CollectionsIncinerator
IN THE NEWS

Incinerator

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester City Council unanimously approved controversial expansion plans Wednesday for a trash incinerator along the city's waterfront that would allow the operator to accept waste shipped by train from New York. Council members told a packed audience that they understood concerns about the trash-to-steam plant's presence in Chester but could not deny the facility's right to operate. Covanta plans to construct two buildings, which the company said will allow it to accept trash in updated and safer containers.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | By Edward Ohlbaum, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bucks County should support the idea of an incinerator to get rid of the county's solid waste, Wrightstown supervisors said Monday in response to the county commissioners' poll of municipalities on the issue. But the resolution approved by the township's Board of Supervisors stopped short of an unqualified endorsement of the incinerator proposed in Falls Township. The board added four provisions. First, it said that recycling efforts should be "stepped up and used to dramatically cut the flow of trash.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A three-member negotiating committee of a citizens' group, the Community Council on Lankenau, has reached a tentative agreement with Lankenau Hospital officials on the installation of a new, higher-grade incinerator, both sides said this week. The agreement, which was completed Monday after more than a year of discussions, specifies the quality of equipment to be used in the incinerator as well as procedures for community oversight of its operation, the two parties said Tuesday in announcing the accord.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Carol Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Continuing its effort to keep an incinerator from being built on the edge of town, the Cinnaminson Township Council decided last night to join Palmyra Township in appealing the construction permit. In a special meeting, the council agreed to join Palmyra in retaining the Newark law firm Gordan & Gordan, specialists in environmental law, for $5,000. Riverton and Beverly Townships might also join the effort. Mayor Donn Lamon said Palmyra Mayor Bob Leather called a meeting June 10 for area mayors to consider sharing litigation costs to try to block the controversial trash incinerator.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
A citizens' group opposing Camden's proposed incinerator has finally secured enough valid signatures to mandate a binding referendum on the issue, both the Camden County Board of Elections and a Superior Court judge ruled yesterday. If the majority of voters rejects the incinerator, Camden would be required to adopt an ordinance banning its operation within city limits. But an assistant city attorney argued that the results of the referendum still would not be binding on the state, which he said has superseding power over local laws in solid-waste matters.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
The controversy over a proposed trash incinerator in Pennsauken spilled over into neighboring Cherry Hill last night, as the Township Council tabled a resolution endorsing construction of the incinerator. Council members debated not only the need for the incinerator, but also the need for a resolution concerning it. "Why bother?" asked Michael Bristow, Republican council member and Camden County freeholder, saying that Cherry Hill had no control over the project's fate. Bristow said the resolution was sent to the township by Jack Tarditi, the Democratic mayor of Haddonfield, where the Board of Commissioners recently passed a similar resolution.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County Judge Susan Devlin Scott yesterday rejected a request for a preliminary injunction by an environmental group seeking to stop the planned trash incinerator in Falls Township. Members of the group, Bucks People United to Restore the Environment (B- PURE), had sought to overturn a permit that the Falls Township Supervisors granted to Wheelabrator Technologies Inc. for the proposed incinerator. The group contended that the township supervisors violated the state Sunshine Law three times, March 15 and 22 and April 12, by not providing enough chairs in the auditorium and by intimidating people opposed to the incinerator.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By Edward Ohlbaum, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Without much discussion, the Upper Makefield supervisors agreed Wednesday that they did not favor using an incinerator to dispose of the township's trash. The supervisors voted, 4-0, to approve a resolution that they do not wish to preserve the local option of incineration for the municipality's solid waste. Supervisor Lester Balderston abstained. "Do you really think they will not build the incinerator in Falls Township because we don't favor it?" Balderston said.
NEWS
August 22, 1986 | By Lori Goldstein, Special to The Inquirer
The National Park Borough Council rejected a bid Wednesday from a Woodbury Heights well-drilling company to build a trash-to-steam incinerator on the town's abandoned Hawthorne landfill. By a 5-0 vote, the council defeated a proposal to lease a portion of the 73.5-acre property to W.C. Services. The firm planned to construct a facility that could burn up to 100 tons of trash daily. The council rejected the plan after W.C. Services had sought to amend its original proposal.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A Superior Court judge in Burlington County yesterday refused to stop construction of the incinerator at the Pennsauken landfill. Judge Martin L. Haines denied a motion by the attorney for three Burlington County municipalities, who had asked for a restraining order to stop construction. Haines said too many facts were in question for him to agree that the incinerator would pose health hazards. At the same time, Haines delayed until Sept. 28 a motion by the attorney for the Pennsauken Solid Waste Management Authority to throw out the municipalities' case.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester City Council unanimously approved controversial expansion plans Wednesday for a trash incinerator along the city's waterfront that would allow the operator to accept waste shipped by train from New York. Council members told a packed audience that they understood concerns about the trash-to-steam plant's presence in Chester but could not deny the facility's right to operate. Covanta plans to construct two buildings, which the company said will allow it to accept trash in updated and safer containers.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to build a 15,000-square-foot facility at the Chester incinerator plant to house garbage imported by rail from New York City has been put on the shelf. After some residents raised questions, the Chester City Planning Commission tabled a vote on the plan for 30 days. The commission had been expected to approve permits Wednesday night for the Covanta Energy proposal, but 12 protesters showed up at the meeting asking for a review of the project. Covanta, which has 100 employees in Chester, has operated the trash incinerator on Highland Avenue since 1992.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what opponents are calling a victory, a company that wants to build a hazardous-waste incinerator in lower Bucks County has put its efforts on hold indefinitely. Allen Toadvine, attorney for Route 13 Bristol Partners, said Bristol Township had asked for more specifics on the potential release of pollutants, and said the firm needed to choose a manufacturer for the plant before it could provide those details. The township Zoning Hearing Board was to consider Monday the firm's application for a variance to build the incinerator, the first step in a years-long approval process that would end at the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRISTOL TOWNSHIP It's a fight that Pennsylvania hasn't seen since the 1990s: A company proposes to build a commercial hazardous-waste incinerator, and residents and environmentalists mobilize to stop it. The battle was reignited last month in Bristol Township, Bucks County, where plans were unveiled for a 50,000-square-foot plant to burn pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and other waste within a mile of the Delaware and densely populated towns....
BUSINESS
August 28, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capital One Corp. is still best known as a credit-card lender that spends a lot of money trying to convince consumers to borrow more. But the Virginia-based loan giant, which waged a costly effort to diversify in the 2000s, has also become one of the biggest lenders to Philadelphia construction projects. The bank's growth here dates to the financial-collapse year of 2008, when it hired a team to build up its East Coast commercial real estate projects headed by veteran business banker Rick Lyon , who trained at the old Philadelphia National Bank and served its successors for 28 years.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Covanta Holding Corp. has paid $48.6 million for a incinerator in Camden, the Morristown, N.J., company said this week. The Camden facility last year turned about 319,000 tons of waste into more than 146,000 megawatt hours of renewable electricity, Covanta said. The plant employs 50. Covanta also owns similar facilities in Chester and Conshohocken. The seller was Foster Wheeler A.G., a Swiss company with corporate offices in Clinton, N.J.   Contact Harold Brubaker at 215-854-4651 or hbrubaker@phillynews.com  
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Rahim Faiez and Heidi Vogt, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Clashes between Afghan troops and protesters angry over the burning of Muslim holy books at a U.S. military base left at least seven people dead and dozens wounded Wednesday, as anger spread despite U.S. apologies over what it said was a mistake. The demonstrations across four eastern provinces illustrated the intensity of Afghans' anger at what they saw as foreign forces flouting their laws and insulting their culture. The violence was also a reminder of how easily Afghan-U.S.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
OK, KIDS, IT'S official, the Capital City of the nation's sixth-largest state is in a "fiscal emergency" and one step closer to a state takeover. The Legislature and Gov. Corbett, acting with fervor, speed and resolve not seen in the Capitol since Ed Rendell worked buffet lines, brought the hammer down. The Jewel of the Susquehanna, the birthplace of Newt Gingrich, the home of the longest stone-arch railroad bridge in the world, is belly up. How could this happen? What does it mean?
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County officials could soon be out of the incinerator management business. Under a plan being considered, the South Camden incinerator, built in the early 1990s, would be turned over to Foster Wheeler, the Swiss corporation that runs the facility, Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. said. The question of whether to end government control over the incinerator comes as three of the county's largest towns - Cherry Hill, Voorhees, and Gloucester Townships - have agreed to join forces to see if they can find cheaper trash-disposal options on the open market.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|