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Identity Theft

NEWS
January 17, 2002 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marshay Harris, already charged with stealing the identities of about 35 senior citizens at four suburban retirement communities, faces additional counts of identity theft stemming from approximately 25 other victims in Philadelphia and Delaware County, authorities said yesterday. Often posing as a security guard or nurse, Harris, 30, of the 600 block of Watkins Street in South Philadelphia, entered apartments in retirement communities and took credit cards, cash, checks, jewelry and various forms of identification, law enforcement officials say. In some cases, she had master keys to the buildings, said Michelle Rotella, Delaware County assistant district attorney, who is handling the cases from several jurisdictions.
SPORTS
June 18, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The names of 44 Phillies, including Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt and hitting coach Greg Gross, were among those on hundreds of player-agent agreements removed from the online auction site eBay late last night, ESPN.com reported. The 377 documents offered sensitive personal information, including Social Security numbers, according to the Web site's Darren Rovell. The documents, Rovell said, were one-page agent-authorization forms, saying which agent the player would be using, signed by the player.
NEWS
July 12, 2003
It's bad enough when a thief uses personal data to obtain fake credit cards in your name, and then goes on a no-holds-barred buying spree. Now just try to clear your name. As U.S. Treasury Secretary John W. Snow noted the other day, "How do you prove you are the real you, after someone else has stolen and ruined your name?" Answer: not easily, or readily. The nerve-wracking task of alerting police, credit agencies, financial institutions, merchants and other creditors that consumers have been scammed can become a full-time job in itself.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
With identity theft ranking among the most common consumer frauds today, one might think Pennsylvania is working hard to protect residents from that crime. Instead, one state agency may be enabling thieves by selling driver's license information to vendors who aren't being responsibly monitored. That fact came out in a recent state Budget Office audit of how the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation handles driver's license information, which showed that a vendor that had purchased records containing drivers' personal information could not prove how well it was safeguarding the data.
NEWS
June 24, 2005 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former resident physician at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia was arraigned yesterday on charges that he stole personal information from colleagues and used it to purchase $12,895 worth of merchandise over the Internet. Joseph C. Kim, of the 5500 block of Wissahickon Ave., Philadelphia, rummaged through his coworkers' possessions and recorded names, addresses, Social Security numbers and birthdates, police said. Kim, 29, broke the law when he bought merchandise between December 2004 and April 2005, court records say. Only about $3,400 worth of goods was delivered before security at an R.E.I.
NEWS
June 24, 2005 | By Patrick Meehan
Identity theft is making Americans insecure - insecure in buying over the Internet and telephone, insecure in providing information to health-care providers, and even insecure in storing and destroying documents. The problem goes beyond the ability of individual consumers to avoid ID theft. The most savvy credit-card user, the one who follows the waiter to the cash register to witness the swiping of the card, cannot prevent the downstream breach of privacy caused by a corrupt or incompetent restaurant, bank, or credit-bureau employee.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2007 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Greg Parks has his own take, born of years wrestling with data-security issues, on the "Bonnie and Clyde" case now playing to rapt audiences around the globe. Parks is a lawyer with the Philadelphia firm of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius L.L.P. who advises retailers on ways to avoid lawsuits and even government penalties if their databases are breached and customer information is divulged. Parks said plenty of media and government attention has been focused on preventing disclosure of customer information from commercial databases.
NEWS
August 17, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marshay Harris, who authorities say stole the identities of more than 40 senior citizens at four suburban retirement communities to fund a yearlong, four-state shopping spree, was ordered yesterday to stand trial in Delaware County Court. Often posing as a security guard or nurse, Harris, 29, of the 600 block of Watkins Street, South Philadelphia, entered apartments in the retirement communities in Bucks and Delaware Counties and pocketed credit cards, cash, checks, and various forms of identification, authorities said.
NEWS
October 21, 2003 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two federal lawmakers were in Montgomery County yesterday to promote legislation that, if it becomes law, would help victims of identity theft repair their credit ratings. The proposed legislation would empower state attorneys general to issue "no-fault letters" to the victims of identity theft who find unpaid bills attached to their credit histories. The legislation is in response to a $4 million identity theft and fraud case being prosecuted in Montgomery County involving former Limerick car dealer Benjamin J. Marchese 3d. U.S. Rep. Jim Gerlach (R., Pa.)
NEWS
May 14, 2009 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The former leader of an identity-theft ring out on supervised release after almost three years in jail was back in federal court yesterday, charged with using stolen credit-card information to buy airline tickets to the Caribbean and a car for a friend and to pay for plumbing repairs at her West Philadelphia home. Nefertiti Randall, 28, was arrested by U.S. postal inspectors in 2002 and accused of leading a group that racked up almost $250,000 in fraudulent credit-card charges.
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