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Immune System

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NEWS
November 22, 1987 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
A radical new therapy that destroys a person's immune system, then "rescues" it with a bone-marrow transplant, is saving the lives of dozens of cancer patients who would otherwise be condemned to death. The "kill and rescue" therapy being used at Hahnemann University Hospital is so effective - yet so potentially life-threatening - that the hospital is building a $2.5 million bone-marrow transplant center, which will be sealed airtight and sterilized against the common germs and microbes of the world outside.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Lancaster County heart-transplant recipient has become the first of 15 patients to receive a revolutionary therapy designed to prevent his body from rejecting the organ. The technique involved replacing part of his immune system with that of his donor. The technique is controversial and as yet unproven. David Combs, 53, of Kirkwood, is doing well after the heart transplant on Sunday, said his doctors at Allegheny University Hospitals/Hahnemann. Combs, a longtime coronary artery disease patient, received the immune-system transplant yesterday.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
Uncovering a new connection between body and mind, a Canadian study has shown that just looking at pictures of sick people can rev up the human immune system. The researchers, from the University of British Columbia, treated a group of volunteers to a 10-minute slide show of sniffling, congested, pox-riddled people or close-ups of infected sores. Then they measured an immune protein called interleukin-6 in their blood, a standard test that can approximate immune response. They published their results in last week's issue of the journal Psychological Science.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the hot topics in cancer medicine is using tiny particles to deliver drugs directly to a tumor, rather than bombarding the whole body with chemotherapy. But the immune system treats these nanoparticles as foreign invaders, so it tries to clear them before they do their job. The solution, says a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers, is to make the foreign particles seem like natives. The group reported Thursday they had done just that in lab mice, attaching customized protein fragments to the particles that tricked the animals' immune-system "border guards" into relaxing their vigilance.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eastman Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Eastman Kodak Co., has paid Immunex Corp. of Seattle slightly more than $3 million for rights to market a genetically engineered protein, interleukin-4 (IL-4). Interleukins are members of a class of naturally occurring proteins, the lymphokines, which play a vital role in the regulation of the body's immune system. Immunologists consider lymphokines to be chemical messengers that signal various components of the immune system to spring into action when foreign matter invades the body.
NEWS
October 13, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Susumu Tonegawa learned that he had won the Nobel prize for medicine yesterday morning when a Japanese reporter called him about 6:30 a.m. at his home in Newton, Mass. Tonegawa was "very surprised" and a bit skeptical because he had not heard formally from the Nobel Institute in Stockholm. He thought "this could be all made up by the media," he told reporters later yesterday, after he knew that he had indeed won the prize. Tonegawa, a biologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, was upstaged at his news conference by his 9-month-old son, Hidde, his only child, who laughed, yelled and mugged for the television cameras.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the hot trends in cancer medicine is using tiny particles to deliver drugs directly to a tumor, rather than bombarding the whole body with chemotherapy. But the immune system treats these nanoparticles as foreign invaders, so it tries to clear them before they can do their job. The solution, says a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers, is to make the foreign particles seem like natives. The group reported Thursday it had done just that in lab mice, attaching customized protein fragments to the particles that tricked the animals' immune-system "border guards" into relaxing their vigilance.
NEWS
March 24, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An intruder is inside your body. Maybe it's a parasite from dirty drinking water. A virus from a coworker's sneeze. Or a bacterium that sneaked in when you cut your finger. Luckily for you, the immune system determines just which one of its many weapons will best repel the intruder, and what's more, it "remembers" how to do the job even better, and faster, next time. This phenomenon of immune memory has been recognized since at least the time of the ancient Greeks, yet no one could figure out how it worked.
NEWS
March 27, 1995 | By Rebecca Goldsmith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Willingboro doctor known for his work on disease prevention and minority health is launching a program aimed at bolstering the immune systems of HIV patients through holistic health measures. Vernon R. Daly is a former vascular surgeon from Brooklyn who founded the Heureka Center for Disease Prevention & Health Promotion in 1991 after he moved to South Jersey. Inspired by his belief that minorities are underserved by the medical community, Daly's Heureka center has sought to reach out, sponsoring minority health fairs.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania researchers have earned acclaim in recent years for using a type of genetic engineering to treat leukemia. Now another Penn team says the tactic may be effective against a debilitating skin disease. That is because the two maladies have something in common: deviant cells of the immune system. The treatment for the skin disease, a rare autoimmune disorder called pemphigus vulgaris, has been demonstrated so far only in mice, the scientists reported online Thursday in the journal Science.
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NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
In the biggest effort yet to find a cure for HIV, the National Institutes of Health on Wednesday named six large scientific teams, one led by Philadelphia's Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania, to tackle different parts of the challenge. The government will commit $30 million a year for five years to the project. The Philadelphia collaboration will get $4.6 million a year. For years, with the world focused on getting treatment to millions of infected people and preventing further spread of the disease, the notion of a "cure seemed naive and overambitious," said Luis J. Montaner, the director of an HIV laboratory at Wistar, who will share leadership of the Philadelphia team.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
Joe Tarrant's family had plenty of reasons to worry about him. Complications during his birth left him developmentally disabled. By the time he was 5, doctors discovered that only one of his kidneys was fully functional. Decades of wear on his healthy kidney ultimately destroyed that organ. By age 40, he required a kidney transplant. Still, Joe led a full life, including lots of outdoor activities. "His kidney was fine. His heart was fine," big brother Patrick Tarrant, who lives in Newtown, recalled recently.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania researchers have earned acclaim in recent years for using a type of genetic engineering to treat leukemia. Now another Penn team says the tactic may be effective against a debilitating skin disease. That is because the two maladies have something in common: deviant cells of the immune system. The treatment for the skin disease, a rare autoimmune disorder called pemphigus vulgaris, has been demonstrated so far only in mice, the scientists reported online Thursday in the journal Science.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I have been seeing this guy for a couple of months now. He started very fast, being very involved with me, but a few weeks later, he took a step back and said that he liked being around me, but that when he realized he was getting real feelings for me, he was scared. Now he doesn't text or ask me out every day, but we hang out once a week and call it "casual dating. " Although I like the casualness of it and not having to report to someone every moment of my day, I also don't want us to just "hook up. " It feels cheap.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Formula Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Berwyn, and Rockland Immunochemicals Inc., in Limerick, announced a collaboration Monday to develop cancer immunotherapies, focusing on Formula's Cytokine Induced Killer (C.I.K.) cell-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technology to treat cancer. Financial terms were not disclosed. Rockland will provide the research staff and a 60,000-square-foot research and development facility to develop and increase Formula's product pipeline, Formula president and CEO Maurits W. Geerlings said.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
How close are we to THE ULTIMATE healing factor? As "Deadpool" explodes across the big screen this weekend, the antihero with extraordinary healing powers-that save him from everything from cancer to bullets - is not THAT far-fetched, according to renowned physician, and North Philadelphia native, Dr. Ronald Klatz . The author of 42 books including the bestseller Grow Young With HGH , Klatz is a bioscientist with a portfolio of dozens...
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Vice President Biden met with scientists at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center Friday afternoon, officially launching his "moonshot" quest to cure cancer. "We're on the cusp of phenomenal breakthroughs," Biden said, adding that President Obama would be issuing an executive order that would get every federal agency involved in the effort. Biden asked the researchers to educate him on the challenges and possibilities of genome-based discoveries of the last several years, particularly a type of immunotherapy that has been pioneered by Penn researcher Carl H. June.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to a still-mysterious condition known as Castleman disease, David Fajgenbaum, a professor of hematology/oncology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, is more than an advocate or a physician/scientist: He is also a patient. Addressing a team of volunteers for the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), Fajgenbaum quickly details on a white board what is known about CD, a group of poorly understood inflammatory disorders that can vary from a single enlarged lymph node to life-threatening multiple organ failure.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Joan Capuzzi, For The Inquirer
Horses pull carts, jump hurdles, and carry everyone from jockeys to preteen girls. They are pretty good on their feet. So when a horse falls for no apparent reason, people notice. That's what happened three years ago to Ranger, a retired Thoroughbred racehorse living at Manor College's Jenkintown campus. "The students kept telling me that he would fall asleep suddenly and almost fall down before catching himself," said veterinarian Amy Bentz, an adjunct professor who teaches large-animal courses in Manor's Veterinary Technology Program.
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