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Immigration Laws

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NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. - Ted Cruz painted a dark word picture of a nation bankrupt at home and mocked abroad, its values and constitutional rights eroding. But things are about to change, he thundered. "Everywhere across this country, people are waking up," the Texas Republican senator told a crowd of about 1,000 standing in a field at Ottawa Farms, who cheered every other sentence. "There's an awakening, and there's a spirit of revival sweeping this land. " Cruz was in the middle of a 12-day barnstorming tour through many of the Southern states that hold primaries March 1 in the so-called SEC primary, which his campaign has focused on as friendly ground after the gauntlet of early-voting states.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Kevin Sullivan, Washington Post
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - The contraption in a basement lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology looks like a high school science project, but it was developed by two post-doctoral mechanical engineers. And it just might be a breakthrough that creates wealth and jobs in the United States and transforms the white-hot industry of oil and natural gas hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. That is, as long as the foreign-born inventors aren't forced to leave the country. Anurag Bajpayee and Prakash Narayan Govindan, both from India, have started a company to sell the system to oil companies that are desperate for a cheaper, cleaner way to dispose of the billions of gallons of contaminated water produced by fracking.
NEWS
March 14, 2007 | Anthony D. Romero
Anthony D. Romero is the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union The mean-spirited anti-immigrant laws of Hazleton, Pa., went on trial Monday. That judicial spotlight will expose the laws as misguided, unconstitutional and undemocratic. The laws would revoke the business permits of landlords who do not immediately evict anyone the city identifies as an "illegal alien"; they also would shut down businesses that did not immediately fire such persons. They would require anyone wanting rental housing to provide immigration documentation to the city.
NEWS
May 4, 2010
Amid the debate over Arizona's tough new immigration-control law, two Pennsylvania legislators are weighing in. Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler) wants to follow Arizona's lead by giving state and local police the power to enforce federal immigration laws. Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Delaware-Montgomery) wants a bill forbidding the state from doing so, on the grounds that such laws usurp federal authority to regulate immigration and "encourage racial profiling. " Metcalfe, who will present his bill in a live webcast from Harrisburg Tuesday, said his "Arizona-modeled legislation" would help crack down on Pennsylvania's estimated 140,000 illegal immigrants.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | BY PAUL GREENBERG
I wonder what Sarah Greenberg would think about the latest twist to immigration laws. It would allow people to enter the United States if they have $2 million to invest and can employ 10 people. Sarah Greenberg didn't have $2 million when she got to the Port of Boston on February 10, 1921. She was 19-year-old Sarah Ackerman then and I wasn't even a twinkle in her eye. She did have a certain knowledge of the immigration laws, gained standing in line for days around the American Embassy in Warsaw.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | By Tracey A. Reeves, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Mention immigration and many Americans conjure up visions of desperate men, women and children sneaking across the Mexican border, wiggling their way into American jobs and onto welfare. It's not often one considers the northern border of the United States and how it contributes to the wave of legal and illegal immigration. According to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Canada is the fourth-largest source of illegal immigrants in the United States. And proposed changes in immigration laws, although aimed mostly at the southern border, will affect Canadians and the northern border as well.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The issues of welfare reform and immigration policy formed the meat and potatoes of this Sunday brunch. Three speakers made their cases at a Bread and Roses Community Fund meeting yesterday at a house in the city's Powelton Village section. They saw forthcoming changes in the welfare system and the tightening of U.S. immigration policy as "a general attack on poor people. " The Bread and Roses Community Fund, which disburses money to local groups seeking social change, held the discussion to "see how immigration policy and welfare reform impact on the poor" of Philadelphia, said Judy Claude, director of the group.
NEWS
April 11, 2006 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Immigrants and their supporters from throughout the region packed JFK Plaza in Center City yesterday in one of a series of rallies that drew hundreds of thousands of people in dozens of cities nationwide. At the Philadelphia rally, American flags were constantly waving and "God bless America" was chanted over and over again. Participants wore T-shirts proclaiming "Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" and carried banners with such messages as "The only people that are not immigrants are the Native Americans.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The country's economy would buckle if undocumented workers were deported, New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and a parade of witnesses told U.S. senators in Philadelphia yesterday. Their testimony at the National Constitution Center, offered during a rare Senate Judiciary Committee field hearing to discuss overhauling immigration laws, largely supported a Senate proposal to create a guest-worker program and a path to citizenship for some illegal immigrants. Meanwhile, at a San Diego border-patrol station, U.S. House members who favor a bill that would make illegal immigrants felons held their own hearing devoted to national security risks posed by ill-enforced borders.
NEWS
March 21, 2006 | By Harold Jackson
God knows Jesse Jackson likes a good march, but none of the newspapers I read mentioned him being at the massive immigration-rights rally more than a week ago in his hometown Chicago. Estimates put the number of participants at 100,000. Too bad Rev. Jackson wasn't among them. The immigration issue is important to African Americans as well as Latinos. Jackson's presence at the march might have helped steer those two communities to the logical conclusion that they should unite on this topic.
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NEWS
July 8, 2016
WHEN IN DOUBT, try fear-mongering. That's the tactic used recently by Sen. Pat Toomey, who introduced a bill to deny federal housing and community-development money to any municipality that declared itself a sanctuary city. These cities - Philadelphia among them - opted out of cooperating with the federal government's program of aggressively deporting illegal/undocumented immigrants. Toomey is following the lead of Donald Trump, the Republican Party's presidential candidate, whose hysterical anti-immigrant stance has energized the conservative base.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Offering a forum on the fate of students, inmates, and undocumented immigrants, Philadelphia City Council heard testimony Tuesday about what witnesses called "the school-to-prison-to-deportation pipeline. " Using the 20th anniversary of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act as a peg, witnesses said the landmark 1996 federal law should be repealed because it removed judicial discretion and due process from the deportation process. While Council has no jurisdiction over federal law, it can advance a resolution asking Congress to act. Councilwoman Helen Gym, who presided at the hearing along with Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, said they would do that.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | John Yoo
John Yoo is a law professor at the University of California at Berkeley and a former Justice Department official. He is coeditor of "Liberty's Nemesis: The Unchecked Expansion of the State. " The Obama administration's ongoing scandals over immigration, health care, the Internal Revenue Service, and national security share a common denominator: the inexorable growth of government. If Americans are ever to restore accountability to Washington, they must fundamentally change their approach to the Constitution and executive power.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. - Ted Cruz painted a dark word picture of a nation bankrupt at home and mocked abroad, its values and constitutional rights eroding. But things are about to change, he thundered. "Everywhere across this country, people are waking up," the Texas Republican senator told a crowd of about 1,000 standing in a field at Ottawa Farms, who cheered every other sentence. "There's an awakening, and there's a spirit of revival sweeping this land. " Cruz was in the middle of a 12-day barnstorming tour through many of the Southern states that hold primaries March 1 in the so-called SEC primary, which his campaign has focused on as friendly ground after the gauntlet of early-voting states.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
YORK, Pa. - Alma Lopez stood outside the county prison here, where undocumented immigrants are jailed pending deportation, and broke into tears. All around her, scores of activists unfurled banners emblazoned with inspirational messages, snapped keepsake photos with their smartphones, prayed, and sang in Spanish and English to support the 100 women who set off Tuesday on a 100-mile march to Washington. The weeklong trek, which organizers are calling a pilgrimage, is designed to humanize the increasingly demonized national debate about immigration.
NEWS
August 24, 2015
ISSUE | TAX BREAKS Stuck in reverse The recently unveiled plans for a new Subaru of America headquarters in Camden are extremely disappointing. They consist of two squat buildings and more than 1,000 parking spaces. We taxpayers are to give up $118 million in tax revenue so that Subaru can build an outdated, suburban-style office complex within a 13-minute walk of the biggest transit hub in South Jersey. This will do nothing to revitalize the city. That would require it to encourage interaction with the city around it, and this plan pretty much guarantees that will never happen.
NEWS
December 26, 2014
ISSUE | NATIVISM Huddled against the huddled masses At first, there was no need for laws to limit immigration. Most of the continent was nearly empty. Sailing ships were small, slow, and dangerous. But by 1890, large steam ships were bringing millions of immigrants each year. The frontier was gone, and wages fell. By this time, 15 percent of the population was foreign-born. There were deadly conflicts between racial and ethnic groups, which included riots, strikes, and lynchings.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,   I lift my lamp beside the golden door! - Emma Lazarus Even as those words were engraved on a plaque within the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty in 1903, many Americans didn't believe in them. Consequently, more than a century later, it's no surprise to find neo-nativists who feel no sympathy for thousands of Central American children who found their way to this country by dubious means.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgar Trinidad Mendez no longer lives in fear. But that was not always the case for the Mexican undocumented immigrant, who came to the United States when he was 6. Mendez, 24, of Deptford, was a high school sophomore when he learned how his life and aspirations would take a different course because he was undocumented. "Since I [can] remember, I have been undocumented. My life has been consumed by uncertainty, always apprehensive about an unclear future," Mendez said. "Being undocumented is like having ball chains tied to the limbs of your body, preventing you to move forward.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
There's an easy way to describe House Republicans' continued reluctance to pass an immigration overhaul that provides a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people residing in this country illegally: selfish. Republican former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour didn't use that word during a recent Bipartisan Policy Center forum on immigration at the University of Pennsylvania, but he might as well have. Barbour noted that, unlike GOP presidential candidates running nationally, Republican House members seeking reelection in largely safe districts don't care about courting Hispanic voters by endorsing immigration reform.
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