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Identity Theft

NEWS
June 24, 2005 | By Patrick Meehan
Identity theft is making Americans insecure - insecure in buying over the Internet and telephone, insecure in providing information to health-care providers, and even insecure in storing and destroying documents. The problem goes beyond the ability of individual consumers to avoid ID theft. The most savvy credit-card user, the one who follows the waiter to the cash register to witness the swiping of the card, cannot prevent the downstream breach of privacy caused by a corrupt or incompetent restaurant, bank, or credit-bureau employee.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2007 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Greg Parks has his own take, born of years wrestling with data-security issues, on the "Bonnie and Clyde" case now playing to rapt audiences around the globe. Parks is a lawyer with the Philadelphia firm of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius L.L.P. who advises retailers on ways to avoid lawsuits and even government penalties if their databases are breached and customer information is divulged. Parks said plenty of media and government attention has been focused on preventing disclosure of customer information from commercial databases.
NEWS
August 17, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marshay Harris, who authorities say stole the identities of more than 40 senior citizens at four suburban retirement communities to fund a yearlong, four-state shopping spree, was ordered yesterday to stand trial in Delaware County Court. Often posing as a security guard or nurse, Harris, 29, of the 600 block of Watkins Street, South Philadelphia, entered apartments in the retirement communities in Bucks and Delaware Counties and pocketed credit cards, cash, checks, and various forms of identification, authorities said.
NEWS
October 21, 2003 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two federal lawmakers were in Montgomery County yesterday to promote legislation that, if it becomes law, would help victims of identity theft repair their credit ratings. The proposed legislation would empower state attorneys general to issue "no-fault letters" to the victims of identity theft who find unpaid bills attached to their credit histories. The legislation is in response to a $4 million identity theft and fraud case being prosecuted in Montgomery County involving former Limerick car dealer Benjamin J. Marchese 3d. U.S. Rep. Jim Gerlach (R., Pa.)
NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former leader of an identity-theft ring out on supervised release after almost three years in jail was back in federal court yesterday, charged with using stolen credit-card information to buy airline tickets to the Caribbean and a car for a friend and to pay for plumbing repairs at her West Philadelphia home. Nefertiti Randall, 28, was arrested by U.S. postal inspectors in 2002 and accused of leading a group that racked up almost $250,000 in fraudulent credit-card charges.
NEWS
November 14, 2007 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a time, the alleged scam seems to have worked. A Frankford man is accused of bilking Pennsylvania auto insurers out of $29,000 in 17 false claims of vandalism between February 2002 and May 2003 by using fraudulently obtained policies on vehicles he registered in his name and the name of a person whose identity he stole, the Philadelphia District Attorney's Insurance Fraud Unit announced yesterday. An additional 45 claims, worth more than $120,000, were fraudulently sought but ultimately denied, investigators said.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While some describe electronic medical records as a superhighway to better care and increased efficiency in the medical system, others worry that it could be a dangerous dark alley. "The electronic health system is not safe," said Deborah C. Peel, an Austin, Texas, psychiatrist who founded the Patient Privacy Rights Foundation. Just ask David Richardson. An acquaintance of Richardson's used the Philadelphia man's name and health insurance information to obtain medical services at several hospitals, including Hahnemann University Hospital and Chester County Hospital, according to the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
September 23, 2002 | By Larry Lewis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three Nigerians living and working in the Philadelphia suburbs were arrested and charged with large-scale identity theft within a week of each other last year. The case of one of them, a Claymont, Del., man who answered telephones at the Social Security center in Upper Darby and who allegedly stole personal information from agency computers, drew scant attention. He pleaded guilty in October. But the case against the others, a Darby Borough husband and wife accused of stealing hundreds of identities through their airport cleaning business, was mind-boggling from the beginning.
NEWS
July 12, 2001 | By Larry Lewis and Deborah Bolling INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The tall man in a red prison uniform who appeared briefly in District Court yesterday has been so desperate to keep his real identity from police that he recently tried to chew off the tips of his fingers. He stood in court, facing charges that he stole the identities of hundreds of people and ran up huge credit card bills, as Olug Bemiga Olusato. But authorities do not believe that is his real name. He had been known as Adegboyega Joshuaville for the six months he lived on Columbia Avenue and operated a cleaning business at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
December 4, 2004 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former American Red Cross data-input clerk in Philadelphia was indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury on charges of leaking the financial identities of more than 40 blood donors to a convicted robber who allegedly used the information to obtain $268,762 in cash and merchandise. Danielle Baker, 33, of Collingswood, was indicted on conspiracy and identity-theft charges in a scheme that prosecutors said involved her former boyfriend, convicted robber Harold J. McCoy 3d. U.S. Attorney Patrick L. Meehan said the scheme caused a crisis from which "the individual victims and the Red Cross are still trying to recover.
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