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Identity Thief

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NEWS
August 30, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For two years, North Philadelphia's Darryl Brown promised people he could get them a new car even if they had bad or no credit. Yesterday, Brown could not even get himself credit for helping prosecutors convict him and 11 associates in an identity-theft ring that trashed the credit records of 59 people and defrauded 11 car dealers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey of 80 vehicles worth $2.8 million. Brown, 36, was sentenced to a 15-year no-parole prison term - the region's longest federal fraud sentence in recent memory - by a judge who said Brown "wreaked havoc on an awful lot of lives.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Movie Critic thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THEY SAY 90 percent of a movie is casting, and it's at least 99 percent of "Identity Thief. " This a flimsy road movie whose main achievement is to pair cinema's most adroit straight man with its biggest comedy wild card. Jason Bateman is the former - stoic, unflappable, with the low-key verbal dexterity that makes him a peerless counter-puncher paired with zanier co-stars in movies such as "Horrible Bosses. " Here, he shares the screen with the volatile Melissa McCarthy, a rumbling volcano of out-there energy, the X-factor in movies such as "Bridesmaids" and recently released "This is 40. " The premise, in broad strokes, plays to their strengths.
SPORTS
April 29, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A man who used Tiger Woods' identity to steal $17,000 worth of goods was sentenced to 200 years to life in prison in Sacramento, Calif. Anthony Lemar Taylor was convicted of falsely obtaining a driver's license using the name Eldrick T. Woods, Woods' Social Security number and his birth date. Though he looks nothing like golf's best player, the 30-year-old Taylor then used the false identification and credit cards to buy a 70-inch TV, stereos and a used luxury car between August 1998 and August 1999.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moments after he vowed yesterday to repay every dollar he had stolen, a South Philadelphia "identity thief" who drained the bank accounts of three victims was sentenced to three years in federal prison. "It really hurts me to know how I victimized these people," James M. Simmons Jr. told U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody. "My grandparents were not too different from my victims: just hardworking people. " Simmons told the judge, "I know I can pay that money back. I know I can make right the wrong.
NEWS
October 18, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The three men - a Philadelphia computer programmer, a North Jersey locksmith, and a Montgomery County trucking company worker - did not know each other. Nor did they know James M. Simmons Jr. Yet Simmons, 30, an entry-level worker in the financial services industry, looted their savings from the comfort of his second-floor bedroom in a South Philadelphia rowhouse. Authorities describe the case as a cautionary tale of life in the age of electronic banking, when accounts can be opened or closed and millions moved with a few keystrokes or phone calls.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
Last week and total box office in millions. Weeks    Per    Rank/Title/Studio Last Week   Total    Out   Location    1. Jack Giant Slayer (W. Bros.) $27.2   $27.2   1   $7,717    2. Identity Thief (Universal) 9.7   107.4   4   3,005    3. 21 and Over (Relativity) 8.8   8.8   1   3,159    4. Snitch (Summit) 7.8   24.5   2   3,094    5. Last Exorcism II (CBS Films) 7.7   7.7   1   2,862    6. Escape Planet Earth (Wein.)
NEWS
November 3, 2003 | By Jim Gerlach
Identity theft is one of the fastest-growing crimes in the United States. About 9.9 million Americans were victimized by identity thieves in 2002, and numerous cases of identity theft have occurred in Southeastern Pennsylvania. This issue was most recently brought to my attention by Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr., who is prosecuting a case in which an auto dealer allegedly forged fraudulent car-loan applications with former customers' personal information.
NEWS
September 6, 2010
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (1 p.m., NBC10) - Katherine Heigl; Nick Cannon; 7-year-old Preston Scarborough. How I Met Your Mother (8 p.m., CBS3) - As the show logs its 100th episode, Barney debates giving up wearing suits to land an attractive bartender, a conundrum that leads the cast to perform an awesome musical number Rachel Bilson and Tim Gunn guest star. Little People, Big World (8 p.m., TLC) - As season six opens, Matt Roloff, who is recovering from a serious health scare, resolves to lead his family on a quest to live life to the fullest.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whatever the weather this New Year's Day, one kind of freeze in the forecast will come as welcome news to many Pennsylvanians: a newly available "security freeze" for their credit reports, designed to help them thwart identity thieves. The state's new law, signed by Gov. Rendell in November and similar to laws already on the books in New Jersey and other states, is aimed at a problem fueled by the growth in "instant credit" available from retailers, auto dealers, cell-phone companies, and other businesses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
Last week and total box office in millions. Weeks    Per    Rank/Title/Studio Last Week   Total    Out   Location    1. Jack Giant Slayer (W. Bros.) $27.2   $27.2   1   $7,717    2. Identity Thief (Universal) 9.7   107.4   4   3,005    3. 21 and Over (Relativity) 8.8   8.8   1   3,159    4. Snitch (Summit) 7.8   24.5   2   3,094    5. Last Exorcism II (CBS Films) 7.7   7.7   1   2,862    6. Escape Planet Earth (Wein.)
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Movie Critic thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THEY SAY 90 percent of a movie is casting, and it's at least 99 percent of "Identity Thief. " This a flimsy road movie whose main achievement is to pair cinema's most adroit straight man with its biggest comedy wild card. Jason Bateman is the former - stoic, unflappable, with the low-key verbal dexterity that makes him a peerless counter-puncher paired with zanier co-stars in movies such as "Horrible Bosses. " Here, he shares the screen with the volatile Melissa McCarthy, a rumbling volcano of out-there energy, the X-factor in movies such as "Bridesmaids" and recently released "This is 40. " The premise, in broad strokes, plays to their strengths.
NEWS
September 6, 2010
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (1 p.m., NBC10) - Katherine Heigl; Nick Cannon; 7-year-old Preston Scarborough. How I Met Your Mother (8 p.m., CBS3) - As the show logs its 100th episode, Barney debates giving up wearing suits to land an attractive bartender, a conundrum that leads the cast to perform an awesome musical number Rachel Bilson and Tim Gunn guest star. Little People, Big World (8 p.m., TLC) - As season six opens, Matt Roloff, who is recovering from a serious health scare, resolves to lead his family on a quest to live life to the fullest.
NEWS
July 4, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The unusual news of a Thomas Parkin caught in New York impersonating his dead mother to collect her Social Security struck Thomas Parkin of Plymouth Meeting uncomfortably close to home. Almost a decade ago, the Pennsylvania Parkin reported his identity stolen - and the pattern of fraudulent finances over the years turned out to match details in news stories about the Parkin who impersonated his own mother. Pennsylvania's Parkin contacted New York prosecutors, who are investigating whether the New York Parkin, 49, stole the identity of the Pennsylvania one. The New York Parkin allegedly turned up in a Department of Motor Vehicles office in Brooklyn in April, dressed as his mother - who had died in 2003 - to renew her driver's license.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whatever the weather this New Year's Day, one kind of freeze in the forecast will come as welcome news to many Pennsylvanians: a newly available "security freeze" for their credit reports, designed to help them thwart identity thieves. The state's new law, signed by Gov. Rendell in November and similar to laws already on the books in New Jersey and other states, is aimed at a problem fueled by the growth in "instant credit" available from retailers, auto dealers, cell-phone companies, and other businesses.
NEWS
November 3, 2003 | By Jim Gerlach
Identity theft is one of the fastest-growing crimes in the United States. About 9.9 million Americans were victimized by identity thieves in 2002, and numerous cases of identity theft have occurred in Southeastern Pennsylvania. This issue was most recently brought to my attention by Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr., who is prosecuting a case in which an auto dealer allegedly forged fraudulent car-loan applications with former customers' personal information.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Like F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Philip Roth's exceptional novel The Human Stain is about a writer so absorbed in observing a doomed love triangle that he does not act to avert the inevitable. Also like Gatsby with its new-money gangsters, old-money blue bloods and hot-blooded proles, Stain telescopes an era of American identity politics into the tragedy of a disgraced professor, an illiterate beauty, and an unstable Vietnam vet. Would that I felt as passionately about Robert Benton's ambitious adaptation of The Human Stain as I do about its rich source material.
NEWS
August 30, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For two years, North Philadelphia's Darryl Brown promised people he could get them a new car even if they had bad or no credit. Yesterday, Brown could not even get himself credit for helping prosecutors convict him and 11 associates in an identity-theft ring that trashed the credit records of 59 people and defrauded 11 car dealers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey of 80 vehicles worth $2.8 million. Brown, 36, was sentenced to a 15-year no-parole prison term - the region's longest federal fraud sentence in recent memory - by a judge who said Brown "wreaked havoc on an awful lot of lives.
SPORTS
April 29, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A man who used Tiger Woods' identity to steal $17,000 worth of goods was sentenced to 200 years to life in prison in Sacramento, Calif. Anthony Lemar Taylor was convicted of falsely obtaining a driver's license using the name Eldrick T. Woods, Woods' Social Security number and his birth date. Though he looks nothing like golf's best player, the 30-year-old Taylor then used the false identification and credit cards to buy a 70-inch TV, stereos and a used luxury car between August 1998 and August 1999.
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