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Immigration Debate

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NEWS
February 1, 2012
WANT TO LEARN more about the DREAM Act and give your two cents on the issue? Sandra Shea, the Daily News' editorial page editor, will moderate a discussion at 7 tonight at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Branch, 1901 Vine St. "The Pursuit of Happiness: Immigrant Youth and the Dream Act" will feature speakers from DreamActivist Pennsylvania, the Nationalities Service Center and the Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians....
NEWS
April 19, 2006
RE DEBORAH LEAVY'S April 11 op-ed: Most legal immigrants have definitely made the United States. what it is today. Some waited years before they could enter and become legal citizens, and they had to study to do it. Certainly all of these immigrants wanted a better life. Yes, it's unreasonable to think the country could get rid of 11 million illegal immigrants by just sending them back (we know we are talking about Mexicans and very few other illegals). Some thoughts: If a child or children are born in the United States to illegal immigrants, let the parents move to the front of the line to become legal residents.
NEWS
June 12, 2006
FOR A GUY who is essentially breaking the rules over where he lives, Sen. Rick Santorum has suddenly developed an ironic interest in the illegal immigration issue. Last week the senator, who continues to trail in the polls against Democratic challenger Bob Casey Jr., got on the immigration bandwagon with two advertisements and a Internet-based campaign that pushed gutting any immigration reform package that grants what he calls "amnesty. " At Santorum's Web site the senator has launched a petition drive where people can indicate that they "stand with Rick Santorum in sending a strong message to Washington, D.C. that we need real immigration reform that does not include amnesty NOW. " And in his ads, Santorum criticizes Casey, who has said he would have voted for an immigration-reform package, defeated in the Senate, that would have allowed the majority of the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the United States to become citizens if they paid some back taxes and a $3,200 fine.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | By Charles Green, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Item: Haitian boat people by the thousands are forcibly returned to their country after being denied entry into the United States. Item: Attorney General William P. Barr takes a high-profile swing through the Southwest to announce tougher border control measures. Item: GOP presidential candidate Patrick J. Buchanan proposes building a fence along the U.S. border with Mexico and questions the wisdom of admitting large numbers of immigrants from Third World countries. Is America, the nation built by immigrants, souring on immigration?
NEWS
April 4, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Are the 12 million people living in the United States in violation of immigration law "illegal aliens" or "undocumented workers"? Or how about "global economic refugees"? As Congress and the nation continue to debate changes to immigration policy, factions ranging from the National Association of Hispanic Journalists to Rush Limbaugh are engaged in a war of words over how to refer to U.S. residents affected by the proposed legislation. Last week, the Latino journalists' group called on the media to stop "dehumanizing" undocumented workers - the association's preferred term - by labeling them "illegal aliens" and "illegals," a term the group called particularly insensitive.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In an impassioned debate laden with symbolism, the Senate voted 63-34 yesterday to declare English the national language, as it continued to debate legislation that would put millions of illegal immigrants on track to U.S. citizenship. Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid of Nevada denounced the amendment as racist and joined other opponents in warning that it could undercut long-established civil rights law. The amendment's lead sponsor, Sen. James M. Inhofe (R., Okla.), bristled at the assertion, saying the proposal would unify the nation's increasingly diverse population and would not dismantle existing legal protections.
NEWS
January 9, 2005 | By Lisa Friedman LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS
It's the biggest legend of the immigration debate, repeated as gospel at town-hall meetings, on Sunday talk shows, and even on the floor of the House of Representatives. That the 19 hijackers in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks had 63 driver's licenses among them is just not true. The origin of the false information remains murky, but the number has taken on a life of its own, fueling reams of Internet chatter and adopted as a talking point by those who say driver's licenses are not just an immigration issue but a matter of national security.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Michael Matza, STAFF WRITER
HAZLETON, Pa. - As soon as Aida Gell moved here in 2006 with her two young sons, she wondered if she had made a mistake. Born in the Dominican Republic, she had immigrated in 1987 to Westchester County, N.Y., where she drove a bus. But this old coal city had housing she could afford and a growing Latino presence. As she learned within days of arriving, Hazleton had something else: a seismic new ordinance aimed at keeping out undocumented immigrants. What Gell saw and heard that summer was discomforting for a Latina, even one in America legally.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2010
Coming This Week By Steven Rea The American George Clooney is a world-weary assassin on one last job in the Italian countryside, surrounded by quiet cafes, beautiful women, and tricky cloak-and-dagger business. From the Martin Booth novel, directed by Control's Anton Corbijn. R Opening Wednesday Machete Robert Rodriguez's Grindhouse spin-off stars Danny Trejo as the Mexican hit man, expressing his views on the immigration debate with lots and lots of killer cutlery.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) attacked Democratic challenger Katie McGinty over Philadelphia's "sanctuary city" status Monday, pivoting to local issues after a week when most attention - including some of his own - focused on Donald Trump. In an op-ed piece in Sunday's Inquirer, Toomey said he was "inclined" to support the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, but raised concerns about Trump, whose divisiveness is casting a shadow over GOP politics and his own reelection bid. By Monday, however, Toomey had turned to a flash point in the immigration debate, criticizing so-called sanctuary cities that cut off or limit cooperation between local police and federal authorities on immigration matters.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - With thousands of demonstrators rallying outside, a divided U.S. Supreme Court listened Monday as advocates argued over whether President Obama overstepped his authority when he issued orders to let millions of undocumented immigrants stay in the country. For 90 minutes, the justices pressed the lawyers and considered whether the administration policy amounts to simply "tolerating" the surge of immigrants, or grants them benefits they deserve because of their "legal presence" in the country.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Michael Matza, STAFF WRITER
HAZLETON, Pa. - As soon as Aida Gell moved here in 2006 with her two young sons, she wondered if she had made a mistake. Born in the Dominican Republic, she had immigrated in 1987 to Westchester County, N.Y., where she drove a bus. But this old coal city had housing she could afford and a growing Latino presence. As she learned within days of arriving, Hazleton had something else: a seismic new ordinance aimed at keeping out undocumented immigrants. What Gell saw and heard that summer was discomforting for a Latina, even one in America legally.
NEWS
September 1, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Promoting himself as a president who would crack down on "lawlessness," Gov. Christie has turned to a phrase that has been propelled to the forefront of the immigration debate. "Sanctuary cities, engulfing Americans in crime," the Republican governor says over footage of police cars and flashing sirens in a campaign ad released last week. As GOP poll-leader Donald Trump has accused Mexico of sending criminals and "rapists" across the border, his rivals have joined anti-illegal immigration activists in targeting so-called sanctuary cities.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
There were plenty of attacks on Hillary Rodham Clinton and President Obama in Thursday's early GOP presidential debate, featuring the seven candidates who didn't qualify for the 9 p.m. prime-time event in Cleveland. But perhaps the more revealing moments in the hour-long event, referred to by some as the "happy hour" debate, came when second-tier candidates took shots at 2016 rivals who are performing better in the polls, such as Donald Trump and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. Carly Fiorina, former chief executive of Hewlett-Packard, said Trump had tapped into Americans' frustration with "politics as usual.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
MEXICO CITY - He crossed a border that has fueled intense debate over illegal immigration for three days of trade talks in a country once home to many of the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants estimated to be living in the United States. Gov. Christie, however, has not talked much with Mexican leaders about immigration during his trade mission here, he said Thursday. And, he said, he has no interest in airing his views - now, anyway. The Republican governor will talk about immigration "if and when I become a candidate for president of the United States," he told reporters outside a taco shop, where he stopped for lunch between events with Mexican officials.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
JEB BUSH made some very provocative comments about immigration the other day. They were red meat for a conservative base that thinks in broad brushstrokes about foreigners. Actually, they were more like a bullfighter's red cape, or scarlet blood in the water. Commenting on the wave of illegal bodies present in our country, this brother of one compassionate conservative president and son of another observed: "The way I look at this is someone who comes to our country because they couldn't come legally, they come to our country because their families - the dad who loved their children - was worried that their children didn't have food on the table.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgar Trinidad Mendez no longer lives in fear. But that was not always the case for the Mexican undocumented immigrant, who came to the United States when he was 6. Mendez, 24, of Deptford, was a high school sophomore when he learned how his life and aspirations would take a different course because he was undocumented. "Since I [can] remember, I have been undocumented. My life has been consumed by uncertainty, always apprehensive about an unclear future," Mendez said. "Being undocumented is like having ball chains tied to the limbs of your body, preventing you to move forward.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of the Philadelphia Archdiocese entered the immigration debate Wednesday, saying Americans are "not licensed to mistreat anyone ... whether they have papers or not. " Archbishop Charles J. Chaput urged Congress to create a path to citizenship that was "fair, accessible, and achievable" for undocumented immigrants. "Americans have a right to secure borders. ... We have a right to exclude criminals from our country ... to verify foreign visitors and guest workers, and expect their compliance with the law," Chaput wrote in a CatholicPhilly.com column.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Philip Rucker and Sari Horwitz, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Janet Napolitano, who as President Obama's homeland security secretary has one of the broadest and most challenging portfolios of any cabinet member, announced Friday that she is stepping down to become president of the University of California system. Napolitano has been a central figure in debates over immigration and counterterrorism policies while also managing the government's response to tornadoes, hurricanes, and other natural disasters. Her resignation comes at a critical time for the Obama administration, as Congress debates a bill to overhaul immigration laws.
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