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Immigration Policy

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NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Charles Babington, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - There's not much President Obama can do to boost the economy in the next five months, and that alone might cost him the election. But on a range of social issues, Obama is bypassing Congress and aggressively using his executive powers to make it easier for gays to marry, women to obtain birth control, and, now, young illegal immigrants to avoid deportation. It's a gamble that might fire up conservatives, many of whom remain cool to Republican Mitt Romney. Democrats think it's more likely to inspire enthusiasm among groups that were crucial to Obama's 2008 victory - young voters, women, and Hispanics.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
An armed man strolls through a basketball game, opens fire on the bleachers, injuring six people, one critically. The shooter is still at large. Of the 500 people present at the game, not one has stepped forward with information that might help the police find the shooter. This week's incident, at the Kingsessing Recreation Center, is a discouraging chapter in the city. We are as upset as anyone - including Mayor Nutter, who offered a $20,000 reward for information (215-686-TIPS) - over the irony of violence occurring in a so-called "safe haven" rec center.
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) attacked Democratic challenger Katie McGinty over Philadelphia's "sanctuary city" status Monday, pivoting to local issues after a week when most attention - including some of his own - focused on Donald Trump. In an op-ed piece in Sunday's Inquirer, Toomey said he was "inclined" to support the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, but raised concerns about Trump, whose divisiveness is casting a shadow over GOP politics and his own reelection bid. By Monday, however, Toomey had turned to a flash point in the immigration debate, criticizing so-called sanctuary cities that cut off or limit cooperation between local police and federal authorities on immigration matters.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | By Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Attorney General John Ashcroft yesterday announced sweeping changes in immigration policy, including a new task force aimed at preventing terrorists from entering the United States and tracking them down if they do. He also asked that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell designate 46 groups as terrorist organizations whose members or supporters will be denied visas. "America will not allow terrorists to use our hospitality as a weapon against us," he said. The key objective of the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force, to be led by Steven C. McCraw, deputy assistant director of the FBI's Intelligence Branch, is to make sure that federal agencies - the FBI, Immigration and Naturalization Service, CIA, State Department and Customs Service - share vital information.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Rosalind S. Helderman and David Nakamura, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - A working group of senators from both parties is nearing agreement on broad principles for overhauling the nation's immigration laws, representing the most substantive bipartisan effort toward comprehensive legislation in years. The six members have met quietly since the November election, most recently on Wednesday. Congressional aides stressed there is not yet final agreement, but they have eyed Friday as a target date for a possible public announcement. The talks mark the most in-depth negotiations involving members of both parties since a similar effort broke down in 2010 without producing a bill.
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | By DAN STEIN
Amazingly, U.S. immigration policy now admits, legally and illegally, the equivalent of the population of San Francisco every six months without a clear idea of what it will mean to the country. As early as 1982, the National Academy of Sciences complained that the government was failing to collect much meaningful data about immigrants. The bureaucrats in Washington can tell us about how many immigrants are here and where they come from, but little about what sort of human capital they bring with them and the fiscal impact they have on the country after they arrive.
NEWS
November 3, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is no accident that one of Mitt Romney's favorite surrogates on the campaign trail is Marco Rubio, the Florida senator of Cuban ancestry, who rallied a crowd Thursday night in Delaware County. Rubio, energetic in a zippered black fleece, told 1,000 or so Republican supporters at the Heritage Ballroom in Ridley Township he was stumping in Pennsylvania now because the state, once deemed a lock for President Obama, is suddenly in play - or so said Rubio. "How does it feel to be a swing state?"
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Michael Matza and Vibha Kannan, STAFF WRITERS
Urging Congress to overhaul the immigration system or risk losing in global workforce competition, Philadelphia business and community leaders rallied Wednesday on Independence Mall, releasing fresh state-by-state data on the economic impact of foreign-born newcomers and launching a campaign they call Reason for Reform. Rob Wonderling, president and CEO of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, called on elected officials to "enact policies and reforms that will support immigration as critical [to]
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The issues of welfare reform and immigration policy formed the meat and potatoes of this Sunday brunch. Three speakers made their cases at a Bread and Roses Community Fund meeting yesterday at a house in the city's Powelton Village section. They saw forthcoming changes in the welfare system and the tightening of U.S. immigration policy as "a general attack on poor people. " The Bread and Roses Community Fund, which disburses money to local groups seeking social change, held the discussion to "see how immigration policy and welfare reform impact on the poor" of Philadelphia, said Judy Claude, director of the group.
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department yesterday sued Arizona over its tough new immigration law, charging the state with crossing a "constitutional line" that would undermine the federal government's efforts to monitor illegal aliens. In its lawsuit, filed in Phoenix, the Justice Department explained that the federal government has the strict and sole authority to create national immigration policy. "Arizona's immigration policy . . . exceeds a state's role with respect to aliens, interferes with the federal government's balanced administration of the immigration laws, and critically undermines U.S. foreign policy objectives," the department said.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016
By John B. Quigley The recent spate of terrorist attacks in France and Germany has forced a rethinking of European immigration policy. But the violent events, however horrendous they've been, have done nothing to change the fact that millions have been displaced by broader violence, particularly in the Middle East, and are seeking refuge in the West. Until the wider circumstances change, European Union leaders will have a hard time stemming the flow of migrants crossing their borders.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Michael Matza and Vibha Kannan, STAFF WRITERS
Urging Congress to overhaul the immigration system or risk losing in global workforce competition, Philadelphia business and community leaders rallied Wednesday on Independence Mall, releasing fresh state-by-state data on the economic impact of foreign-born newcomers and launching a campaign they call Reason for Reform. Rob Wonderling, president and CEO of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, called on elected officials to "enact policies and reforms that will support immigration as critical [to]
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) attacked Democratic challenger Katie McGinty over Philadelphia's "sanctuary city" status Monday, pivoting to local issues after a week when most attention - including some of his own - focused on Donald Trump. In an op-ed piece in Sunday's Inquirer, Toomey said he was "inclined" to support the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, but raised concerns about Trump, whose divisiveness is casting a shadow over GOP politics and his own reelection bid. By Monday, however, Toomey had turned to a flash point in the immigration debate, criticizing so-called sanctuary cities that cut off or limit cooperation between local police and federal authorities on immigration matters.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - With thousands of demonstrators rallying outside, a divided U.S. Supreme Court listened Monday as advocates argued over whether President Obama overstepped his authority when he issued orders to let millions of undocumented immigrants stay in the country. For 90 minutes, the justices pressed the lawyers and considered whether the administration policy amounts to simply "tolerating" the surge of immigrants, or grants them benefits they deserve because of their "legal presence" in the country.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
STU BYKOFSKY's points in his column against immigrants seem to be coming from a visceral place of fear rather than research about immigrants in U.S. society. He and other anti-immigrant advocates, focus on the tragic murder of a woman in San Francisco by a man who was in this country without documents, while neglecting to discuss research about immigration and crime. The individual event is much more sensational than evidence from scientific studies. In fact, neighborhoods with a high share of immigrants are safer than other neighborhoods at similar income levels.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
By Don Kusler Fear is among our strongest motivators and is, at its core, a survival instinct millions of years in the making. And while fear can indeed provide an awareness essential to survival, it can also be reactionary and crippling. Consequently, fear-mongering is common in political communication. Just take stock in the rhetoric coming out of the numerous debates and campaign advertisements related to the upcoming presidential election. One of the most disturbing uses of fear is playing out as candidates and elected officials prey on the reactionary fears that many Americans have about immigrants, particularly immigrants in the country illegally.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a gathering called "Chant Down the Walls," members of Juntos, a social-justice group for Latino immigrants, gathered in the crisp morning air Friday outside the Immigration and Customs Enforcement field office. They shouted "Si se puede" - "Yes We Can" in Spanish - sang, and waved flags from Latin American countries, one day after President Obama announced he was taking executive action to change immigration policy. Many in the crowd sang along with musicians playing guitars and the wooden box drum called a cajon . Erika Almiron, executive director of Juntos, said the rally of about 60 people was in support of immigrants being detained in the ICE headquarters.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THEIR CHANTS filled the tiny taqueria , lifting high above the din of the blasting televisions that had just shown President Obama's address. "SI SE PUDO!" "We did it!" Dozens of illegal immigrants - some children, some with children of their own - packed into Taquitos de Puebla, on 9th Street near Ellsworth in South Philly, last night to hear President Obama announce his much-touted reforms to the nation's immigration policy. And few in that crowded room were as happy as Carlos Rojas.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | BY DAN K. THOMASSON
PRESIDENT Obama weeks ago attended July Fourth ceremonies for 25 members of the U.S. armed forces who were sworn in as newly minted American citizens. It was a quiet, dignified and impressive event that punctuated the importance of somehow solving what has become the nation's most pressing domestic problem: the lack of coherent immigration policy. More than that, it seemed an oasis of sanity in the political upheaval that is bound to be a major issue in the coming midterm elections and the crisis that deepens daily, aggravated by an onslaught of homeless children at our borders and the refusal of Congress to pass the fiscal wherewithal to deal with it before the coming August recess.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rusty fence bisects the virtual desert, so grab your cursor and pick a side. You are playing The Migrant Trail , an online game about the human toll of illegal immigration. You choose an avatar from a group of immigrants trying to sneak into the United States, or border agents trying to catch them. You pick a route, what to wear, what to carry, when to rest, when to search, and when to hide. Software dictates the consequences. Didn't bring enough water, or weighed yourself down with too much?
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