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Immune System

SPORTS
December 15, 2011 | BY MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
IT WAS the day she had longed to see, one that for years seemed likely to elude her as she battled cystic fibrosis. But Ashley Owens had just received a double-lung transplant, in November 2009. The organs had been donated by a young boxer, Francisco "Paco" Rodriquez, who had died of head injuries at the Blue Horizon. The operation gave her the ability to breathe again without obstruction and enabled her last June 25 to walk down the aisle and exchange vows with Jesse Quinter at Blue Falls Grove in Reading.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Ralph Steinman, a pioneer in understanding how cells fight disease, tried to help his own immune system thwart his pancreatic cancer. Steinman survived until Friday. Three days later, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine. The Nobel committee, unaware of his death, announced the award Monday in Stockholm. Steinman's employer, Rockefeller University in New York, learned of his death after the Nobel announcement. Steinman's wife, Claudia, said the family had planned to disclose his death Monday - only to discover an e-mail to his cellphone from the Nobel committee.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
With his blood cancer progressing and standard chemotherapies no longer working, the patient decided to try an experimental gene therapy at the University of Pennsylvania. Twenty-two days after getting a very low dose, he had to be hospitalized because of toxic effects on his kidneys and liver - a problem the researchers had anticipated but considered unlikely. And then, the very next day, something happened that the researchers had not anticipated, despite 20 years of refining the treatment.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With his blood cancer progressing and standard chemotherapies no longer working, the patient decided to try an experimental gene therapy at the University of Pennsylvania. Twenty-two days after getting a very low dose, he had to be hospitalized because of toxic effects on his kidneys and liver - a problem the researchers had anticipated but considered unlikely. And then, the very next day, something happened that the researchers had not anticipated, despite 20 years of refining the gene therapy.
TRAVEL
June 5, 2011 | By Rosalind Bentley, ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
ATLANTA - I'm not getting sick. I'm not getting sick. I'm about to go on vacation, and I'm not getting sick. That's what you're telling yourself because you bought the tickets months ago, you've worked a lot of overtime, and you deserve some R&R. So you've decided to ignore that slight sniffle, hovering headache, and raw throat. No matter how congested you are, you're going to board that plane and try not to sneeze on the lady next to you in the aisle seat. The last thing anybody wants to do is spend his or her scheduled time off being ill - especially these days, when many employers lump vacation and sick time into one pot, and unexpected stomach flu can swallow time saved for a getaway.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disease is new and, so far, incurable. It is increasingly common and can occur at any age. It typically involves an allergic reaction to foods - in severe cases, all foods - and can turn the pleasurable act of eating into a torment of swallowing problems, pain, vomiting, and choking. If this is the first time you've heard of eosinophilic esophagitis (ee-oh-sin-oh-FILL-ic es-offa-JI-tis), it won't be the last. Add "EoE" to the growing list of ways in which the immune system can go horribly haywire for no apparent reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2011
"A merry heart doeth good like a medicine. " - Proverbs 17:22 DO THE SLUMPING economy, skyrocketing gas prices and record unemployment have you saying things like, "Hey, pinch me, wake me up, or at least tell me this is all some sick April Fool's joke, huh?" We're all facing so many challenges these days, but one of the best ways to cope and even improve our health and well-being doesn't cost a thing. Just laugh. Skeptical, are you? Well, in recent years plenty of scientific evidence has confirmed that laugher decreases stress, reduces pain and strengthens your immune system, among other wonders.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard G. Carroll, 52, of Wallingford, a cancer researcher at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died Friday, Sept. 24, of complications from pancreatic cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In 1999, Dr. Carroll joined the medical school's department of molecular and cellular engineering. He later shifted to the department of pathology and laboratory medicine. He was principal investigator at Penn for several grants from the National Institutes of Health to explore ways to condition the immune system to fight cancer.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
Uncovering a new connection between body and mind, a Canadian study has shown that just looking at pictures of sick people can rev up the human immune system. The researchers, from the University of British Columbia, treated a group of volunteers to a 10-minute slide show of sniffling, congested, pox-riddled people or close-ups of infected sores. Then they measured an immune protein called interleukin-6 in their blood, a standard test that can approximate immune response. They published their results in last week's issue of the journal Psychological Science.
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