CollectionsImmigration Reform
IN THE NEWS

Immigration Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 30, 2006 | By Steve Britt
It's 2006 and time for the decennial immigration reform. As in 1986 and 1996, Congress is again pondering comprehensive amendments to the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act. The most recent proposal is Sen. Arlen Specter's compendium of other bills that promises increased enforcement while granting legalization to perhaps 9 million illegal aliens already here. If a new immigration law is enacted this year, it probably will resemble Specter's bill. The Specter bill would have a profound effect on immigration policy for a while but will do nothing to solve the immigration issue.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
FAMILY vacations are usually a nice getaway from home, but for one 13-year-old, her destination became her home. "I thought we were going to Disney World for vacation," said Maria Marroquin, an undocumented resident who spoke yesterday at an immigration-reform rally in Center City. "I had no idea we were going to stay here. " Marroquin left Peru with her family 10 years ago, and they overstayed their visitors' visas, eventually settling in Glenside. Now 23, Marroquin has graduated from Montgomery County Community College - a feat that took four years instead of two because she had to pay tuition out of pocket at the pricier international-student rate.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
Charles Allison Jr. is CEO of CWBiofuels in New York and a member of the Partnership for a New American Economy The level of uncertainty and despair stemming from Washington makes it hard to be optimistic about our nation's future. Three years into the recession, jobs have still not come back, and to many, the future still looks bleak. But Congress can change that outlook. It can put America back on the road to job creation. And the necessary steps do not require large capital investment, new spending, or higher taxes.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
Republicans in Congress must now decide whether this nation is going to live up to its time-honored reputation as a welcoming beacon to immigrants. They can either follow a sensible path to immigration reform, along the lines their leader outlined in Monday night's presidential address, or they can stubbornly cling to a xenophobic course that will make matters worse. Members of the party known for its infamous "Southern strategy," which exploited racial divisions to cultivate votes, now can make inclusiveness more than just a slogan.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
ARIZONA'S recent passage of a new immigration law demonstrates the urgent need for federal comprehensive immigration reform. The controversial law attempts to address some of the very real challenges Arizona faces. But its specific provisions - which include allowing police to stop people for no other reason than that they look like they may not have been born in the United States - go too far. The law does not reflect the American values that I know and cherish. In fact, in December, I signed an executive order that prohibits city workers from asking anyone their immigration status - this includes police officers, unless asking such questions is relevant to a criminal investigation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Frustrated by federal inaction on immigration reform, Mayor Kenney plans to put one of his administration's hallmark concerns under the Democratic National Convention spotlight next week: how to create "inclusive and welcoming communities" for immigrants and refugees without Washington's help. Condemning Congress as "so inanely incompetent" at overhauling immigration laws, Kenney on Tuesday said he would host a forum on what cities can do to recognize opportunity in demographic change.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Don't be fooled by his preppy bow tie and conservative suit. Philadelphia lawyer William Stock leads a national army of 14,000 attorneys bent on revolution. On shutting down the family detention centers that hold children arrested with immigrant parents. On eliminating the one-year deadline to apply for asylum. On getting the government to pay for a lawyer for anyone facing deportation. Last month, Stock, 48, became president of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, now in its 70th year.
NEWS
June 28, 2016
ISSUE | IMMIGRATION A political mess The Supreme Court, in a 4-4 vote, has allowed to stand a lower-court ruling that voids President Obama's executive order on immigration (" Supreme Court defeat for Obama ," Friday). Instead of shielding millions of illegal immigrants from deportation and making then eligible for work permits, the ruling ensures that the immigration situation remains in turmoil and limbo. Never has the hubris of the Republican Party's obstructionist agenda to block Obama's governance been more transparent.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Katherine gets nervous thinking about the imminent decision of the Supreme Court in United States v. Texas . The case will determine the fate of President Obama's executive actions regarding immigration - and Katherine's legal status. In the absence of a replacement for Justice Antonin Scalia, the case could easily divide the court's liberals and conservatives, 4-4, jeopardizing Katherine and four million others in their own, unique immigration entanglements. Katherine was born in the Philippines in 1979.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
When the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in the nation's most closely watched immigration lawsuit, Libia Rodriguez will be among the expected thousands of demonstrators at the court's white marble steps. The case, United States v. Texas , could be a life-changer for Rodriguez, 31, an undocumented Mexican immigrant who lives in Coatesville with her husband, also here illegally, and their three U.S.-born children. Depending on the justices' ruling, the couple could put aside their worries of being sent back to Mexico.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THERE WAS no parking anywhere near East Palmer Street in Fishtown on a recent Sunday afternoon. No easy way to cut through the crowd at Interstate Drafthouse, either. The bar was packed with people hyped to meet Braddock, Pa., Mayor John Fetterman, the tattooed, biker-looking U.S. Senate candidate who's made a big splash as much for his size as his politics. I like his politics, but I wasn't there for the big guy. I was there for the woman who's been by his side on this crazy ride that's attracted national attention, even if he is a distant third in the polls.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
I RARELY WRITE about immigration, partly because I spend enough time practicing immigration law, and partly because my words are taken with a grain of salt the size of that dinosaur-killing meteor. My conservative friends raise their eyebrows in that "We love her, but gosh darn, she should get her head checked" kind of way whenever I champion any form of legalization, while the liberals just flare their nostrils and say "Yeah, the chick is only interested in getting rich off of the poor illegals.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cristina Martinez arrives at work at 4 a.m., ties a white apron high across her chest, and starts preparing a lamb cooked in vapor for 10 hours. An hour later, she and her husband, Ben Miller, open their South Philadelphia restaurant, Barbacoa, serving premium tacos - and hefty sides of activism - in their bid to mobilize restaurateurs on behalf of the many undocumented immigrants who work in America's kitchens. Hosting organizational meetings and screening documentaries, the couple hope to spark a culinary crusade in a city famous for its restaurant scene - and pressure the deadlocked Congress to overhaul the immigration laws.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
YORK, Pa. - Alma Lopez stood outside the county prison here, where undocumented immigrants are jailed pending deportation, and broke into tears. All around her, scores of activists unfurled banners emblazoned with inspirational messages, snapped keepsake photos with their smartphones, prayed, and sang in Spanish and English to support the 100 women who set off Tuesday on a 100-mile march to Washington. The weeklong trek, which organizers are calling a pilgrimage, is designed to humanize the increasingly demonized national debate about immigration.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|