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Impasse

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NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an unusual maneuver, Temple University officials declared an impasse yesterday in their talks with striking faculty and announced that they would implement the terms of their last offer. Officials of the Temple Association of University Professionals (TAUP), whose strike is entering a record 20th day today, immediately denounced the step as illegal and an attempt to entice strikers to cross the picket lines. "They are doing everything to break this strike and spending all their energy trying to break this strike - intimidating and coercing people to come back - instead of negotiating," said Arthur Hochner, TAUP president.
NEWS
January 28, 1987 | By Jane Lenel, Special to The Inquirer
An impasse between the only two members of the Audubon Commission resulted in no action being taken last night on a number of reappointments to borough positions. The two members are Mayor Stanley Mojta and Commissioner Jane Merryfield, and the agenda for the meeting included reappointments to several township offices, including teasurer, borough solicitor and purchasing agent. However, Merryfield declined to make a motion for approval for any of the reappointments. Although the borough commission normally consists of three members, no replacement has been named to fill the seat vacated when Vincent Lobascio resigned in November.
SPORTS
August 13, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
The agent for Adam "Pacman" Jones said negotiations reached an impasse yesterday for Tennessee's top draft pick, news that caught the Titans' general manager by surprise. "I don't think I've ever seen this," Floyd Reese said. "So this one's kind of new. I've only been doing this for 30 years, and this is the first time the press got an e-mail and the GM didn't. " Agent Michael Huyghue flew into town Thursday hoping to conclude a contract for the sixth pick overall and the first defensive player taken in the draft.
NEWS
August 25, 2006 | Helen E. Krieble
Helen E. Krieble is founder and president of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation in Denver The power brokers in Congress have decided to take the summer off from the debate about how to secure America's borders and deal with the millions of people in the United States illegally. The only results from their vacation will be a still-unsolved problem, several thousand more illegals sneaking across the border, and the continued frustration of a public that does not find the issue so complicated.
SPORTS
February 5, 1988 | By PHIL JASNER, Daily News Sports Writer
Commissioner David Stern is hoping sheer dynamics will create a breakthrough in the NBA labor impasse. That is because the 23 player representatives are meeting tonight in Chicago with their general counsel, Larry Fleisher. The owners are meeting tomorrow morning. "I'm hoping the meetings will stir things up to a point that will get us back to discussions," said Stern, at the Sixers-Pacers game last night to participate in an anti-drug campaign with Nancy Reagan. The league and the NBA Players Association have been without a collective bargaining agreement since the final game of last season's playoffs.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writers
Talks between striking dockworkers and port employers hit a snag early today, when union leaders walked out of the talks, saying they were at an impasse. "Apparently, they don't want a contract," Lucien Blackwell, president of International Longshoremen's Association Local 1332, said as he emerged from the talks at 2:20 a.m. But Blackwell and other leaders returned to the bargaining table about 30 minutes later, summoned by martime negotiators who said they had a new proposal for them to consider.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Neither threats nor decisions were made last night when about 130 people, most of them school staff members, attended a Pitman school board meeting to protest their prolonged contract negotiations. "After five meetings with the board, we are at an impasse in our negotiations," said the lone speaker from the audience, Carol Fox, president of the 150-member Pitman Education Association. Board President Kathleen W. Benash said the two sides entered mediation last week through the state's Public Employees Commission.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal jurors deliberating the fate of six members of an elite Philadelphia narcotics squad said Tuesday that they were at "an impasse on one or more counts. " The six-man, six-woman panel alerted U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno of their stalemate in a note just after 2:30 p.m. - about 20 hours into their discussions. The judge sent them back instructions to keep trying to reach a unanimous verdict. "Although it may seem like an eternity, it has only been 31/2 days of deliberations," Robreno told them.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | By Gary H. Sternberg, Special to The Inquirer
Eastern Regional High School teachers and school board representatives will meet Sept. 2 with a state mediator to try to break an impasse in contract negotiations, officials said at the board's meeting last night. The contract for the Eastern Education Association, which represents about 100 teachers and 25 support staff members, expired June 30. A second day of mediation, if needed, has been set for Sept. 6. Orientation for freshmen and teachers is scheduled Sept. 6, and regular classes are set to begin Sept.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
An impasse has been declared in contract talks between the police and Radnor Township, and a three-member arbitration panel on Monday will begin reviewing proposals to find a solution. The police are asking for a one-year contract with an 8.5 percent wage increase and improvements in pension. The township is offering a three-year contract with wage increases of 3 to 4 percent each year. The decision by the arbitration panel will be binding on both parties. Under the current two-year contract, which expires Dec. 31, the starting salary for a police officer is $25,466 a year.
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NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Karen Langley and Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The next state budget is not due for two months, but after last year's gridlock, legislators on Monday took a step toward preventing a repeat of the stalemate that kept school funding bottled up for months. Returning after a two-week recess, members of the House Education Committee approved a bill that would keep school funds flowing if a budget is not enacted by Aug. 15 - six weeks after the next fiscal year starts July 1. The governor's office and Republican legislative leaders were not admitting the need for such an insurance policy.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Andrew Seidman, STAFF WRITERS
The crisis over Atlantic City's tapped-out cash reserves intensified in a 10-hour war of words Thursday, with the governor, mayor, and Assembly speaker all digging in to a stalemate that could shut City Hall from April 8 to May 2 and threatens to send the city off a financial cliff. But first, this being A.C., a word about the city's big Beer Fest, also scheduled for April 8: It's still on. In fact, said Mayor Don Guardian, nearly all 900 city workers, including police, fire, and public works, have agreed to work without pay when a broke government folds its cards for three weeks.
NEWS
March 25, 2016
With no resolution to Pennsylvania's record nine-month budget impasse in sight and with public schools contemplating closure, Gov. Wolf has succumbed to Republican obstruction and agreed to a plan that keeps the state in the fast lane toward fiscal instability and educational decline. In the end, he was abandoned by fellow Democrats in the legislature who pleaded with him to accept a fiscally indefensible budget rather than keep trudging toward the end of the fiscal year with no budget at all. Of the many disappointments of this budget, the greatest is its failure to address the state's structural deficit, the stark difference between the state's spending and receipts.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis and Kathy Boccella, STAFF WRITERS
In an unexpected and possibly unprecedented move, Gov. Wolf on Wednesday said he would let the latest $30 billion Republican spending plan become law, ending Pennsylvania's historic 266-day budget impasse. At a news conference in Harrisburg, Wolf reversed course on a promised veto by saying he would neither sign nor reject the proposal sent to him by legislators. Without either, it automatically becomes law Monday morning. Wolf said the Republican budget math "doesn't work" and he was loath "to put my name on something that I don't believe is exactly what we ought to have.
NEWS
March 17, 2016
By Berwood A. Yost Why don't we have a state budget? The answer is neither short nor simple. Pennsylvania's budget impasse is the direct result of three state policy failures: the failure to find the reliable funding sources that state government needs to operate, the failure to reduce the spending growth that existing laws require, and the failure to support reforms that make elections more competitive. Corporate taxes as a share of general-fund revenues have steadily declined because the amount of money generated by those taxes has remained, in inflation-adjusted terms, unchanged since 1988.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's lengthy budget impasse has caused the commission that accredits colleges regionally to question Temple and three other area universities about their ability to stay in compliance without a collective $600 million in state funding they have yet to receive. Temple, Pennsylvania State and Lincoln Universities, and the University of Pittsburgh must by April 10 provide a report on the effect the budget impasse has had on their operations, and detail their contingency plans.
NEWS
March 14, 2016
The spectacular failure of Gov. Wolf and the legislature to deliver a budget has put every home, business, and school in Pennsylvania at risk. Without a better resolution to Pennsylvania's nine-month budget crisis, there are only bad choices to make: Raise property taxes. Cut programs for the most vulnerable citizens - the elderly, disabled, and young. Lay off school workers, and perhaps shutter schools, before June. It's been weeks since legislative leaders and Wolf met face to face.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Lawmakers reached agreement Monday on a proposed constitutional amendment to expand casinos to North Jersey, breaking a weeks-long impasse that exposed tensions within the state Democratic Party ahead of the 2017 governor's race. "This involved a great deal of compromise on the parts of all parties," Gov. Christie said at a Statehouse news conference, where he was joined by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto (D., Hudson), who were locked in a standoff over the issue.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2016
Of all the things Pennsylvania 's divided government failed to fix in 2015 - the budget, pensions, schools, liquor sales - the one that leaves the business community feeling extra bemused is taxes. So many proposals: A natural gas extraction tax! An end to local property taxes, balanced by higher income taxes or broader sales taxes! Liquor-sale reform, to fund the cash-starved pensions! Special rates for business buildings! So far, it's none of the above. Gov. Wolf 's selective vetoes of the budget, his demands for more school funds, Republican insistence that new spending be paid for, and the lack of consensus on who should pay have business guessing.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When Moody's Investors Services downgraded the credit rating of the Philadelphia Corp. for Aging this week, it cited the tax-exempt organization's unwillingness to adjust to the lack of state funding during Harrisburg's nearly six-month budget stalemate. "I'm sorry, I'm not going to close programs," PCA's president, Holly Lange, said Thursday. "They can say I'm a poor manager, they can say whatever they want, I'm not going to close programs. " Instead, PCA has burned though a $10 million line of credit and a $4 million temporary increase in its credit line.
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