CollectionsImmune System
IN THE NEWS

Immune System

NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Ralph Steinman, a pioneer in understanding how cells fight disease, tried to help his own immune system thwart his pancreatic cancer. Steinman survived until Friday. Three days later, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine. The Nobel committee, unaware of his death, announced the award Monday in Stockholm. Steinman's employer, Rockefeller University in New York, learned of his death after the Nobel announcement. Steinman's wife, Claudia, said the family had planned to disclose his death Monday - only to discover an e-mail to his cellphone from the Nobel committee.
LIVING
June 20, 1994 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andy James' right forearm bulges as he lifts and carries the ladder at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, his T-shirt and jeans are soaked with sweat, and his skin, polished to a shine, shows off the muscle definition. But when confronted by leaves lying on the ground, he shrinks. He asks Eddie Williams, twice his age and no glistening forearm muscles, to take command and lead the charge. "He's one of the people that just don't get it," said James, 31, shaking his head at Williams' immunity.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An existing drug dramatically reduced the most serious complications of bone marrow transplants, University of Pennsylvania researchers are reporting Thursday. The finding could someday point the way toward an entirely new method of preventing the body from "rejecting" transplanted organs of all kinds in the future, experts said. The work demonstrates a possible new approach to transplants of donated bone marrow, said Joseph Antin, a professor of medicine at Harvard, who was not involved with the study.
NEWS
June 23, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
BABY WALKERS. Parents, putting your tots in baby walkers may retard rather than aid their walking. "Recent studies have shown that walker use does not teach babies to walk earlier," the California Medical Association reports. "In fact, there is increasing evidence that the use of walkers delays or changes the way in which a baby learns to walk. " Since 1980, walkers have been involved in nearly 24,000 injuries serious enough to require treatment. Most accidents take place around stairways and stoves, leading the doctors to warn that babies in walkers should never be left alone.
NEWS
December 31, 2011
Robert Ader, 79, an experimental psychologist who was among the first scientists to show how mental processes influence the body's immune system, a finding that changed modern medicine, died Dec. 20 in Pittsford, N.Y. His death followed a long illness and complications of a fracture suffered in a fall, his daughter Deborah Ader said. Dr. Ader, who spent his entire career as a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, conducted some of the original experiments in a field he named himself, psychoneuroimmunology.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
In a sign of how far the science of cancer genomics has come, the University of Pennsylvania Health System will do genetic tests later this year on cancer cells of all patients with several types of cancer. Penn will test up to 48 genes in patients with melanoma, acute myelogenous leukemia, and brain and lung cancer, said Chi V. Dang, director of the Abramson Cancer Center. The results will reveal which patients could benefit from new drugs that work only for those with certain mutations.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RESEARCHERS have identified a mysterious new disease that has left scores of people in Asia and some in the United States with AIDS-like symptoms even though they are not infected with HIV. The patients' immune systems become damaged, leaving them unable to fend off germs, as healthy people do. What triggers this isn't known, but the disease does not seem to be contagious. This is another kind of acquired immune deficiency that is not inherited and occurs in adults, but doesn't spread the way AIDS does through a virus, said Dr. Sarah Browne, a scientist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1990 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
Major new clinical trials have been approved for a controversial drug that proponents say may prolong indefinitely the lives of patients infected with HIV, the virus that leads to AIDS, Food and Drug Administration officials said yesterday. The trials for Ampligen, an anti-viral compound, will begin next month and involve a total of 135 patients in as many as eight cities, including Philadelphia, according to officials of HEM Research Inc., the Center City firm whose chief scientist, William A. Carter, is a co-inventor of the drug.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|