CollectionsIdeology
IN THE NEWS

Ideology

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 6, 2003
IFIND IT amazing how deeply ideological a few Daily News letter writers are. Ideologues look at the world in a certain way and try to shape everything to fit that view. When it pertains to politics and politicians they view the issues and candidates through partisan lenses without looking at the facts. Donna DiGiacomo: What are your thoughts on President Clinton pardoning that unrepentant tax cheat Marc Rich? This guy was indicted for evading $48 million in federal taxes.
NEWS
October 9, 1987
Secretary of Education William Bennett likes a good fight. He doesn't flinch at telling schools how to teach, parents how to raise their children and Democratic presidential hopefuls how to run their campaigns. He even dabbles in foreign policy by announcing how wonderful the Contras are. But Bennett's current battle with Surgeon General C. Everett Koop is a dangerous exercise in right-wing ideology that may wind up hurting millions of young people. Koop has been the federal government's only straight talker on acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
August 12, 1986
Acel Moore will continue to be perplexed by President Reagan's enormous popularity and dismayed by the growing number of black conservatives (Op-ed Page, July 31). There is a basic flaw in his ideology that keeps his thinking mired in the injustices of the past and prevents him from understanding the realities of the present. At the core of his misconception is the notion that civil rights legislation was intended to ensure not only equal opportunity, but economic parity as well.
NEWS
July 25, 2005 | By James P. Pinkerton
The evasive reaction of many British Muslims to the July 7 bombings in London will strike Americans as depressingly familiar. In past decades, explosions of criminal violence in the United States were rationalized as the inevitable products of racism and poverty. The solution, Americans were told by their leaders, was more understanding and more government money. Such therapies didn't work here, and they won't work there. The London-based Financial Times provided this bit of clucking context for the four men who killed more than 50 people: "immigrant families . . . often carry with them difficult memories of a colonial past that hampers integration.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
IDEOLOGY An Introduction By Terry Eagleton Verso. 242 pp. $59.95 hardcover, $17.95 paper In a society that considers Dick Tracy a major cultural figure, Destutt de Tracy (1754-1836) naturally remains obscure. Yet his legacy arguably overshadows that of the two-way wrist radio. Back in 1796, this aristocratic French philosophe coined the word ideology to describe what he called the general science of ideas. Agreeing with Enlightenment rationalists that all knowledge meant knowledge of ideas, Tracy sought to be a "Newton of the science of thought.
NEWS
June 21, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania Democratic Rep. Joe Sestak, the party's nominee for Senate, Monday called for a new era of pragmatism in government to help restore public trust in American leadership. In remarks prepared for delivery to the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco, Sestak said that it is time for reason, and clear "benchmarks," in formulating policy rather than ideology. "We owe the public what any private investor could expect: concrete proposals, clear expectations, an honest accounting of costs, and straightforward assessment of the risks," Sestak said in the prepared remarks.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
The corpse of the Dukakis campaign is not yet cold, and the spin doctors are already writing elaborate postmortems. For the next few weeks, you will hear the Dukakis swoon attributed to one aspect or another of what Democratic Sen. Terry Sanford has already called "the worst-managed campaign of this century" - the fuzzy ads, the shifting themes, the fatal passivity in the face of Republican demagoguery. "They blew a sure thing," a Democratic national committeeman groused to the Baltimore Sun. There is something to these explanations - they may have padded Bush's lead - but they miss the point.
NEWS
June 27, 1986
I must strenuously object to the June 18 editorial on U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Antonin Scalia, "Merit plus conservatism mark nominees to court. " The Inquirer states "excellence is the Senate's proper focus, not ideology. " Unfortunately, ideology, thrust into the spotlight by this nomination to the Supreme Court, must enter into the equation. Under the Reagan administration, an unprecedented attempt has been undertaken to convert the court into a political arm of an extremist agenda, which will, if permitted, damage the very fabric of our constitutional policy.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Garry Wills
Two misconceptions are deployed every time a nomination is made for the Supreme Court: 1. The "advice and consent" of the Senate is limited to the professional qualifications of the nominee, not to his views. 2. The President is free to appoint people congenial to his views, so long as the nominees are competent professionally. We have here a double standard, with the President able to consider ideology, and the Senate unable to. The Constitution says nothing of the standards by which either party is to act - which means, at the least, that it does not propose different standards.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At about 7 a.m. Monday, the bulletin went out over the Associated Press wire service: Vice President Gore wanted Connecticut Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman to be his running mate on the Democratic ticket. Within hours, Republican opposition researchers pounced. In their exegesis of Lieberman's record, Gore's new partner was ideologically closer to Texas Gov. George W. Bush than to the boss. After all, said the GOP spinners, Lieberman had supported taxpayer-financed vouchers for private schools, backed limitations on lawsuits against corporations, and was once open to the idea of partially privatizing the Social Security system - all positions at odds with Gore's.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2014
ISSUE | ENTITLEMENTS All in, or nothing Wisconsin Republican Congressman Paul Ryan's compassionate conservative ideology concentrates on federal entitlements, but neglects corporate and congressional entitlements ("Ryan's compassionate conservatism," Aug. 24). Unless all entitlements are addressed equally, we cannot consider Ryan's advocacy for reform creditable. |P.M. Johnson, West Chester Hand that fed him How disappointing to see the usually tough-minded Michael Smerconish write a puff piece about Paul Ryan ("Ryan's compassionate conservatism," Aug. 24)
NEWS
October 29, 2013
THE OCTOBER 24 editorial titled "Infra-destructers" correctly calls for an end to partisanship and quick passage of a transportation spending bill. SEPTA's recent doomsday budget means closure for nine of its 13 rail lines and a subway line, among other cutbacks. Seventy percent of Greater Philadelphia's workforce use SEPTA to get to and from work. The region's economic growth would halt under such a scenario. This fall, PennDOT issued bridge restrictions throughout the five-county region due to budget shortfalls.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Let's praise a struggling conservative reform movement seeking to disentangle the right's cause from extremism and to make its ideas more compelling to a younger and broader swath of Americans. The rethinkers are trying to engage problems that conservatives usually ignore - rising inequality and declining social mobility. And the 14 Republican senators who helped give the immigration bill a big majority in their chamber last week sent a signal that many on the right understand the need to appeal to an increasingly diverse electorate.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
While listening to an NPR report out of Moore, Okla., last week, I was genuinely shocked. Not by the scale of the devastation or the tenacity of people who have grown stoically accustomed to the damage tornados can do, but by a political sentiment that, in almost any other era, would not have been surprising at all. Rep. Tom Cole, a Republican who lives in the very neighborhood that was overwhelmed, was talking about a call he received from President Obama....
NEWS
March 20, 2013
By Gregory J. Sullivan The March 11 issue of the New Yorker contains a long profile of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg by staff writer Jeffrey Toobin. The article is in many respects an embarrassing love letter from Toobin to the jurist. Nevertheless, in its muddled discussion of constitutional matters, the article ("Heavyweight: How Ruth Bader Ginsburg has moved the Supreme Court") shows how ideology in our basic law rots what federal appellate Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III has identified as "the most basic and honorable of all judicial traditions, that republican virtue of judicial restraint.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
OK, so now what happens? We'll soon learn whether President Obama's resounding Electoral College victory buys him some good will on Capitol Hill - or whether he's destined to endure more gridlock, thanks to an election that once again revealed an ideologically fractured nation. On the one hand, Republicans should be suitably humbled by what occurred on Tuesday night. Obama became only the second Democrat in history (joining Franklin D. Roosevelt) to win two presidential races with more than 50 percent of the popular vote.
NEWS
August 13, 2012
There are two ways to run against President Obama: stewardship or ideology. You can run against his record or you can run against his ideas. The stewardship case is pretty straightforward: the worst recovery in U.S. history, 42 consecutive months of 8-plus percent unemployment, declining economic growth - all achieved at a price of another $5 trillion of accumulated debt. The ideological case is also simple. Just play in toto (and therefore in context) Obama's Roanoke riff telling small-business owners: "You didn't build that.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2012 | Jeff Gelles
From the day in 2010 that President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, a legal fever gripped much of the country. Was the "individual mandate" — the requirement to buy insurance if you weren't already covered, a key pillar of the law — constitutional? Would a Supreme Court dominated by Republican appointees toss it out, no matter what? You know how that fever finally broke. In a 5-4 decision that surprised both sides, Chief Justice John Roberts ditched his fellow conservatives to conclude that Congress and the President acted within their authority, not under the Commerce Clause, but because the penalty for violating the mandate was permissible as a tax. Within hours, the body politic was gripped again, this time with a fever bound to last till Election Day — or well beyond — over a role Roberts disowned: weighing the law's "wisdom or fairness.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Maggie Michael, Associated Press
CAIRO - The Muslim Brotherhood is trying to maneuver its way between its fierce anti-Israel ideology and the realities of governing as it ascends to leadership in Egypt for the first time in its history, while facing the key question of how to deal with the country's peace treaty with the Jewish state. The fundamentalist group's stance on the accord - opposition but not renunciation - is a telling sign of its broader style of politics. It can play down its hard-line doctrine in favor of short-term pragmatism as it looks to the long term, leaves its options open and engages in a degree of double-talk to pave the way. The stance could also reflect the group's own evolution as its new political party, whose members will be the ones actually involved in governing, gradually has to distinguish itself from the hard line of the Brotherhood itself, an 83-year-old organization whose leadership worked for decades in a hive-like secrecy because of state repression.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
Sometimes rules are a good thing Gov. Corbett is right in wanting to privatize liquor stores, but wrong to say "History has shown - as it always will - that the people, not government bureaucrats, know best how to live their lives" ("$1.6B expected if liquor stores sold," Wednesday). Did the people who resisted requiring seat belts in cars know best? Is the government wrong to restrict where people can smoke? On the other hand, government prohibition of alcohol clearly was a big mistake.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|