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Immigration Laws

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NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Kevin Sullivan, Washington Post
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - The contraption in a basement lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology looks like a high school science project, but it was developed by two post-doctoral mechanical engineers. And it just might be a breakthrough that creates wealth and jobs in the United States and transforms the white-hot industry of oil and natural gas hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. That is, as long as the foreign-born inventors aren't forced to leave the country. Anurag Bajpayee and Prakash Narayan Govindan, both from India, have started a company to sell the system to oil companies that are desperate for a cheaper, cleaner way to dispose of the billions of gallons of contaminated water produced by fracking.
NEWS
March 14, 2007 | Anthony D. Romero
Anthony D. Romero is the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union The mean-spirited anti-immigrant laws of Hazleton, Pa., went on trial Monday. That judicial spotlight will expose the laws as misguided, unconstitutional and undemocratic. The laws would revoke the business permits of landlords who do not immediately evict anyone the city identifies as an "illegal alien"; they also would shut down businesses that did not immediately fire such persons. They would require anyone wanting rental housing to provide immigration documentation to the city.
NEWS
May 4, 2010
Amid the debate over Arizona's tough new immigration-control law, two Pennsylvania legislators are weighing in. Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler) wants to follow Arizona's lead by giving state and local police the power to enforce federal immigration laws. Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Delaware-Montgomery) wants a bill forbidding the state from doing so, on the grounds that such laws usurp federal authority to regulate immigration and "encourage racial profiling. " Metcalfe, who will present his bill in a live webcast from Harrisburg Tuesday, said his "Arizona-modeled legislation" would help crack down on Pennsylvania's estimated 140,000 illegal immigrants.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | BY PAUL GREENBERG
I wonder what Sarah Greenberg would think about the latest twist to immigration laws. It would allow people to enter the United States if they have $2 million to invest and can employ 10 people. Sarah Greenberg didn't have $2 million when she got to the Port of Boston on February 10, 1921. She was 19-year-old Sarah Ackerman then and I wasn't even a twinkle in her eye. She did have a certain knowledge of the immigration laws, gained standing in line for days around the American Embassy in Warsaw.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | By Tracey A. Reeves, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Mention immigration and many Americans conjure up visions of desperate men, women and children sneaking across the Mexican border, wiggling their way into American jobs and onto welfare. It's not often one considers the northern border of the United States and how it contributes to the wave of legal and illegal immigration. According to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Canada is the fourth-largest source of illegal immigrants in the United States. And proposed changes in immigration laws, although aimed mostly at the southern border, will affect Canadians and the northern border as well.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The issues of welfare reform and immigration policy formed the meat and potatoes of this Sunday brunch. Three speakers made their cases at a Bread and Roses Community Fund meeting yesterday at a house in the city's Powelton Village section. They saw forthcoming changes in the welfare system and the tightening of U.S. immigration policy as "a general attack on poor people. " The Bread and Roses Community Fund, which disburses money to local groups seeking social change, held the discussion to "see how immigration policy and welfare reform impact on the poor" of Philadelphia, said Judy Claude, director of the group.
NEWS
April 11, 2006 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Immigrants and their supporters from throughout the region packed JFK Plaza in Center City yesterday in one of a series of rallies that drew hundreds of thousands of people in dozens of cities nationwide. At the Philadelphia rally, American flags were constantly waving and "God bless America" was chanted over and over again. Participants wore T-shirts proclaiming "Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" and carried banners with such messages as "The only people that are not immigrants are the Native Americans.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The country's economy would buckle if undocumented workers were deported, New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and a parade of witnesses told U.S. senators in Philadelphia yesterday. Their testimony at the National Constitution Center, offered during a rare Senate Judiciary Committee field hearing to discuss overhauling immigration laws, largely supported a Senate proposal to create a guest-worker program and a path to citizenship for some illegal immigrants. Meanwhile, at a San Diego border-patrol station, U.S. House members who favor a bill that would make illegal immigrants felons held their own hearing devoted to national security risks posed by ill-enforced borders.
NEWS
March 21, 2006 | By Harold Jackson
God knows Jesse Jackson likes a good march, but none of the newspapers I read mentioned him being at the massive immigration-rights rally more than a week ago in his hometown Chicago. Estimates put the number of participants at 100,000. Too bad Rev. Jackson wasn't among them. The immigration issue is important to African Americans as well as Latinos. Jackson's presence at the march might have helped steer those two communities to the logical conclusion that they should unite on this topic.
NEWS
October 3, 2001 | By Kevin Murphy and Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Canada is standing "shoulder to shoulder" with the United States in trying to reduce the risk of more terrorist attacks, Canadian Solicitor General Lawrence MacAulay said yesterday after meeting with Attorney General John Ashcroft. Canada is evaluating its immigration laws, expanding its intelligence operations, putting more money into the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and freezing assets of terrorist-connected organizations, MacAulay said. Canadian police are following more than 3,700 tips related to the Sept.
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NEWS
July 22, 2014
Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,   I lift my lamp beside the golden door! - Emma Lazarus Even as those words were engraved on a plaque within the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty in 1903, many Americans didn't believe in them. Consequently, more than a century later, it's no surprise to find neo-nativists who feel no sympathy for thousands of Central American children who found their way to this country by dubious means.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgar Trinidad Mendez no longer lives in fear. But that was not always the case for the Mexican undocumented immigrant, who came to the United States when he was 6. Mendez, 24, of Deptford, was a high school sophomore when he learned how his life and aspirations would take a different course because he was undocumented. "Since I [can] remember, I have been undocumented. My life has been consumed by uncertainty, always apprehensive about an unclear future," Mendez said. "Being undocumented is like having ball chains tied to the limbs of your body, preventing you to move forward.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
There's an easy way to describe House Republicans' continued reluctance to pass an immigration overhaul that provides a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people residing in this country illegally: selfish. Republican former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour didn't use that word during a recent Bipartisan Policy Center forum on immigration at the University of Pennsylvania, but he might as well have. Barbour noted that, unlike GOP presidential candidates running nationally, Republican House members seeking reelection in largely safe districts don't care about courting Hispanic voters by endorsing immigration reform.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hazleton, Pa., has lost another round in federal court as it tries to enforce ordinances that crack down on illegal immigrants. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit on Friday reaffirmed its ruling that the Northeastern Pennsylvania city's 2006 law is unconstitutional because it preempts the federal government's jurisdiction over immigration. The law would penalize landlords who rented to illegal immigrants, and employers who hired them. It was immediately challenged by Hispanic and other groups, and blocked in 2007 by a federal district court.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Broadly speaking, recent newcomers to Pennsylvania who were born abroad hail mainly from Asia and Central America, are younger than the native-born, and are more heavily concentrated at the high and low ends of the educational spectrum. So concludes an analysis released Wednesday by the nonprofit Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians, which examined where immigrants have settled in the Keystone State, which languages they speak at home, how many have become U.S. citizens, and other characteristics in five Southeastern Pennsylvania congressional districts.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
NOW THAT the Senate has passed a sweeping bipartisan bill to overhaul the nation's immigration laws, it's the House's turn to act. But, as expected, Republicans in that chamber are once again insisting that the border between the U.S. and Mexico be sealed as a prerequisite to approving broader reforms. Unless 90 percent of illegal border crossings are stopped once and for all, they say, they will not support any plan to grant legal status to the 11 million immigrants who are living in the country illegally.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By David Espo, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In the courts of law and public opinion, congressional Republicans increasingly accuse President Obama of exceeding his constitutional authority for the benefit of special interests, most recently by delaying a requirement for businesses to provide health care for their workers. In one instance, Senate Republicans formally backed a lawsuit challenging the president's appointment of three members of the National Labor Relations Board without confirmation. The Supreme Court has agreed to review a ruling in the case, which found that Obama overstepped his bounds.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Landmark immigration legislation passed by the Senate would remake America's workforce from the highest rungs to the lowest and bring many more immigrants into the economy, from elite technology companies to restaurant kitchens and rural fields. In place of the unauthorized workers now commonly found laboring in lower-skilled jobs in the agriculture or service industries, many of these workers would be legal, some of them permanent-resident green card holders or even citizens.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As the national debate on immigration reform moves to the House, Republican congressmen from the Philadelphia suburbs are again in the middle of a cultural tug-of-war. On the right, their more conservative GOP colleagues have vowed to oppose anything that sounds like "amnesty" for undocumented immigrants. On the left, labor, Hispanic, and faith-based groups are pushing local House Republicans to provide the key votes for the most controversial aspect of the Senate plan: a pathway to citizenship.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
The fight over immigration reform has the potential to become a pivotal moment in American political history. Make the wrong decision, and the Republican Party will join the Federalists and Whigs in oblivion. That may sound overly dramatic, but the GOP admits its positions on immigration cost it dearly in the 2012 presidential election. If it continues to act as if it doesn't need the country's fastest-growing demographic group - Latinos - it can kiss its future goodbye. The end may not be swift.
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