CollectionsImpact Fees
IN THE NEWS

Impact Fees

NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Don't try to yield in Towamencin Township anymore. The Board of Supervisors passed an ordinance Wednesday, recommended by the township's Police Department, calling for changing the township's 56 yield signs to stop signs. Sgt. John Kramer, Towamencin traffic safety officer, on Thursday called the change "a precautionary measure because of the increased traffic and density in the neighborhoods. " "Some people don't stop for a stop sign. For them, a yield is like a green light," he said.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
Because of pending state legislation that would limit impact fees, Montgomery Township supervisors repeated themselves Monday when they approved the David Cutler Group's latest proposed development - just to be sure. Although already stated in a local ordinance, one of the conditions of final approval of Cutler's 53-lot Montgomery Lea subdivision included a $500 fee per unit. The project covers about 50 acres between Kenas Road and Limekiln Pike. "(Impact fees) haven't been declared illegal yet," said solicitor William R. Cooper.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Bensalem Township employee may have given a large clothing company an unauthorized break on highway impact fees, possibly in exchange for road improvements and a traffic light, officials said. Although no one is saying the change was improper, the board "doesn't know why that was done" without its knowledge, Councilwoman Barbara Barnes said. The township is trying to collect $78,000 in unpaid impact fees from Charming Shoppes Inc., a woman's clothing chain that moved its headquarters to the township in 1989.
NEWS
November 18, 1999
Impact fees, builders and development in Jersey The editorial (Inquirer, Nov. 3) on a New Jersey bill authorizing impact fees for new construction failed to acknowledge the real reason why the legislation was sent back to committee. The senators realized it was a badly written piece of legislation and that impact fees are too significant an issue on which to vote without more consideration. The Builders League is supportive of reasonable impact-fee legislation that would put in place the planning and administrative procedures necessary to assure that the fees are correctly calculated and appropriately assessed.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Suzanne Sczubelek, Special to The Inquirer
Roads in East Fallowfield Township may fall into disrepair in the wake of recent legislation curtailing municipalities' right to charge impact fees to developers. The Board of Supervisors Wednesday decided to perform capital-improvement studies on only five of 32 intersections needing repairs. "We just can't afford the improvements," said Supervisor David Leavitt. The legislation, among other provisions, requires municipalities to commission studies of roadways before charging impact fees.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Memo to political strategists in New Jersey: To win the senior citizen vote, dash school taxes. The Republican incumbents and Democratic challengers of the New Jersey Legislature's Eighth District took that advice to heart last night at an issues forum at Lenape High School. A half-filled auditorium, composed almost exclusively of senior citizens, many from Mount Laurel, listened as the candidates were questioned by members of the Citizens Education Coalition. During the early part of the evening, Democrats hit hard at the property tax. "Property taxes to fund schools are wrong," said Jim Smith, a Democratic candidate for the General Assembly in the Eighth District.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Adrienne Beard, Special to The Inquirer
Caln Township commissioners this week rejected the Phase III amendment proposed by the Downingtown Area Regional Authority (DARA) to expand its sewage-treatment capacity to accommodate Rouse & Associate's proposed Churchill development. The rejection does not affect the ongoing expansion plans of the Phase III committee. The proposed amendment was in reaction to Rouse's assertion that the Churchill project, which spans East and West Whiteland Townships, would generate about 800,000 gallons a day from East Whiteland.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
When does a revised plan become an entirely new plan? The answer to that question could determine when the long-awaited expansion of the Ralph's Corner shopping center in Hatfield Township takes place. At Tuesday night's Board of Commissioners meeting, Chairman John Norman maintained that a revised site plan submitted by Clemtree R. C. Associates contains enough substantive changes that it should be considered a new project. Commissioner Clyde Roberts agreed. But George Wrigley, president of the development company, argued that the modifications are minor enough to merely constitute a revised plan.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Marie Green, Special to The Inquirer
With new housing developments and the potential for dramatic increases in school enrollment breathing down its neck, the Avon Grove school board took action Tuesday to cope with the changing nature of the district. The board conditionally approved a bid to build relocatable classrooms, heard a report on the possibility of leasing classroom space from a local church, and indicated an interest in "impact fees" on developers. "There's no question that development is having an impact on the school district and shortly will have a monetary impact," said Superintendent Ronald J. Ferrari, citing reports of approval of a new 609-unit development with an 18-hole golf course in Kemblesville.
NEWS
August 6, 1996 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Plans for the new Spring-Ford Area High School are scheduled to go before the township supervisors tonight. But a dispute over impact fees stemming from the project remains to be resolved. Spring-Ford school board members were surprised to learn last week that the township apparently wants to charge the district more than $400,000 for road improvements under a new ordinance in the Limerick municipal code. The school board contends, however, that because it is already paying about $400,000 for improvements along Lewis Road, including a left-turn lane at the new high school's entrance, the impact fee should be waived or credited.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|