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Immune System

NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disease is new and, so far, incurable. It is increasingly common and can occur at any age. It typically involves an allergic reaction to foods - in severe cases, all foods - and can turn the pleasurable act of eating into a torment of swallowing problems, pain, vomiting, and choking. If this is the first time you've heard of eosinophilic esophagitis (ee-oh-sin-oh-FILL-ic es-offa-JI-tis), it won't be the last. Add "EoE" to the growing list of ways in which the immune system can go horribly haywire for no apparent reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2011
"A merry heart doeth good like a medicine. " - Proverbs 17:22 DO THE SLUMPING economy, skyrocketing gas prices and record unemployment have you saying things like, "Hey, pinch me, wake me up, or at least tell me this is all some sick April Fool's joke, huh?" We're all facing so many challenges these days, but one of the best ways to cope and even improve our health and well-being doesn't cost a thing. Just laugh. Skeptical, are you? Well, in recent years plenty of scientific evidence has confirmed that laugher decreases stress, reduces pain and strengthens your immune system, among other wonders.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard G. Carroll, 52, of Wallingford, a cancer researcher at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died Friday, Sept. 24, of complications from pancreatic cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In 1999, Dr. Carroll joined the medical school's department of molecular and cellular engineering. He later shifted to the department of pathology and laboratory medicine. He was principal investigator at Penn for several grants from the National Institutes of Health to explore ways to condition the immune system to fight cancer.
NEWS
May 10, 2010
Uncovering a new connection between body and mind, a Canadian study has shown that just looking at pictures of sick people can rev up the human immune system. The researchers, from the University of British Columbia, treated a group of volunteers to a 10-minute slide show of sniffling, congested, pox-riddled people or close-ups of infected sores. Then they measured an immune protein called interleukin-6 in their blood, a standard test that can approximate immune response. They published their results in last week's issue of the journal Psychological Science.
NEWS
January 20, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Smiles and electric glances volleyed back and forth between conductor Christoph Eschenbach and pianist Meng-Chieh Liu as intricate chunks of the Barber Piano Concerto fell easily into place. That first rehearsal with the Curtis Symphony Orchestra Friday should have been tedious. And Liu should be jittery about his first Philadelphia concerto appearance, tonight at the Kimmel Center, since 1994. Instead, the situation is particularly sweet, considering that any concerto would have been out of the question a decade ago, when his hands were all but useless.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2008 | By EMILY GUENDELSBERGER guendee@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
VANILLA ICE (real name Robert Van Winkle, and how great is that?) was out on his own recognizance early yesterday afternoon after spending the night in jail for allegedly shoving his wife. The one-hit wonder ("Ice Ice Baby") was arrested Thursday night at his home in Wellington, Fla., by police who responded to a domestic-dispute call. According to an arrest report, Laura Van Winkle told a sheriff deputy at the scene that her husband had only pushed her, although she had told a dispatcher she'd been "struck" and "kicked.
NEWS
March 24, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An intruder is inside your body. Maybe it's a parasite from dirty drinking water. A virus from a coworker's sneeze. Or a bacterium that sneaked in when you cut your finger. Luckily for you, the immune system determines just which one of its many weapons will best repel the intruder, and what's more, it "remembers" how to do the job even better, and faster, next time. This phenomenon of immune memory has been recognized since at least the time of the ancient Greeks, yet no one could figure out how it worked.
NEWS
October 6, 2007
OK. It didn't work. But don't stop now. In fact, let's work twice as hard. Those are the take-away lessons from the Sept. 21 announcement that a prototype AIDS vaccine being tested by Merck had failed in the second of three phases of testing needed for market approval. Merck did the right thing: It stopped the trials as soon as its scientists saw people weren't benefitting. But it's a major blow to hopes that Merck had a hot lead, and to hopes for a workable AIDS vaccine in the foreseeable future.
NEWS
February 13, 2007
CELL PHONES are a convenience in today's society. They can summon help for a stranded motorist and connect people in airports and trains. A child can reach a parent on his commute home. But cell phones depend on electromagnetic radiation. How safe are they? Are consumers being informed? Various European countries have conducted studies of longtime users of cell phones and found an increased incidence of brain or acoustic tumors. Other studies cite disturbances in the body's energy systems.
NEWS
March 15, 2006 | By ROTAN LEE
MY JAN. 11 column, "Touched by an Angel," chronicled my recent stay at Lankenau Hospital and extolled the diagnostic brilliance of Dr. Judy Robinson, my personal physician. My cardiac condition came as a shock, yet it should have been a very preventable malady, caused mostly by my foolish belief in my invincibility. Like most men, I've long suffered hardheadedness. Getting regular medical overhauls, outside of those badge-of-honor injuries from sports, seems, well, unmanly. Despite all the focus on men's health in the slick monthlies like Esquire, Men's Health, GQ and Men's Vogue, heart attacks, strokes, diabetes and cancer take many of us to early graves.
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