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NEWS
December 13, 1989 | By Peggy L. Salvatore, Special to The Inquirer
Every time Ellen and Dave McClintock nestle a handmade treasure into tissue paper and tuck it into a box for a customer at Crossroads Crafts Inc. in Doylestown, they are performing an act of charity. They also are fulfilling one of Dave McClintock's dreams. It is a dream he has harbored since 1980 when he spent nearly three months as a volunteer teaching English in a Laotian refugee camp in Thailand. At the refugee camp, and also during his travels to Liberia and South Africa, McClintock was impressed by the beautiful handicrafts made in the villages.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Peggy L. Salvatore, Special to The Inquirer
Every time Ellen and Dave McClintock nestle a handmade treasure into tissue paper and tuck it into a box for a customer at Crossroads Crafts Inc. in Doylestown, they are performing an act of charity. They also are fulfilling one of Dave McClintock's dreams. It is a dream he has harbored since 1980 when he spent nearly three months as a volunteer teaching English in a Laotian refugee camp in Thailand. At the refugee camp, and also during his travels to Liberia and South Africa, McClintock was impressed by the beautiful handicrafts made in the villages.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2012 | By Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The U.S. trade deficit surged in January to the widest imbalance in more than three years after imports grew faster than exports. Rising oil prices helped drive imports to a record high, as did stronger demand for foreign-made cars, computers, and foods. And exports to Europe fell, a sign that the region's debt crisis could temporarily weaken U.S. growth just as the job market is strengthening. The January trade deficit widened to $52.6 billion, the Commerce Department reported Friday.
FOOD
October 25, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
STEVENSVILLE, Md. - It is deepest October on Chesapeake Bay, peak crab-picking season, the blue crabs coming in thick and fast and, blessedly, fat after an erratic summer and drought that sent them skittering up-bay, away from encroaching salt water to refuges in the Sassafras River, and the Elk. But the hubbub in the handful of crab houses that are left on the Eastern Shore - the Mexican pickers picking jumbo lump, the machines shaking out the flaked...
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
Tuesday is the 11th anniversary of 9/11. And three months later, we will mark the 71st anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The two worst attacks on American soil each resulted in nearly 3,000 deaths and led the nation to war. Still, given the passage of time, Dec. 7 will be noted with minimal, if any, reverence by most Americans, and, despite little more than a decade having lapsed since 9/11, already some memories are fading too fast....
NEWS
February 26, 2012
David Woods is a Philadelphia writer When the body of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is brought before the Romans, does the bard have them say, "Who dunnit?" No, he has Mark Antony deliver the eloquent "Friends, Romans, Countrymen" speech. And the Roman poet Horace showed his lyrical skill with: "Pick today's fruits, not relying on the future in the slightest. " Carpe Diem . He did not, you will note, say, "Have a nice day. " In both cases, the writers knew a simple truth: that language matters.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
John Wister elementary in Germantown is the little engine that could. "We're a quaint, small school," says teacher Marcia Sparagna, "but there's a big sense of community there. " In her classroom, two students clasp hands and dance while an unexpected voice - Dean Martin's - croons: "When the moon hits your eye, like a big pizza pie, that's amore . " The jubilation in Room 211 is due to Sparagna's third and fourth graders winning a pasta party for raising more money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society than any other Wister class, $450 in three weeks, predominantly in coins, the majority pennies, a whole lot of pennies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2007
"I DON'T MEAN to be rude, but . . . " If "American Idol" judge Simon Cowell has said it once, he's said it a thousand times - he even used the disclaimer for the title of his autobiography. But ask yourself: Why, exactly, are so many of us still listening? Especially when what follows is, to be perfectly honest, so often very rude? It was 231 years ago this week that a group of British colonists gathered in Philadelphia, and in language considered direct for its time, declared "that these united Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States, that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Ken Thomas and Luke Meredith, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Inserting his voice into a big night for Republicans, President Obama appealed to Iowa Democrats on Tuesday during the first balloting in the GOP presidential campaign, seeking to counter months of withering criticism in the state that launched his presidential ambitions four years ago. Obama told party activists in a live video teleconference that because of their support, the Iraq war ended, a health-care overhaul was signed into...
NEWS
April 22, 2011
By Daniel Deagler If Christmas were all you knew about Christianity, how much would you know? The honest answer has to be: not much. You would know that something special was going on - something special that was just beginning to unfold. But the accounts of Christmas in the Gospels are thin. The Nativity is mentioned in only two of the four canonical gospels, Matthew and Luke, and though these biblical accounts are beautiful and wondrous, they tell us almost nothing about the faith.
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