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Impatiens

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NEWS
August 10, 1998 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So there you are, a guest at the entrance to a rather fetching estate just outside the city. You are forgiven if you indulge in a moment of imagined royalty, a fleeting second of fantasied wealth, as you motor down the front drive past charming Tudor-style cottages, two greenhouses, a lush grassy field, tall cedars, stately oaks and weeping hemlocks, until you reach a magnificent home reminiscent of Sutton Place on the River Wey near Guildford in...
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, it's been a rite of spring. You hop in the car, head for the nearest garden center, and load up on impatiens, the best-selling, candy-colored annuals that thrive in shade, mound up like half a beach ball, and bloom their heads off till frost, asking little in return. But this year, disaster looms. There will be far fewer impatiens for sale. Gardeners who do buy them will be taking a risk that experts say isn't worth it. The plants will probably die, and the shade-loving alternatives being offered up may not cut it for many who depend on the easygoing, affordable impatiens to brighten their summer landscape.
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | By Greg McCullough, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They say they're not competitors and insist they're not pursuing some green-thumb grail for the best yard on the block. But once you get a good look at the flower gardens at 82 and 84 Greenfield Ave., you cannot help but wonder whether the Andersons and the Muses - neighbors and friends for more than 35 years - are not engaged in a subtle war of the roses. Is it mere coincidence that theirs are the only yards on the block boasting explosions of marigolds and impatiens? Or are their manicured lawns, sculpted hedges and painted fences aesthetic gambits in a secret battle of one-upmanship?
NEWS
May 24, 1996 | The Philaldelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
With the famous building behind them, volunteers added dashes of color to City Hall's north side yesterday. The flowers were impatiens and bright-eye vincas. The volunteers were (from left) Eileen Gallagher of Philadelphia Green, Madeline Santiago of PNC Bank and Mike Molloy of the Philadelphia Horticultural Society.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Patricia Schrieber
Be careful when weeding this early in the season. Seedlings from last year's plants may be hiding among the weeds you're about to yank from the ground. I try to leave the previous year's plant labels in the beds, so I'll remember to watch out for seedlings. I grew love-in-a-mist ( Nigella damascena ) for the first time last year, and it's already living up to its self-seeding reputation. If you see something you think may be a desirable plant, but you're not sure, wait a while.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
For the first time in years, City Hall was ablaze with color last summer. Impatiens of many hues brightened the beds in the courtyard. Geraniums and white impatiens were planted in beds on the north and east sides. In keeping with Mayor Rendell's desire that public and private agencies cooperate on civic projects, the Fairmount Park Commission, Provident National Bank and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society combined forces to plan and execute the plantings. The bank provided funding.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Trees, shrubs and other perennial plants are the backbones of our gardens. The annuals, such as impatiens, zinnias and petunias, are the icing on the cake. Pat Christopher of Newark, Del., a gardener and teacher, likes lots of icing. She experiments with the plants first in a community garden plot, to get a feeling for their performance, then works them into the garden around the house. Successful home-garden combinations, Christopher says, "come slowly. It's not something you learn overnight from a book.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Louise Barrow is like every gardener I know. When I complimented her on her garden in late summer, she responded, "I wish you could have seen it a couple of weeks ago. " Sure, some of her perennials were looking a little tired, but bright annuals filled the gaps in her borders, and she finally admitted that her neighbor had held a garden party the week before so the neighbor and her friends could enjoy the bloom. In front of the Barrow house in Strafford, Louise's husband, Elroy, grows some of the Main Line's tallest cannas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant your warm-weather-loving vegetables and flowers. Although the last frost date is two weeks behind us, it's not too late to add those plants to the garden. As long as you plant by this weekend - beans, tomatoes, peppers, and squash, along with annuals like zinnia, cosmos, and New Guinea impatiens - there's still enough time to satisfy your goals of good eating and plenty of beauty. Cut back ornamental grasses. With all the recent rain and warmer temperatures, clumps of larger ornamental grasses like Miscanthus and Arundo are putting out new growth, seemingly overnight.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, it's been a rite of spring. You hop in the car, head for the nearest garden center, and load up on impatiens, the best-selling, candy-colored annuals that thrive in shade, mound up like half a beach ball, and bloom their heads off till frost, asking little in return. But this year, disaster looms. There will be far fewer impatiens for sale. Gardeners who do buy them will be taking a risk that experts say isn't worth it. The plants will probably die, and the shade-loving alternatives being offered up may not cut it for many who depend on the easygoing, affordable impatiens to brighten their summer landscape.
LIVING
February 9, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lorraine Altrichter has already plotted this year's vegetable garden on grid paper - eggplants, sweet green and Italian frying peppers, French and German pole beans, Roma beans . . . And maybe, thanks to all the luscious gardening catalogs pouring into her Broomall home this time of year, heirloom seeds for Polish and Russian tomatoes. Altrichter visited Ukraine last summer and was fascinated by their funny shapes and golden, red and purple fruits. "There are so many different vegetables in this world we don't know about," she says.
NEWS
March 10, 2006 | By Michael T. Dolan
The Philadelphia Flower Show, which runs through Sunday at the Convention Center, is an inspiration to some gardeners, a glimpse of things to come for others, and to mothers of sons everywhere, a depressing preview of yet another garden that will be trampled during the light of day. It's difficult to maintain a garden when you have seven children - seven boys, no less. Such was my mother's fate during all the springs of my youth. My brothers and I made certain that our yard never made the cover of Better Homes and Gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2003 | By BECKY BATCHA For the Daily News
WITH THE Philadelphia Flower Show under way at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, gardeners throughout the Delaware Valley know that spring is just around the corner. What many don't know is that spring is also waiting at the end of an unmarked truck road in a dreary suburban industrial park just off County Line Road between York Road and the Second Street Pike. Indeed, spring has three secret hiding places there. This traffic-snarled, train-track-pocked neck of County Line Road is the center of a world-class - yet largely unknown - warehouse gardening district.
NEWS
November 15, 2002 | By Lisa B. Samalonis
On a recent night, Jack Frost appeared and put an end to the blossoming pink impatiens I thought would never perish. The icy coating slipped in and wilted the tall green stems and stole the vibrant petals. After another night, the plants flattened and grew slimy. I donned my garden gloves for the last time this season. As luck would have it, the annual flowers that I planted in one marathon weekend in May managed to last until November. Despite their longevity, not to mention beauty, I grew disgruntled as I bent and ripped and tugged and twisted to remove all the remnants of the forlorn flowers.
NEWS
August 10, 1998 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So there you are, a guest at the entrance to a rather fetching estate just outside the city. You are forgiven if you indulge in a moment of imagined royalty, a fleeting second of fantasied wealth, as you motor down the front drive past charming Tudor-style cottages, two greenhouses, a lush grassy field, tall cedars, stately oaks and weeping hemlocks, until you reach a magnificent home reminiscent of Sutton Place on the River Wey near Guildford in...
LIVING
June 19, 1998 | By Betsey Hansell, FOR THE INQUIRER
You can jazz up your doorway, deck and flower beds using plants in pots without resorting to a single petunia, geranium, begonia or impatiens - delightful as those ubiquitous annuals may be. Plants you can buy now - if you hurry - can fill those bare or colorless spots that inevitably appear in the flower border, and add fragrance and drama to your entrance or patio. You'll need to learn a few simple techniques of container planting, so visit the best nursery in your area, and let your imagination run free.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Each morning, Edward Everette picks up his wide metal shovel and his battered straw broom, wheels out the red hand truck with the plastic trash can on it, shuts the door of his brown-brick rowhouse and starts his daily tour of the neighborhood. In his gray-and-brown wool hat, old sweatshirt, jeans and black Converse high tops, the towering 63-year-old retiree with the smooth face and broad, lined hands makes his way to Snyder Avenue, keeping his eyes on the ground. He stares at the cement of the Ford Recreation Center playground, and the pavement in front of Exotic Nails at Sixth and Snyder.
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