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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The 1996 Hollywood film Twister introduced us to that species of meteorologist, the stormchaser sapiens. Too bad the romantic melodrama also effectively pre-empted Stormchasers, the latest IMAX offering at the Franklin Institute. For while the Hollywood movie boasted the spectacle of flying cows and whirling houses without the human factor of lives lost, the scientific study is much soberer - and, let's face it, less fun. There is no romance here to distract viewers from the disturbing fact that dramatic weather often results in dramatic death.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The giant-screen Imax format has been effectively used to celebrate both the wonders of nature and the achievements of man. In Mysteries of Egypt, we get a bit of both. At the source of the Nile, a swooping helicopter takes the giddy, Imax trademark trip that tilts the horizon as it follows the course of the mighty river. The water helped create the rich soil of the valley of the Nile and made the rise of Egyptian civilization possible. After the spectacle of the waterfalls and churning river, the camera moves to the main business - the great pyramids and tombs that are the sole survivors of the seven wonders of the ancient world.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With The Magic of Flight, Imax movie-making redefines what it means to reach dizzy heights. Even in Everest, the biggest box-office success for the giant screen process, there was the feeling that you were occasionally planted on solid ground - albeit 29,000 feet up. In the vertigo sweepstakes, The Magic of Flight, now running at the Franklin Institute, tops that climb by putting the cameras in the cockpits of the Blue Angels, the Navy's celebrated...
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Certain staggeringly large natural wonders lend themselves to the IMAX movie format - Mount Everest, the pyramids, the Amazon, the continent of Africa, etc. Today, at the Franklin Institute's Omniverse Theater, we will have a chance to properly view another of nature's curiosities - Mick Jagger's lips. Jack Flash is the featured attraction in "Rolling Stones at the Max," the first concert film shot in the IMAX format, projected on screens that are four stories high and just as wide, providing a 180-degree wraparound view of the venerable band.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There might seem to be few more hostile and inhospitable places on the planet than the treacherous ice of a glacier in Greenland. But, as Journey Into Amazing Caves soon proves, the dangers are nothing when measured against surviving 500 feet beneath the earth. "Ice has an element of unpredictable risk," remarks cave rescue specialist Nancy Aulenbach, who has a gift for understatement. She makes the observation as cavers rappel down the ice cliffs and into the bowels of the earth in search of microbes that may lead to the development of new antibiotics.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
If you want a documentary about Michael Jordan that is visually splendid, inspirational and a bit worshipful, "Michael Jordan to the Max" is your movie. If you want something comprehensive, balanced and objective, you're out of luck. "To the Max" is the kind of biography you'd expect from a movie co-produced by mvp.com Sport, of which Jordan is a part-owner. It's very much the official story - Jordan the lion-hearted, cut by his high school basketball team, the hard worker who honed his skills and became a star and champion, both in college and for the Chicago Bulls.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
By boldly taking a different direction from the usual travelogue, Amazon is an Imax documentary that brings home an oft-repeated message with renewed freshness. Any movie that makes the world more aware of the wanton destruction of the rain forests and what that bodes for future generations is welcome. But when the Imax cameras bring us the dazzling plant, insect and animal life from the high Andes to the Amazon basin, it is to argue what that loss means to human life. Plants and species are vanishing before they can be identified and cataloged.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1998 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was midday on a Monday, and only a handful of people had ventured into the Great Smokies Mega Theater here to see Everest, the wide-screen documentary that has been drawing sellout crowds nationwide. It was a start. The newly renovated theater had opened only a few weeks before, and the manager did say business had been picking up. Certainly there's no shortage of potential theatergoers in Gatlinburg. This tourist haven, filled with hillbilly memorabilia, outlet stores, wedding chapels and laser-tag arcades, is also near Dollywood, singer Dolly Parton's amusement park.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
As its title implies, CyberWorld is an attempt to take computer animation into the next dimension on the giant Imax screen. Whether it moves the genre up to the next level remains open to question. CyberWorld is more of a tantalizing work in progress that's more about future potential than present achievement. It boasts individual moments of inspiration and creativity, but their effect is lessened by the hodgepodge approach of the movie, which crams in everything from the bar scene in Antz to Homer Simpson lost in space and visual styles drawn from MTV and video games.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The new Imax feature at the Franklin Institute does what Imax does best: It doesn't just give you sweeping images, it gives you sweeping images of something you'll probably never be able to see for yourself. Kilimanjaro: To the Roof of Africa is a trek in Tanzania of more than 19,000 feet up the inactive volcano that is Mount Kilimanjaro, the tallest freestanding mountain in the world - which means that it is not part of any mountain range. The world's tallest peak is Mount Everest in the Himalayan range, which beats Kilimanjaro by about 10,000 feet.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Richard Power Hoffmann's lightbulb moment - a beautifully simple, why-hasn't-anyone-thought-of-this idea - is now being projected through the twin 15-kilowatt xenon short-arc lamps of IMAX theaters. "Watermelon Magic," the charming, 30-minute tale of a little girl (Sylvia Green Hoffmann, the director's daughter) and a patch of watermelons, was shot with his Canon 5D still camera. Hoffmann employed the technique in his 2007 shorts "Fridays At the Farm" and "Prayer For Philadelphia," winner of that year's Great Expectations: Citizen Voices on Philadelphia's Future competition (cosponsored by The Inquirer)
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | BY SEAN O'CONNELL, WP Bloomberg
WHO AMONG us can honestly claim to look better today than we did 20 years ago? Those who do likely credit advancements in cosmetic surgeries and antiaging techniques, which polish our blemishes and restore surface beauties. The same goes for "Jurassic Park. " Steven Spielberg's edge-of-your-seat blockbuster celebrates its 20th anniversary with a 3-D Imax restoration that improves digital effects considered spectacular during the film's first go-round. The enthralling man-vs.-nature parable based on the late Michael Crichton's best-selling novel hasn't aged one bit. But the upgrade allows Spielberg's larger-than-life dinosaurs to fit perfectly on today's enlarged Imax screens - and occasionally terrify audiences when those beasts reach out and appear to be going for their popcorn.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES - James Bond's "Skyfall" has extended its worldwide box-office rule to North America, hauling in a franchise-record $87.8 million in its first weekend at U.S. theaters. Adding in $2.2 million from Thursday night previews at IMAX and other large-format theaters, "Skyfall" has taken in $90 million domestically, according to studio estimates Sunday. That lifts the worldwide total for "Skyfall" to $518.6 million since it began rolling out overseas in late October. The third installment starring Daniel Craig as British superspy Bond, "Skyfall" outdid the $67.5 million U.S. debut of 2008's "Quantum of Solace," the franchise's previous best opening.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Carrie Rickey and For the Inquirer
As three film festivals converge on Philadelphia this week, movie lovers should take precautions against indie-gestion. Individually, the fests are: The 35th annual Philafilm (the Philadelphia International Film Festival & Market), which began Tuesday; the 5th annual Philadelphia Independent Film Festival (PIFF), which began Wednesday; and 4th Annual Urban Suburban Film Festival, which starts Friday. Collectively, they are hosting free events at the Piazza at Schmidts and ticketed screenings variously at the African American Museum, the Crowne Plaza Hotel on City Avenue, the Franklin Institute, and the National Constitution Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By Gary Thompson, DAILY NEWS MOVIE CRITIC
If Titanic was James Cameron's meditation on the limits of technology, his new 3-D conversion underscores the point, to a fault. The conversion was expensive - at $18 million, it cost more to make than this year's Oscar winner ( The Artist , $15 million). And it was ambitious and exacting in the Cameron tradition - he sent bids out all over the world for the best technology, and asked companies to "audition" for the job by converting the same piece of footage. The winning firm spent a reported 60 weeks working round the clock to bring the new 3-D Titanic to theaters ahead of the 100th anniversary of its sinking, April 15. The result?
TRAVEL
February 5, 2012 | By Paula Fuchsberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
VALENCIA, Spain - This ancient city on Spain's Mediterranean coast has long drawn visitors to its UNESCO-cited, late Gothic silk exchange; its restored modernist central market; its plenitude of paella restaurants; and its old-fashioned cafes serving horchata , or chilled tiger-nut milk, a smooth and refreshing local specialty. But in recent years, it's a futuristic attraction more so than the historical and culinary ones that has landed Valencia on various travel publications' must-see lists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2012
NEED NEW nudges to dive into a 3-D TV? Almost all of Chicago blows up in the sci-fi spectacle "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" (Paramount), just out in 3-D form. Also new, "WWII in 3D" (A&E Networks) using stills and movies shot by the Nazis. "A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas" (Warner Bros., out Tuesday) is the most amusing use so far of the new technology. The Royal Opera House's "Carmen in 3D" (Opus Arte) represents a most classy "first of breed. " German rockers the Scorpions "Get Your Sting and Blackout - Live in 3D" on Feb. 21 from Sony Legacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
IN THE NEW "Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol," Tom Cruise and friends traverse the globe trying to recover stolen launch codes for Russian ICBMs. It made me wonder: Are the Russians still running Windows 98? I ask because here at the Daily News , where we do not launch ICBMs, we have to change our passwords every other day, and re-enter it every time we leave the desk for two freaking minutes. I mean, if someone stole your ICBM launch codes, wouldn't you . . . change them?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2011 | By DAVID GERMAIN, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - The boy wizard has vanquished the dark knight and a band of pirates with a record-setting magic act at both the domestic and international box office. Warner Bros. estimates that "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2" took in $168.6 million domestically from Friday to yesterday. That beats the previous best opening weekend of $158.4 million, also held by Warner Bros., for 2008's Batman blockbuster "The Dark Knight. " Overseas, the film added $307 million in 59 countries since it began rolling out Wednesday, topping the previous best international debut of $260.4 million set in May by Disney's "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By MOIRA MacDONALD, The Seattle Times
At the top of the world, Conrad Anker says, the sky is a dark blue-purple. "It's kind of neat to be there and look up and know that you can't get any higher on this planet. It's the apex of Planet Earth, and you're closer to the solar system, the heavens and whatever you will, up there than you are in any other place. " Anker, an accomplished mountaineer once dubbed "the world's greatest adventurer" by Outside magazine, is talking about the top of Mount Everest - a place he last visited with cameras in tow. He appears in the IMAX movie "The Wildest Dream," which documents both the historic summit attempt made by British climber George Mallory in 1924, and Anker's subsequent discovery of Mallory's body 75 years later and later replication of Mallory's climb.
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