kidnap insurance business. Now two American companies - just as discreetly - offer coverage to a growing number of clients who live or operate overseas in what they believe to be highly vulnerable conditions.
NEWS
December 15, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 4 in the morning when the warrant squad pounds on the door in Overbrook Park. "You have a bench warrant for narcotics, sir," declares Investigator Kevin Milligan, his all-business voice incongruously alert in the dead of night. When Ronald Poindexter, 54, opens the door to his home on Drexel Road, Milligan and other black-clad members of the Philadelphia courts warrant unit crowd inside. The investigator staking out the back comes around front. The officers quickly cuff Poindexter, who is unprotesting and a touch bewildered, to take him off to prison.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Happiness is alive and swell in Ronaldo Byrd's paintings, where the party never ends - and everyone's invited. Goth punks, Girl Scouts, golfers, DJs, and urban, suburban, and country kids of every hue and hairdo are among the 300 original characters the artist, 25, showcases in his lively canvases. One painting depicts a crowd gathered around a towering stack of pancakes; another shows a clown merrily manning a turntable; and yet another, called Shipwrecked , features a motley tropical crew worthy of Gilligan's Island , or Lost , or both.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Director Krista Apple undertook no easy task in her lesbian version of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet now being presented by Curio Theatre Company. Unlike Joe Calarco's Shakespeare's R&J , which rewrote the plot to introduce budding homosexual affections between students at an all-boys school, Apple changed little. Romeo is a woman, Juliet falls in love with her, both suffer from the war between their families. The problems here don't lie in the performances. Rachel Gluck delivers a lovable Romeo, her throaty voice and aggressive mannerisms a nice foil to Isa St. Clair's lovely portrayal of innocence.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Tobias Peter is a political reporter and news editor at the K├Âlner Stadt-Anzeiger newspaper in Cologne, Germany; he is visiting The Inquirer as part of the International Center for Journalists' Arthur F. Burns Fellowship Program 'Born in the USA!"
NEWS
December 15, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 4 in the morning when the warrant squad pounds on the door in Overbrook Park. "You have a bench warrant for narcotics, sir," declares Investigator Kevin Milligan, his all-business voice incongruously alert in the dead of night. When Ronald Poindexter, 54, opens the door to his home on Drexel Road, Milligan and other black-clad members of the Philadelphia courts warrant unit crowd inside. The investigator staking out the back comes around front. The officers quickly cuff Poindexter, who is unprotesting and a touch bewildered, to take him off to prison.
NEWS
December 16, 2004 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starbucks is easy to make fun of. It's ubiquitous, cookie-cutter corporate, and - now that your grandmother gets her coffee there - far from cool. They skewered it on The Sopranos, showing a mafioso so incensed by the perceived purloining of Italian cafe culture, he steals a Starbucks coffeepot. In the movie Best in Show, a couple describe how they met, first noticing each other as they sat in separate Starbucks stores across the street. But now a bespectacled Temple University researcher wants you to think about Starbucks in a different way. Hunkered down among the caffeine-jones-ing latte lappers, risking deafness from the airplane roar of the milk-foaming machinery, Bryant Simon sits alone with his Apple PowerBook G4, chronicling the Starbucks zeitgeist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Anyone who doubts that life is unfair should check the Academy Awards in any given year. This spring proved no exception. If justice had prevailed - admittedly wishful thinking in Oscar season - Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon would have taken the best picture statuette, leaving the best foreign film award for Amores Perros. Alejandro Gonz?lez I??rritu's blistering and unrelenting vision of the underside of life in Mexico City, which will inevitably be compared with Quentin Tarantino's work, is a grim and occasionally gruesome movie experience.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
After trumpeter Arturo Sandoval left the group Irakere to go solo in 1981, some critics described him much like a Philadelphia Eagles first-round draft pick: He looked good on paper, but wasn't squat on the field. Sandoval's piercing high notes and other trumpet tricks couldn't compensate for inconsistency, they said. But now, one Grammy win (in 1995 for "Danzon [Dance On]") and 22 albums later, that "potential" has turned into skill. "Hot House" erases any doubt about the 58-year-old Cuban-born player.
SPORTS
December 3, 1997 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Coatesville High graduate Aesha McGibboney would be providing points and rebounds off the bench for the West Chester University women's basketball team in an ideal world. But it hasn't been an ideal world for a West Chester team that has lost its first four games, so head coach Deirdre Kane has inserted McGibboney into the starting lineup. "She's strong, she goes to the basket, she's determined," Kane said. "She's what we need now. " McGibboney, a 5-foot-9 junior forward, came off the bench to score 23 points and pull down nine rebounds in a recent 64-59 loss to Textile.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
The United Nations last week issued three commemoratives and a souvenir card heralding the World Summit for Social Development. The stamps have expressionistic designs reflecting themes of the conference - attacking poverty, creating jobs, and working toward social integration. The U. N. said it hopes that the summit, scheduled for March 11 and 12 in Copenhagen, will increase global awareness of the issues and inspire governments to take action. Many heads of state are expected to attend.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|