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Incentive

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NEWS
March 18, 1986
Girl Scouts would not have to sell cookies if people would donate when they are asked, but if you don't give the people something for their donation, you are refused. Part of the $2 price is a donation, little enough when you consider what they do with the money. Mary Shanley Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
The Ambler Planning Commission wants to shape the future of the borough through incentive zoning that would attract developers to build offices, apartments, stores and more parking around the railroad station. At Wednesday's meeting, commission members informally discussed the rail corridor, which is south of Tennis Avenue and west of Main Street. The area is zoned for heavy industrial and transportation purposes, allowing a mixture of retail and office uses. The borough could rewrite the zoning regulations to draw developers with incentives once the borough decides what kind of development it wants in the western end of town, planning consultant Steve West said.
SPORTS
January 5, 1991 | By Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles play the Redskins today in an NFC playoff game. Big deal. Much of America will be watching this afternoon (Channel 6, 12:30 p.m.) as the Eagles line up in a wild-card playoff, from which the winner will advance to round two of the NFL's newly expanded postseason climb to the Super Bowl. Do the players - those overpaid millionaires - care? Why would a professional football player - who in the most extreme cases already has it made, who has played in more football games than he can count, fought back from injuries to stay in the game just one more year, knows better than anyone that it is, after all, just a game - care whether his team wins a championship?
SPORTS
May 15, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Heisman Trophy winner Ricky Williams has either the best contract ever or one of the worst, depending on how his NFL career plays out. Williams, the New Orleans Saints' only draft pick, signed a seven-year deal yesterday with an optional eighth year. The contract includes an $8.84 million signing bonus and will be worth between $11.1 million and $68.4 million, contingent upon performance. If he performs in the NFL like he performed in college, his contract would be the most lucrative ever given a rookie.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Gail Gibson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
North Penn High School principal Juan Baughn is finding out again this year just how hard students will work for an A if it allows them to miss a couple of final exams. "They're going to the library. For some of them, that's very creative," Baughn told the district school board last week during an update on the Renaissance Program. The program, started in January, sets up rewards for high school students who improve their academic standing. Part of the program allows students who receive all A's during a semester to skip some final exams.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Sales by the major U.S. automakers fell 12.1 percent in mid-February compared with last year amid signs that carmakers' efforts to boost sales with more generous incentive plans were stalling, analysts said yesterday. Truck sales, an increasingly important part of the market, were off 13 percent. The Big Three U.S. carmakers, who have the most extensive incentive programs on the market, all reported double-digit car-sales declines for the Feb. 11-20 period. The estimated annual selling rate for the mid-February period was 6.2 million units, down from 7.2 million units in the comparable period a year before, analysts said.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
Upper Makefield Township Manager Richard Gestrich says it's simply a way "to make a better police officer" and to reduce crime. Ridley Township police Detective Sgt. Francis P. Bascelli Sr., who is president of the state Fraternal Order of Police, isn't so sure. The issue is an incentive plan in Upper Makefield's new two-year contract with its seven-member Police Department. The contract in the Bucks County community of 6,000 people provides a cash bonus for each officer who excels in five specified areas and a group bonus if the rate of certain crimes in Upper Makefield goes down during the term of the contract.
SPORTS
February 5, 1990 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
"X" marked the spot where Bishop Kenrick basketball teammates Brad Krenicky and John Haley vented their frustrations at 4:30 yesterday afternoon. Kenrick had just completed an entertaining, 86-74 Catholic North victory over host Cardinal Dougherty when Krenicky and Haley scrambled into the Looney Bin, the brown section of stands behind the east basket that looks like an oversized jury box. Using two strips of adhesive tape, someone had slapped an "X" over Kenrick's green and gold logo.
SPORTS
December 23, 2000 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb could have a Merry, Merry Christmas if he finds the end zone a lot tomorrow. According to league sources and McNabb's contract, he's close to securing an extra $1 million this season if he finishes among the top eight quarterbacks in touchdown passes. A playoff win means $250,000 more. A trip to the Super Bowl bumps that number to $750,000, while a Super Bowl win makes it a cool $1 million. This is especially intriguing this weekend, since the club with one of the more controversial demotions of the season will play the Eagles tomorrow.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1997 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The suits descended upon City Council yesterday with hands outstretched. City development officials - with their hotel-industry partners behind them - presented three proposed deals that need public financial support. Also presented was a proposal for a Naval Business Center, an 1,100-acre industrial and commercial park that city officials hope will become an engine of economic growth into the next century. In exchange for hotel financing, the city hopes to see 2,200 construction jobs, 900 permanent jobs, a $137 million increase in tax assessment and three gleaming hotels in Center City where vacant buildings now stand.
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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
We already know that the prospect of earning some cash helps people quit smoking. But a new study from the University of Pennsylvania found that the way cash rewards are structured can make a big difference in how well such programs work. People were far more likely to quit for six months if they had some skin in the game. The problem was getting them to invest some of their own money - they got it back if they stopped smoking - in a reward program. The results were striking enough, though, that CVS Health, which helped fund the study, is launching a deposit-based smoking-cessation program for employees next month.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers on Thursday pushed for greater oversight of the state's economic incentives programs, passing a bill that would require the Treasury Department to report on the efficacy of tax credits awarded to businesses. Since Gov. Christie took office in 2010, the state has awarded $5.2 billion in tax credits and subsidies, according to New Jersey Policy Perspective, a liberal-leaning research group. That is up from $1.2 billion over the previous decade, according to NJPP.
NEWS
February 10, 2015
WE'RE GUESSING that "no good deed goes unpunished" was a refrain heard around the offices of the Philadelphia School Partnership last week, following the mixed reaction to PSP's announcement that it was offering a $35 million gift to encourage the school district to approve up to 15,000 new charter-school seats. PSP is an alliance of businesses, charities and educators that raises funds for public, charter and private schools. So far, it has given $20 million to charters, $11 million to district schools and $3 million to private schools.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
After I dressed for Sunday's New York City Marathon, made sure I'd pinned my bib on straight, and put Clif Shot Bloks, ChapStick, and a $20 bill in my pocket, I took a Sharpie out of my backpack and wrote the number 261 on my right wrist. "What's that?" my mother asked. "I'll tell you later. " 261 is the bib number Kathrine Switzer wore when she became the first woman to officially run the Boston Marathon in 1967. Then, women were prohibited from participating - at least on paper, so Switzer registered as "KV Switzer.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Thursday asked the Legislature to beef up tax incentives for non-gambling projects in Atlantic City as part of an economic development bill. He conditionally vetoed the bill, passed by the Democratic-controlled Legislature in June, which would revise the state's economic incentive programs. Under Christie's revisions, non-gambling businesses in Atlantic City would be eligible for many of the same incentives as those in other poor cities, such as Camden. "Similar to Camden and other targeted cities in New Jersey that are in need of economic rejuvenation, I am recommending that non-gaming development projects and private-sector job growth in Atlantic City be eligible for the strongest possible incentives," Christie wrote in his conditional veto message.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the second year of a crusade to woo back students who have flocked to charter schools, officials in the Chester Upland School District have upped the ante with free laptops and headphones. The Chromebook laptop and hugely popular Dr. Dre Beats headphones - which retail for hundreds of dollars - were on the table this summer for students willing to abandon rivals such as Chester Community Charter School and return to Chester Upland classrooms or its new cyberschool. "We realize we're in a competitive environment," said Joe Watkins, the state-appointed receiver tasked with developing a recovery plan for the cash-strapped Delaware County district.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Senate President Stephen Sweeney says he will accept Gov. Christie's changes to a bill intended to expedite development of privately run public "Renaissance" schools in Camden. Christie, a Republican, axed a provision in the legislation that would have allowed the Camden school board to provide pension sweeteners as early-retirement incentives to some district employees. The state-run district laid off 200 teachers last spring because of budget cuts. "I am disappointed with the governor's conditional veto, but I am committed to moving the bill forward," Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A gusher in tax credits for companies seeking to locate in Camden is the product of a blockbuster economic incentives package passed by the New Jersey Legislature last year. After the 76ers landed a 10-year, $82 million tax break in June to open a practice facility across the Delaware River, the state Economic Development Authority last week approved $260 million in tax credits over the same period for the energy tech firm Holtec International to open a manufacturing plant on the Camden waterfront.
SPORTS
May 21, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Like every good organization, the NBA periodically brings in outsiders to study its operation and make suggestions with fresh eyes about ways the business model could be improved. Marketing specialists, economists, labor consultants, and advertising geniuses are trotted through, and the NBA listens carefully to their thoughts. Sometimes, of course, the league executives know what's coming. "I always get a kick out of when the economists first come in," commissioner Adam Silver said recently at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference.
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