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Impact Fees

NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
The Home Builders Association of Bucks/Montgomery Counties filed suit yesterday against 30 municipalities in the two counties over what it said were excessive fees charged to developers. The 30 communities, ranging from populous Upper Merion Township in Montgomery County to rural Plumstead Township in Bucks, have ordinances that require developers to help alleviate a community's costs of development by paying transportation "impact fees. " If, for example, a new development increases the amount of traffic on a road, the municipality might ask the developer to pay for a new stoplight.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown Township supervisors begrudgingly approved the second phase of a state-mandated impact-fee ordinance Tuesday night. The "roadway sufficiency analysis" is one aspect of a 1990 state law requiring municipalities to rewrite the rules and regulations of impact fees charged to developers. "This has been thrust upon us by the great state of Pennsylvania," said board Chairman Russell Kavana. "All townships across the state are sour with this. It's ludicrous. " Under the law, Act 209, enacted last December, municipalities are required to charge developers impact fees based on a formula involving peak-hour traffic generated by the development and the cost of improvements.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
The concept is simple: require builders to pay a development fee to offset the costs of roads, sewers and other improvements their projects necessitate. New Jersey municipal officials, faced with dwindling state and federal money for such improvements, support the idea. Industry organizations, including the New Jersey Builders Association and the New Jersey chapter of the National Association of Industrial and Office Park Builders, are willing to go along with the fees, provided they are limited to improvements to the water systems, waste-water removal, roads and drainage.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
It's the by the ways that can kill a builder. "They come at the last hour when the plans for a development are about to get final approval," said Dave Reel, of the Home Builders Association of Montgomery and Bucks Counties. "It's . . . by the way, we need this much for this intersection and this much for improvements to that street . . . those things can ruin you. " By the ways - impact fees, in official-speak - are the only way local officials can make sure developers pay their fair share for improvements to municipal roads, bridges, sewer systems and the like.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The House last night handed builders one victory after another before voting unanimously to pass a bill that would allow municipalities to impose fees on developers of new housing. If approved by the Senate and signed by Gov. Casey, the impact-fee bill would permit local governments to charge builders for improvements to roadways made necessary by new developments. A companion bill, which passed unanimously without debate, would allow similar charges for water and sewer lines. "In areas of rapid development, the people who own existing homes and suddenly see an influx of traffic will have some other source to look to for improvements without having their taxes go up," said Rep. David W. Heckler (R., Bucks)
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Uwchlan officials have joined their peers in other townships in calling for an equitable impact-fee structure for municipalities in which development is occurring. During a regularly scheduled meeting Monday, the Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a resolution calling for new state legislation that would allow municipalities to charge fees to offset the impact of new development on township services, such as water, sewers, transportation and police protection. In turn, the legislation would place the burden of new development costs on the developer, rather than on longtime residents.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
Five lawsuits filed over the last three years challenging impact fees levied by two Bucks County municipalities have been dismissed by Judge Leonard B. Sokolove in Bucks County Court in Doylestown. "The complaint contains no specific factual allegations whatsoever," Sokolove stated in his ruling Friday. He said that the suits failed to show that the impact fees had been applied to a member of the plaintiff group. The Home Builders Association of Bucks/Montgomery Counties Inc. had sued Newtown and Lower Makefield Townships for imposing fees on developers to pay for infrastructure needed to support developments.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The growing pains are familiar: Traffic jams, overburdened sewer systems and dwindling green spaces, all resulting from the boom in residential and commercial developments in area municipalities. Increasingly, townships in Montgomery County are looking to builders to ease those pains by charging them impact fees - fees they must pay when applying for building permits. Such fees are used to pay for traffic improvements, general services and parkland acquisition. In the past, many municipalities negotiated with builders during the planning stage for such things as open space or charges for sewer and water hookups.
NEWS
July 19, 2011
Gov. Corbett's industry-heavy advisory panel has recommended that gas drillers pay impact fees to cover damage to roads and the environment. But lawmakers in Harrisburg should go further than that and enact a plan that makes drillers at least also pay their rightful share toward keeping Pennsylvania green. During the roughly two years that a gas-drilling tax has been in dispute, the state has lost more than $200 million in potential revenue, according to a liberal-leaning Harrisburg think tank.
NEWS
January 13, 2002 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Impact fees provide one of the most potent weapons for both sides in the battle over sprawl. Many residential builders contend that the fees charged by municipalities to offset the costs of development are excessive and result in higher home prices that shut first-time and lower-income buyers out of the suburban market. The National Association of Home Builders, the umbrella group for 205,000 of the country's builders, published a handbook in 1997 to help its members block local impact-fee legislation.
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