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Immune System

NEWS
August 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RESEARCHERS have identified a mysterious new disease that has left scores of people in Asia and some in the United States with AIDS-like symptoms even though they are not infected with HIV. The patients' immune systems become damaged, leaving them unable to fend off germs, as healthy people do. What triggers this isn't known, but the disease does not seem to be contagious. This is another kind of acquired immune deficiency that is not inherited and occurs in adults, but doesn't spread the way AIDS does through a virus, said Dr. Sarah Browne, a scientist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
January 1, 2012
Robert Ader, 79, an experimental psychologist who was among the first scientists to show how mental processes influence the body's immune system, a finding that changed modern medicine, died Dec. 20 in Pittsford, N.Y. His death followed a long illness and complications of a fracture suffered in a fall, his daughter Deborah Ader said. Dr. Ader, who spent his entire career as a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, conducted some of the original experiments in a field he named himself, psychoneuroimmunology.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKHOLM - A pioneering researcher was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine yesterday, three days after dying of pancreatic cancer without ever knowing he was about to be honored for his immune-system work that he had used to prolong his own life. The Nobel committee said it was unaware that Canadian-born cell biologist Ralph Steinman had died when it awarded the prize to him, American Bruce Beutler and French scientist Jules Hoffmann. Since the committee is supposed to consider only living scientists, the Nobel Foundation held an emergency meeting yesterday and said the decision on the 10 million kronor ($1.5 million)
NEWS
October 22, 2012
In a sign of how far the science of cancer genomics has come, the University of Pennsylvania Health System will do genetic tests later this year on cancer cells of all patients with several types of cancer. Penn will test up to 48 genes in patients with melanoma, acute myelogenous leukemia, and brain and lung cancer, said Chi V. Dang, director of the Abramson Cancer Center. The results will reveal which patients could benefit from new drugs that work only for those with certain mutations.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1990 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
Major new clinical trials have been approved for a controversial drug that proponents say may prolong indefinitely the lives of patients infected with HIV, the virus that leads to AIDS, Food and Drug Administration officials said yesterday. The trials for Ampligen, an anti-viral compound, will begin next month and involve a total of 135 patients in as many as eight cities, including Philadelphia, according to officials of HEM Research Inc., the Center City firm whose chief scientist, William A. Carter, is a co-inventor of the drug.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two pints of bone marrow from a California donor whose tissue is genetically similar to that of a Bucks County leukemia victim at Hahnemann University Hospital were flown here and given to the woman last night in a last-resort attempt to cure her disease. The patient, Deborah Kelly of Levittown, beat 20,000-1 odds when her doctors located an unidentified donor in San Francisco whose bone marrow is genetically similar, according to physicians. That genetic similarity is so statistically rare that it has never happened in the 13-year history of bone-marrow transplantation therapy in this area, Hahnemann doctors said.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Deaths from acquired immune deficiency syndrome have passed the 20,000 mark in the United States, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported yesterday. It said that by last Monday, the number of deaths from AIDS had reached 20,342. More than 38,000 people in the United States have been diagnosed as having the disease. So far, almost three-quarters of the victims have been homosexual or bisexual men, including some who also were intravenous drug users. One in six has been an intravenous drug user who was not homosexual.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frogs with three legs - natural phenomenon or the result of pollution? Both forces may be at work, according to a study published yesterday by researchers at Pennsylvania State University. It is a debate that has raged for more than a decade, ever since schoolchildren and naturalists began finding what seemed to be increased numbers of frogs with grotesque deformities. Both environmental groups and conservative think-tanks have entered the fray - the former blaming pesticides and other human influence, the latter warning against a sky-is-falling mentality, noting that deformed frogs have been found since the 1700s.
SPORTS
December 24, 1997 | By Bill Iezzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hatboro-Horsham's John Kenny is not only one of the best distance swimmers in the area, he is also one of the most determined, competitive and courageous. Last year, the youngster stepped out of a sickbed to swim the 500-yard freestyle at Penn during the PIAA District 1 Class AAA championships. Seeded first in the event, the weakened junior finished sixth in 4 minutes, 47 seconds and barely qualified for the state meet, which was his goal. Many swimmers perform while sick, but not with a 105-degree fever and a weight loss of between 10 and 12 pounds, as Kenny did. For a week before the district meet on March 1, he lay in bed as a result of the Epstein-Barr virus, which causes infectious mononucleosis.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
EMOTIONS AND CHOLESTEROL Men, repressing negative emotions may give you high cholesterol. That's according to a report in Psychology Today on a study that found that "truly low anxious" men, who are honest with themselves and others about experiencing anxiety, had fairly low total cholesterol levels. But those who tend to "put on a happy face but have trouble acknowledging their negative emotions" averaged a whopping 40 points higher. HEARING AID For those who suffer from nerve, or inner ear, deafness, a high-price, high-tech hearing device is about to come on the market.
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