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Immigration Policy

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NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Charles Babington, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - There's not much President Obama can do to boost the economy in the next five months, and that alone might cost him the election. But on a range of social issues, Obama is bypassing Congress and aggressively using his executive powers to make it easier for gays to marry, women to obtain birth control, and, now, young illegal immigrants to avoid deportation. It's a gamble that might fire up conservatives, many of whom remain cool to Republican Mitt Romney. Democrats think it's more likely to inspire enthusiasm among groups that were crucial to Obama's 2008 victory - young voters, women, and Hispanics.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
An armed man strolls through a basketball game, opens fire on the bleachers, injuring six people, one critically. The shooter is still at large. Of the 500 people present at the game, not one has stepped forward with information that might help the police find the shooter. This week's incident, at the Kingsessing Recreation Center, is a discouraging chapter in the city. We are as upset as anyone - including Mayor Nutter, who offered a $20,000 reward for information (215-686-TIPS) - over the irony of violence occurring in a so-called "safe haven" rec center.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | By Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Attorney General John Ashcroft yesterday announced sweeping changes in immigration policy, including a new task force aimed at preventing terrorists from entering the United States and tracking them down if they do. He also asked that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell designate 46 groups as terrorist organizations whose members or supporters will be denied visas. "America will not allow terrorists to use our hospitality as a weapon against us," he said. The key objective of the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force, to be led by Steven C. McCraw, deputy assistant director of the FBI's Intelligence Branch, is to make sure that federal agencies - the FBI, Immigration and Naturalization Service, CIA, State Department and Customs Service - share vital information.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Rosalind S. Helderman and David Nakamura, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - A working group of senators from both parties is nearing agreement on broad principles for overhauling the nation's immigration laws, representing the most substantive bipartisan effort toward comprehensive legislation in years. The six members have met quietly since the November election, most recently on Wednesday. Congressional aides stressed there is not yet final agreement, but they have eyed Friday as a target date for a possible public announcement. The talks mark the most in-depth negotiations involving members of both parties since a similar effort broke down in 2010 without producing a bill.
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | By DAN STEIN
Amazingly, U.S. immigration policy now admits, legally and illegally, the equivalent of the population of San Francisco every six months without a clear idea of what it will mean to the country. As early as 1982, the National Academy of Sciences complained that the government was failing to collect much meaningful data about immigrants. The bureaucrats in Washington can tell us about how many immigrants are here and where they come from, but little about what sort of human capital they bring with them and the fiscal impact they have on the country after they arrive.
NEWS
November 3, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is no accident that one of Mitt Romney's favorite surrogates on the campaign trail is Marco Rubio, the Florida senator of Cuban ancestry, who rallied a crowd Thursday night in Delaware County. Rubio, energetic in a zippered black fleece, told 1,000 or so Republican supporters at the Heritage Ballroom in Ridley Township he was stumping in Pennsylvania now because the state, once deemed a lock for President Obama, is suddenly in play - or so said Rubio. "How does it feel to be a swing state?"
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The issues of welfare reform and immigration policy formed the meat and potatoes of this Sunday brunch. Three speakers made their cases at a Bread and Roses Community Fund meeting yesterday at a house in the city's Powelton Village section. They saw forthcoming changes in the welfare system and the tightening of U.S. immigration policy as "a general attack on poor people. " The Bread and Roses Community Fund, which disburses money to local groups seeking social change, held the discussion to "see how immigration policy and welfare reform impact on the poor" of Philadelphia, said Judy Claude, director of the group.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
By Jan C. Ting Our immigration system is not broken. We don't need, and Congress shouldn't enact, amnesty. Both my parents were immigrants. All Americans are either immigrants or descendants of ancestors who came from somewhere else, including Native Americans. We should all respect and admire immigrants. But that's not the question. The question is: How many? Specifically, should we enforce a numerical limit on immigration to the United States, or, alternatively, should we allow unlimited immigration, as we did for our first century?
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department yesterday sued Arizona over its tough new immigration law, charging the state with crossing a "constitutional line" that would undermine the federal government's efforts to monitor illegal aliens. In its lawsuit, filed in Phoenix, the Justice Department explained that the federal government has the strict and sole authority to create national immigration policy. "Arizona's immigration policy . . . exceeds a state's role with respect to aliens, interferes with the federal government's balanced administration of the immigration laws, and critically undermines U.S. foreign policy objectives," the department said.
NEWS
September 1, 2001 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush acknowledged yesterday that his effort to liberalize immigration policy was bogged down in political quicksand and said he did not expect any breakthroughs at next week's state visit here by Mexican President Vicente Fox. Officials from both countries had hoped to cap Fox's three-day visit with a far-reaching proposal designed to make it easier for Mexican workers to enter the United States legally. Instead, Bush and Fox will settle for a broad "statement of principles" that dodges the issue of what to do about illegal workers already here.
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NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a gathering called "Chant Down the Walls," members of Juntos, a social-justice group for Latino immigrants, gathered in the crisp morning air Friday outside the Immigration and Customs Enforcement field office. They shouted "Si se puede" - "Yes We Can" in Spanish - sang, and waved flags from Latin American countries, one day after President Obama announced he was taking executive action to change immigration policy. Many in the crowd sang along with musicians playing guitars and the wooden box drum called a cajon . Erika Almiron, executive director of Juntos, said the rally of about 60 people was in support of immigrants being detained in the ICE headquarters.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THEIR CHANTS filled the tiny taqueria , lifting high above the din of the blasting televisions that had just shown President Obama's address. "SI SE PUDO!" "We did it!" Dozens of illegal immigrants - some children, some with children of their own - packed into Taquitos de Puebla, on 9th Street near Ellsworth in South Philly, last night to hear President Obama announce his much-touted reforms to the nation's immigration policy. And few in that crowded room were as happy as Carlos Rojas.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | BY DAN K. THOMASSON
PRESIDENT Obama weeks ago attended July Fourth ceremonies for 25 members of the U.S. armed forces who were sworn in as newly minted American citizens. It was a quiet, dignified and impressive event that punctuated the importance of somehow solving what has become the nation's most pressing domestic problem: the lack of coherent immigration policy. More than that, it seemed an oasis of sanity in the political upheaval that is bound to be a major issue in the coming midterm elections and the crisis that deepens daily, aggravated by an onslaught of homeless children at our borders and the refusal of Congress to pass the fiscal wherewithal to deal with it before the coming August recess.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rusty fence bisects the virtual desert, so grab your cursor and pick a side. You are playing The Migrant Trail , an online game about the human toll of illegal immigration. You choose an avatar from a group of immigrants trying to sneak into the United States, or border agents trying to catch them. You pick a route, what to wear, what to carry, when to rest, when to search, and when to hide. Software dictates the consequences. Didn't bring enough water, or weighed yourself down with too much?
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Set aside any moral imperatives, political experts told an audience Thursday at the University of Pennsylvania: The strongest argument for immigration reform is financial. "America is in a global battle" for capital and labor "to grow our economy," said former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, a former head of the Republican National Committee. If we educate immigrants at our universities but don't make it possible for them to stay in America, he said, the businesses they start, often with hundreds of jobs, "end up in Mumbai" instead of Memphis.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A promised path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants in the United States illegally may leave out hundreds of thousands of them. Bipartisan Senate legislation would make legalization and ultimately citizenship available only to those who arrived in the United States before Dec. 31, 2011, according to a Senate aide with knowledge of the proposals. Anyone who came after that date would be subject to deportation. The bill, expected to be introduced next week, also would require applicants to document that they were in the country before the cutoff date, have a clean criminal record and show enough employment or financial stability that they're likely to stay off welfare, said the aide, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the proposals had not been made public.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
By Jan C. Ting Our immigration system is not broken. We don't need, and Congress shouldn't enact, amnesty. Both my parents were immigrants. All Americans are either immigrants or descendants of ancestors who came from somewhere else, including Native Americans. We should all respect and admire immigrants. But that's not the question. The question is: How many? Specifically, should we enforce a numerical limit on immigration to the United States, or, alternatively, should we allow unlimited immigration, as we did for our first century?
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Senators writing a comprehensive immigration bill may dramatically limit green cards for extended families of U.S. citizens, reserving them for immediate family members instead, a key lawmaker said Thursday. It would be a significant change to U.S. immigration policy that has long favored family ties over economic or job criteria. It is already sparking opposition from groups trying to protect family-based immigration. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.), part of a bipartisan Senate group negotiating the bill, said the aim was to remake the immigration system so it had a clearer economic focus.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
It's not hyperbole to say that immigration is among America's most important economic advantages. Nothing makes our economy tick more than the energy of those who move here from the rest of the world. Not all of us benefit from the million or so immigrants who come here every year, but most of us do. Much of the long-running debate over immigration policy stems from the worry that immigrants take jobs from Americans. Yet this is not so. Generally speaking, immigrants either come with few skills and little education or are highly skilled and well educated.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
By Paul H. Robinson A hacker is illegally downloading millions of files through computer equipment surreptitiously installed in a utility closet in the victim's basement. Previous attempts to stop the illegal downloading have been countered with a change in strategy by the persistent hacker. When the illicit equipment is finally discovered in the closet, police install a surveillance camera to catch the intruder. After a few misses, he is caught and charged. A law enforcement success?
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