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Ifs

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NEWS
December 11, 2001
WHAT IF hijacker Hani Hangour, who entered this country on a student visa, had been reported and investigated when he didn't show up at the California college where he'd been accepted? Could the whole horrible plot have unraveled? The "what ifs" from Sept. 11 could drive you mad. They also drive overreaction, the category where Sen. Dianne Feinstein's, D-Calif., early call for a six- month moratorium on student visas belongs. Feinstein backed away from the proposal, which had dubious merit as an anti-terrorism tool: Student visas account for only 2 percent of the total issued.
SPORTS
September 4, 1992 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Dan Fouts spent the early part of this week playing Siskel and Ebert. Into his trusty videocassette recorder were popped tapes of Eagles games from the just-completed preseason. And the verdict was . . . Thumbs up. Not all the way up, mind you. Not with arms extended way over his head. Extended to more like shoulder level. "People want to talk about Philly being a Super Bowl contender," said Fouts, the former passing machine of the San Diego Chargers. "But when they do that, they always use a lot of ifs. "If all the ifs fall into place, the Eagles will be right there.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The banquet season is almost over for Charlie Manuel, who yearns for something other than hefty dinners and handshakes. He wistfully spoke Monday about new batting cages installed in Clearwater, then said there are many "ifs" on his roster from the lineup to the defense and the pitching. "I'm excited about our bullpen," Manuel said before the 109th Philadelphia Sports Writers Association's banquet at the Crowne Plaza in Cherry Hill. So there is that, with two weeks until Phillies spring training opens.
SPORTS
February 20, 2012
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The Phillies are a team of "ifs" this season, maybe more than they have been in this golden age of theirs. They don't know if Chase Utley can ever return to the power-hitting .300 presence he once was or what kind of year they can expect from Ryan Howard and his healing Achilles'. They don't know what to expect from Joe Blanton, don't know if Vance Worley can repeat last season's success. They don't know if John Mayberry can be as productive in a more regular role, whether Jim Thome can or even needs to play some first base.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Subpoenas and perjuries. Innuendos and excuses. Talking points and attack lines. Paaaaaughhh! All these abuses of language leave a sordid taste. Let's not speak of them. Instead, how about some palate-cleansing verbal silliness? Let's talk about flexible idioms, those pithy phrases that balance upon a fulcrum of whimsy, poised to skewer a foible. For example, when asked to confirm something that's self-evident, you might be tempted to reply: Is the Pope Catholic? Or: Does a bear poop in the woods?
SPORTS
November 9, 1989 | By Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
Welcome to "if" season in college football, the critical time each autumn when coaches and players suddenly start most of their sentences with one word. "If. " As in, "If we do this and so-and-so does that while so-and-so is doing this, and then if we can do this next week, we're in. " The attack of the "ifs" has not avoided the Main Line, where a pair of ifs would gain Andy Talley's Wildcats a share of the Yankee Conference title. No, uh, ifs about it. Villanova (6-3, 4-2 in the Yankee)
SPORTS
March 9, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On this mysterious and intriguing Phillies pitching staff, these guys could be called "The 10 Ifs. " They could be members of the best pitching staff in North America. Or they could crumble again beneath the wrecking ball of aches, pains, splints, casts, surgical knives and unfulfilled potential. With the 10 Ifs, almost anything is possible. "We could have five 15-game winners in our starting rotation, and everyone will say, 'Well, they always had the arms,' " said Curt Schilling.
SPORTS
July 21, 1991 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Rams, one of the NFL's most enigmatic teams, have even coach John Robinson guessing this summer. Blessed with a bevy of gifted skill-position players, led by quarterback Jim Everett, the Rams nonetheless dropped to 5-11 last season after going to the NFC championship game the year before. As a result, Robinson's job seemed to be in jeopardy until owner Georgia Frontiere handed him a contract extension just before the last game of the season. This season, Robinson said, "the swing on this team is bigger than any in the league.
SPORTS
January 12, 1991 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Nobody said life was going to be an uncontested layup for Penn's basketball team this season without Hassan Duncombe, even in the Ivy League. Then again, there were never assurances that things would have come easily even if the 6-7 senior - who averaged 19 points and 7.7 rebounds a year ago - hadn't left the team to concentrate on academics. Last night, the Quakers opened the Ivy portion of their schedule - the only part that really counts - with a 61-58 loss to an equally scrappy, equally well-drilled Brown team at the Palestra.
SPORTS
August 31, 1997 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some athletes talk about themselves in the third person, as if the words weren't coming out of their own mouths: John Q. Quarterback will do what he has to do. Others slip into the first-person plural, as if they were speaking on behalf of a large group: Retirement is something we're going to think about after the season. And then there is Ty Detmer, who has broken new ground by talking about himself in the second person. It's as if the Eagles' starting quarterback is so worried about sounding self-absorbed that he's throwing his voice.
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NEWS
June 30, 2015 | BY MADISON T. SHOCKLEY II
THIRTY-FIVE years ago, the foremost American comedian of his day, Richard Pryor, returned from his first visit to Kenya and declared that he would never again call another black person "n-----" or use the word in his public performances. He sparked a movement that gained near universal affirmation if not participation. In time, it seemed that the euphemism "n-word" had vanquished its dark shadow. Then President Obama spoke the word "n-----" out loud in a podcast interview aired this week.
SPORTS
June 20, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
For a moment, assume the worst for Sam Bradford. Picture him at Lambeau Field on Aug. 29, dropping back to pass against the Packers during the Eagles' third preseason game. The third exhibition game is a team's most important preseason game. It's the dress rehearsal for the regular season. It's Bradford's best chance, maybe his only chance before the final score starts to matter, to answer the questions about whether, after tearing his left anterior cruciate ligament twice in a 10-month span, he can make Chip Kelly's offense purr like a Ferrari 458 over 16 games.
SPORTS
June 19, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
This may sound odd, but the Phillies need to be more in a rush to hire rather than fire right now. It's time for a new club president to take a long look at all that needs to change. Current president Pat Gillick was unavailable for comment Wednesday and it's reasonable to believe that he was in the process of completing a deal to bring on Andy MacPhail as his replacement. CSNPhilly reported Monday that the Phillies have targeted MacPhail, a baseball lifer with an impressive resumé as a general manager and team president.
SPORTS
June 11, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
SOON AFTER he was hired to run the Chicago Cubs in the fall of 2011, Theo Epstein named Dale Sveum to be his manager. As the Brewers' hitting coach, Sveum had a reputation not just for developing young hitters, but for being a tough, no-nonsense type and requiring accountability from those who played for him. The Cubs needed that discipline as their organizational philosophy veered toward perennial restocking and patience, much as the Phillies have...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
A funny thing happened on the way to the 21st century: The definition and importance of marriage shifted, gayness came out of the shadows and proliferated in public, pop cultural, and political life, and Stephen Sondheim and George Furth's Company turned into a period piece. Bucks County Playhouse's current production brings out the bright side of single-and-searching 35-year-old Bobby-baby-bubi and his well-intentioned married friends. But not even the casting of Bucks County celeb Justin Guarini in that central role can mask the fact that the time may have passed for this version of the show.
NEWS
May 28, 2015
WE KNEW we were being naïve when we imagined that City Council would come back from the last week's campaigning and roll up its sleeves to address the hard issues of school funding in Philadelphia. Any one of the issues would have been fine: how to come up with the $105 million the district requested of the city, how to fill the $85 million deficit, the erosion of essentials like school nurses and books, or maybe the discouraging disparity - 33 percent, according to a recent study - between funding for rich districts vs. poor ones like ours.
SPORTS
May 27, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It's no wonder the players on the Tampa Bay Lightning have respected and responded to Jon Cooper, now in his second full season as head coach. They can look behind their bench and know the guy standing there was a great player in his time, a four-year letterman at Hofstra University . . . in lacrosse. And it's far from a shock that the Anaheim Ducks have gotten deep into the conference finals this season because they have a coach in Bruce Boudreau who played for 20 years, all but 141 games in the minors, then needed 15 years as a minor-league coach before getting his shot in the NHL. This is his eighth season in the NHL and the first time he has gotten a team beyond the second round of the playoffs.
SPORTS
May 21, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
THE OTHER big news in Grand Forks on Monday was that the University of North Dakota quickly found its new coach, a guy who had been a well-regarded assistant coach at both the NHL level and at the college level, a guy who had logged 241 games in the NHL and who has gained renown for developing young defensemen. North Dakota promoted Dave Hakstol's 50-year-old assistant, Brad Berry. If you're trying to figure out why Flyers general manager Ron Hextall, weaned entirely under the traditional hockey substructure as both a player and administrator, would reach into college for his all-important first coaching hire, start there.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Legislation that would create a state-run system for low-performing Pennsylvania schools could devastate the Philadelphia School District, its superintendent told the Senate Education Committee in Harrisburg on Wednesday. William R. Hite Jr. said he favors accountability for additional funds he seeks for Philadelphia. But as written, a bill that would compel struggling schools across the state to improve rapidly or face relegation to a new state-administered system would "create an unfunded turnaround mandate, resulting in the stripping out of supports and programs from schools left under district control," he said.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
For Pat O'Brien, Feb. 15 was just another winter Sunday. The Huntingdon Valley nurse had always had job-based health insurance. So she didn't realize Feb. 15 was the last day to buy Affordable Care Act marketplace coverage for 2015. But on that unseasonably warm day, O'Brien and her husband, Joe, a retired police officer, needed health insurance. Two weeks earlier, O'Brien had lost her job, and with it, their benefits. "I had no idea, because I didn't need it," said O'Brien, 60. "I've had insurance my whole life.
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