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Identity Theft

NEWS
April 27, 2016
A 37-year-old Delaware County man was sentenced Monday to 12 years in prison for his role in a scheme that stole or attempted to steal $1.1 million from banks through identity theft, federal prosecutors said. Benjamin Easley, of Upper Darby, pleaded guilty in 2014 to seven counts of bank fraud, 15 counts of aggravated identity theft, and one count of conspiracy. He also pleaded guilty to two counts of bank fraud and one count of aggravated identity theft in a separate case that was consolidated for his sentencing.
NEWS
August 6, 2015
YOUR PERSONAL financial information can't be completely protected. With the already immeasurable list of data breaches that seems to grow longer by the day, maybe we should be praying not for protection but for better interventions. Witness the recent news involving the Federal Trade Commission and LifeLock Inc., one of the leading companies in the identity-theft-protection business. The FTC has filed charges alleging that LifeLock violated a 2010 settlement in which the company vowed to stop making deceptive claims about its services and implement stronger measures to safeguard its own customers' personal data, including credit card, Social Security and bank account numbers.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
Two Philadelphia residents were arrested Wednesday and a third is being sought on charges of participating in a multistate identity-theft ring, federal authorities said. Arelis Abreu Ramos, age unknown, and Luis Raphael Rodriguez, 40, both living in Philadelphia, were arrested Wednesday. After hearings in U.S. District Court, both men were detained pending removal to Puerto Rico. A third Philadelphia resident, Angel A. Lugo Nieves, 40, was also indicted. He is being sought by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County police knew something else was amiss when they saw the driver of the car suspected in a hit-and-run crash throw credit cards out the window - lots of them. David Carroll and Rochelle Fraser, both of South Jamaica, New York have been charged with identity theft, forgery, theft and other related crimes, according to the West Whiteland Township police. On Jan. 25, Carroll was allegedly involved in a hit-and-run accident on North Pottstown Pike in Exton. Police saw Carroll's car traveling south on Route 100 after the crash.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
As victims of the recent Target card-data breach, we learned the hard way that we live in a post-privacy world. So we asked some security experts how to protect our identities now that this type of theft seems as common as stolen cars and home burglaries. Adam Levin, co-founder and chairman of IDentity Theft 911 in New York City, says most identity theft starts with incoming phone calls or e-mails. If a stranger calls claiming to be from Verizon, Microsoft, jury-duty service or a utility, don't give out personal information.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | Harry Gross
Dear Harry: Last summer, I became a victim of identity theft. It was a mess to clear up, but I think I'm OK now. My credit-card statements are all OK and so are my store accounts, but I now have a new problem. Two of the major credit- reporting companies are badgering me with emails, and one called to urge me to put me on their credit-monitoring systems. I wouldn't mind doing this, but the cost is more than $130 a year. Do I have to go this route in order to make sure the person who stole my identity doesn't do it again?
NEWS
February 21, 2013
DEAR HARRY: I'm a young, married guy whose mother got hit with identity theft a year ago. It was a problem, but it got straightened out with zero loss to her. It was emotionally aggravating, however, and she did need a visit to her doctor. I want to avoid that as much as possible. I see all kinds of ads for companies that will do that for me, but they seem to be more about boasting than protecting. There have to be things I can do for myself. Help! WHAT HARRY SAYS: The most important thing is to be alert so you can catch a stolen identity before it gets too far. Get an annual credit report from each of the major reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oh, look: a letter from the IRS. My electronically filed tax return has been received . . . and rejected. Some crook filed a tax return via my Social Security number (stolen). Hello, identity theft. Hello, faceless cyber-burglars beyond reach. It's a multibillion-dollar industry, according to the U.S. Treasury inspector general for tax administration, who pegs the cost at $21 billion over the next five years. I'm but one of millions who have had their IDs stolen. Like them, I'm now scurrying to restore my info and shore up protection against these slimy genius hacker-creeps.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marshay Harris, already charged with stealing the identities of about 35 senior citizens at four suburban retirement communities, faces additional counts of identity theft stemming from approximately 25 other victims in Philadelphia and Delaware County, authorities said yesterday. Often posing as a security guard or nurse, Harris, 30, of the 600 block of Watkins Street in South Philadelphia, entered apartments in retirement communities and took credit cards, cash, checks, jewelry and various forms of identification, law enforcement officials say. In some cases, she had master keys to the buildings, said Michelle Rotella, Delaware County assistant district attorney, who is handling the cases from several jurisdictions.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former social worker and three employees of a residential-care facility for the disabled have been charged with selling the identities of children in their care to help others cheat on their taxes - a scheme U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger described Thursday as "truly despicable. " Federal prosecutors unsealed an indictment accusing Gebah Kamara, 46, of Sharon Hill, of stealing personal information from several foster children he encountered while working for Catholic Social Services, the charitable wing of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.
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