FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 16, 1988 | By Renee V. Lucas, Daily News Staff Writer
Oops. Sorry. We goofed. That's the message IKEA customers received this month when the Swedish furniture store reissued 17,000 of the 1 million catalogs mailed to the Philadelphia area last month. The reason? Some of the prices listed in the catalog were just too high. "We found out that an error at the printer and bindery had resulted in a pallet-load of pages with Canadian prices being inserted into the U.S. catalogs," said Ikea spokesperson Fran Novelli. The errors slipped through the store's quality-control department and winged their way into customer's homes.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Bob Eisberg contributed to this report.)
Philadelphia is making a push to furnish a location for a big Ikea warehouse and distribution facility needed to service the company's growing string of U.S. stores. Ikea, the furniture store chain based in Sweden, is shopping for land in several East Coast metropolitan areas to accommodate the complex. Lee Stull, who directs a Philadelphia economic development group, said Philadelphia appears to have a good shot at landing the project. "I believe we've persuaded them that their first preference should be the greater Philadelphia area," he said.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY and GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Two local developers have approached Ikea, the Swedish furniture retailer, with proposals to build the company a custom-designed warehouse and distribution facility in Northeast Philadelphia, according to Phran Novelli, Ikea spokeswoman. Novelli said she could name the prospective developers. Ikea had planned to build its own $21 million warehouse in the city's Byberry East Industrial Park, but in September postponed making a decision on the facility, pending the outcome of a corporate study now under way on suitable warehousing.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
The city yesterday finally nailed down a commitment from Ikea to build its East Coast warehouse and distribution center in Philadelphia, a deal that city officials say is a big economic victory for Philadelphia. The deal marks the end to the city's long and at times difficult courtship of Ikea, the Swedish company that claims to be the world's largest furniture retailer. Ikea reached an agreement in principle yesterday with the city to operate a 400,000-square-foot warehouse at the city's Byberry East industrial park in Northeast Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2011 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - A labor union looking to organize Ikea's first American factory is asking the federal government to allow workers to vote on whether they want representation. The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers filed a request with the National Labor Relations Board this week along with signature cards from what it believes is a majority of the eligible employees at Ikea's factory in Danville, Va. The plant, which produces bookcases and coffee tables, is run by Ikea's manufacturing subsidiary, Swedwood.
NEWS
November 20, 2002
THE Daily News misunderstands the role of the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority in the city and region's economic life (editorial, "IKEA on the Waterfront: Assembly Required," Nov. 11). We are not opposed to IKEA establishing a retail presence in Philadelphia. We simply question why it must be located in the very heart of the Port Industrial District. The site at Snyder Avenue and Christopher Columbus Boulevard is directly across the street from the port's Forest Products Distribution Center, a major banana import facility and one of the largest cocoa-bean facilities in the United States.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012 | By Frank Jordans, Associated Press
BERLIN - Swedish furniture giant Ikea, whose U.S. headquarters is in Conshohocken, expressed regret Friday that it benefited from the use of forced prison labor by some of its suppliers in communist East Germany more than two decades ago. The company released an independent report showing that East German prisoners, among them many political dissidents, were involved in the manufacture of goods supplied to Ikea 25 to 30 years ago. The report concluded...
NEWS
October 31, 1986 | By Gary Cohn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ikea, the Swedish home-furnishings giant, will lease a national warehouse and distribution complex to be built in Northeast Philadelphia, city development officials said last night. The $13.1 million deal, which they called a "coup" for Philadelphia, will produce 150 construction jobs and 75 permanent jobs. It also could give a strong boost to Philadelphia's sagging port traffic. "The tide has changed," City Commerce Director Charles Pizzi said last night. "We can now attract new business into the city.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
City officials said they'll continue to work closely with IKEA, even though the Swedish furniture store chain has postponed its decision on whether to build a large distribution facility in Philadelphia. The city had offered IKEA a site on a city-owned industrial park in the Northeast and arranged low-interest construction financing. It also applied for a federal grant on IKEA's behalf. IKEA never committed to building a facility in Philadelphia, but city officials confessed they believed a deal was imminent.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
Ikea is enlarging its sustainability footprint in the region with plans to add a total of six electric vehicle charging stations at its home-furnishing stores in South Philadelphia and Conshohocken, and its U.S. corporate office, also in Conshohocken. Through a partnership Ikea already has with ECOtality Inc. in San Francisco, specialists in clean electric transportation and storage technologies, the Swedish retailer will add a total of 24 Blink charging stations to eight U.S. locations beginning in July.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joining a movement toward increasing income for low-wage workers, Ikea USA announced Thursday that more than half its minimum-wage hourly workers would get an average 17 percent raise, effective Jan. 1. The announcement by the Swedish retailer, which has its U.S. headquarters in Conshohocken, came days after Gap Inc. instituted a wage increase for its 65,000 workers and a week after City Council passed an ordinance raising minimum wages for employees...
BUSINESS
April 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
As business leaders and members of a congressional task force on climate change met in Washington on Thursday to discuss how they were adapting, the Ikea Group trumped them by announcing a new renewable-energy project, its biggest worldwide. Rob Olson, chief financial officer and acting president of Ikea's U.S. division, based in Conshohocken, said the company was investing in a wind farm in Hoopeston, Ill., south of Chicago. It is the company's first wind farm, to be completed in 2015.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
My childhood home had a yard the size of a Barcalounger, but that yard took three weeks to rake. I know this because our parents "hired" their three children to rake said lawn and, by hired , I mean we were paid in hot chocolate and graham crackers. I should have remembered this when, many years later, my husband and I bought a home of comparable size but with a much larger yard. Actually, yards - front and back. But no. Real estate makes people do foolish things. And we bought the house in the spring.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
Ikea is enlarging its sustainability footprint in the region with plans to add a total of six electric vehicle charging stations at its home-furnishing stores in South Philadelphia and Conshohocken, and its U.S. corporate office, also in Conshohocken. Through a partnership Ikea already has with ECOtality Inc. in San Francisco, specialists in clean electric transportation and storage technologies, the Swedish retailer will add a total of 24 Blink charging stations to eight U.S. locations beginning in July.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Karl Ritter, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM - Swedish furniture giant Ikea became entangled in Europe's widening meat scandal Monday, forced to withdraw meatballs from stores across Europe amid suspicions that they contained horse meat. Stores in the United States and Canada were not affected, Ikea said. The company reacted after authorities in the Czech Republic said they had detected horse DNA in tests of 1-kilogram (2.2-pound) packs of frozen meatballs that were labeled as beef and pork. The Czech State Veterinary Administration said that it tested two batches of Ikea meatballs and that only one of them contained horse meat.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012 | By Frank Jordans, Associated Press
BERLIN - Swedish furniture giant Ikea, whose U.S. headquarters is in Conshohocken, expressed regret Friday that it benefited from the use of forced prison labor by some of its suppliers in communist East Germany more than two decades ago. The company released an independent report showing that East German prisoners, among them many political dissidents, were involved in the manufacture of goods supplied to Ikea 25 to 30 years ago. The report concluded...
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Frank Jordans, Associated Press
BERLIN - Ikea will release a report this week addressing claims that it benefited from forced labor in the former communist East Germany, the company and victims groups said Monday. The report by independent auditors Ernst & Young looks into allegations that Ikea, whose U.S. headquarters is in Conshohocken, used East German suppliers who employed prisoners - some of them political dissidents - to manufacture goods for its stores from the 1960s to 1980s. "We hope this will be a first step toward a broader investigation into the use of forced labor in East Germany," Rainer Wagner, chairman of the victims' group UOKG, told the Associated Press.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ikea, the world's largest home retailer, is putting the kibosh on compact fluorescent light bulbs. The Swedish company announced Monday it going all LED by 2016. LED bulbs - that stands for light-emitting diodes - are more expensive, but they consume 85 percent less energy than incandescent bulbs and can last up to 20 times longer, Ikea said. Ikea, whose U.S. headquarters are in Conshohocken, called its ban on the spiral fluorescents "another bold move" by a company that first banned incandescents in 2010.
NEWS
August 1, 2012
On Tuesday, IKEA officially plugged in rooftop solar arrays at three regional facilities – stores in Conshohocken and South Philadelphia, plus its U.S. service center in Conshohocken. The arrays have a total of 9,198 panels and are expected to generate 2,654,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year, the equivalent of powering 228 homes. The savings in carbon dioxide emissions is expected to be the equivalent of removing 359 cars from the road. IKEA has now installed solar at 29 of its U.S. facilities, with installations under way at 10 more, according to the company.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Samantha Melamed, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Naomi Stein, a Bala Cynwyd interior designer, was searching for a set of nightstands for her bedroom, she ran into a dilemma: She had a limited budget and rather expensive taste. Then she came across a blog post featuring an Ikea Rast dresser, a plain three-drawer box in unfinished pine, that had been painted, stained, and blinged out with hardware. She decided to follow the blogger's lead, creating her own elegant accent pieces from the same unassuming Ikea structure. "I figured, I can try it," Stein said.
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