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Income Inequality

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NEWS
August 10, 2011
RE THE LETTER from Todd S. Cohen, "Eat the Rich, Too?": Are you a tea-party member, "Faux Snooze" watcher? Because you sound typically brainwashed! Try usa.gov and other credible sites of truth before you back such morons as Sarah Palin and Michele Bachmann. The so-called "job creators" are the very ones sending our jobs overseas! They've had 11 years of GWB's tax breaks but created zero jobs. During the '70s, the top 1 percent of Americans held about 8 percent of the wealth because of taxes.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
FIFTY years ago, Lyndon Johnson used his first State of the Union address to declare a war on poverty. At that time, 19 percent of Americans lived below the poverty line. Thanks to the programs created during Johnson's war - including Medicaid, Medicare, food stamps and Head Start, among others - poverty was cut by one quarter over three years. Today, at 16 percent, the poverty rate is just three percentage points below 1964's high-water mark; the United States now has 11 million more people living in poverty than it did 50 years ago. Tonight, during his State of the Union address, President Obama is expected to deliver what many might consider a system upgrade - version 2.0 of the war on poverty.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Mark Zandi
Mitt Romney's run for the presidency has highlighted the widening gulf between the nation's haves and have-nots. As a founder in the 1980s of Bain Capital - among the nation's most prominent private-equity firms - Romney became extremely wealthy. As his tax returns show, he continues to receive tens of millions of dollars each year in returns on his investments. As Romney rightly argues, he has nothing to apologize for - his success reflects his talent and gives him real credibility when discussing the economy.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Has income inequality exacerbated the financial crisis or slowed a recovery? How should "fairness" be addressed? The issue has many facets in this election year and needs to be sorted out. "Breaking down the income gap into real terms," at money.usnews.com, gives the income gap historical perspective, with notes on a so-called "great compression" of the income scale for decades after the Great Depression, and the subsequently unfolding "great divide"...
NEWS
June 19, 2003 | By Jonah Goldberg
If Bill Gates and I started our own country in which we were the only residents - call it Gatesbergia - it would be racked by the worst income inequality in the world. The "haves" of the society would make hundreds of thousands of times more than the "have nots. " The disparities of wealth in our nation would be worse than those in Brazil, Nigeria or even - gasp - the United States. And, if Warren Buffet, the Sultan of Brunei and Rupert Murdoch immigrated to Gatesbergia, the problem would be even worse, for the gap would get wider and I would be "left behind.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Protestant bishop from Philadelphia will join clergy from around the country next week in a visit to the Vatican to meet with advisers to Pope Francis to discuss how the pope's message of inclusion applies to race relations in the United States. Bishop Dwayne Royster, head of Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower, and Rebuild (POWER), said the group wants to convey to the Vatican how low wages, criminalization, immigration, detention, and police brutality have hurt families in the U.S. "One of the things we're trying to say to the pope very clearly, and convey to his advisers, is, in the U.S., when you talk about any justice issue, race is at the center of it," Royster said.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | By Joel Schwartz and David Murray
What ails American society today? Culprits abound - the claim that "It's the economy, stupid" has been met with the retort that it's really the culture instead. Are the rich to blame for capturing more wealth, or have the poor simply abandoned their virtue? In reality, both sides are half-right: It's stupid to focus on either the economy or the culture as the exclusive source of our problems. Indeed, economic revitalization is inconceivable if our culture continues to greet the family's decline with indifference.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
IN 1969, THE PROP seen round the world was the nightstick that Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo stuck in the cumberbund of his tuxedo as he joined his fellow officers to roust rioters in the city. That iconic image (below) illustrated how Rizzo presided over a Police Department known for rough tricks and brutality. In 2011, the city's top cop gets another kind of prop: proper accolades for how he (and the mayor) handled the de-occupation of Dilworth Plaza. Though City Hall declines to offer numbers of cops deployed, hundreds of officers flooded the city Tuesday night and yesterday morning to make sure the city's planned eviction of protesters happened peacefully.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
IN TODAY'S AMERICA, the poor are apparently getting poorer. Then again, so is the middle class. And just like in the days leading up to the Great Depression, the rich are getting even richer. Figures released by the Census Bureau yesterday (full story on Page 31) show that poverty is the highest it's been since 1994 - and for working-age people 18 to 65 years old, it's the highest since 1965, when President Johnson declared a war on it (that ended in a stalemate). For millions of low- and middle-income Americans, the economic ladder has gone only down during the recession.
NEWS
October 14, 2008
JOHN McCain wants to be the maverick in this election, but on taxes and the economy he offers nothing more than the same Bush formula: Help the rich, then wait and see. McCain supports the irresponsible Bush tax cuts he once opposed, which won't help the struggling middle class. The big chunk of his proposed tax cut will go to those Americans making more than $2.9 million a year, while the rest of us will foot the bill. Once again, McCain seems to be siding with market fundamentalists who feel no need to address the income inequality negatively affecting our country.
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NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Protestant bishop from Philadelphia will join clergy from around the country next week in a visit to the Vatican to meet with advisers to Pope Francis to discuss how the pope's message of inclusion applies to race relations in the United States. Bishop Dwayne Royster, head of Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower, and Rebuild (POWER), said the group wants to convey to the Vatican how low wages, criminalization, immigration, detention, and police brutality have hurt families in the U.S. "One of the things we're trying to say to the pope very clearly, and convey to his advisers, is, in the U.S., when you talk about any justice issue, race is at the center of it," Royster said.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
AFEDERAL JUDGE has ruled that 26 Occupy Philadelphia protesters who were rounded up near City Hall on the final night of their 2011 encampment can move forward with a lawsuit alleging that cops falsely arrested them and violated their civil rights. But U.S. District Judge Berle Schiller tossed out part of the suit, including a charge that police used excessive force during their arrests that ended the lengthy protest on Nov. 30, 2011. City officials had ordered the demonstrators, part of the nationwide Occupy movement protesting income inequality and other issues, out of Dilworth Plaza so that the current $50 million renovation project could begin.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
FIFTY years ago, Lyndon Johnson used his first State of the Union address to declare a war on poverty. At that time, 19 percent of Americans lived below the poverty line. Thanks to the programs created during Johnson's war - including Medicaid, Medicare, food stamps and Head Start, among others - poverty was cut by one quarter over three years. Today, at 16 percent, the poverty rate is just three percentage points below 1964's high-water mark; the United States now has 11 million more people living in poverty than it did 50 years ago. Tonight, during his State of the Union address, President Obama is expected to deliver what many might consider a system upgrade - version 2.0 of the war on poverty.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A week before President Obama is to deliver his State of the Union address, Sen. Robert P. Casey of Pennsylvania is joining a growing chorus of Democratic legislators calling on Congress to raise the federal minimum wage. In a wide-ranging conference call with reporters Tuesday that focused on income inequality, Casey reiterated his support for the Fair Minimum Wage Act, a bill introduced last year that he cosponsored. Supported by Obama and other Democrats, the bill would raise the national minimum wage to $10.10 an hour from its current $7.25.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT TURNS out that the much-ballyhooed economic recovery of 2012 sailed right by the middle class in a golden-hulled mega-yacht, leaving most of us to fight off drowning from its massive, champagne-frothed wake. A new report from top researchers found that last year was the worst 12 months for U.S. income inequality since 1928 - the year before the Wall Street crash that kicked off the Great Depression. The millionaires and billionaires of the "1 Percent" saw their earnings spike by roughly 20 percent in 2012, the researchers found, while the other 99 percent of Americans brought home a paltry 1 percent pay hike, on average.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
I LISTEN to presidential speeches with an ear to the parts about personal finance. In President Obama's second inaugural address, he made a few interesting points. The first came when he said, "For we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. " I immediately wondered: Do we as a nation really understand this? I don't think so. If we did, I wouldn't receive numerous emails from people criticizing programs that help those who fell into the housing sinkhole.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
GOP, follow Stevens' example Will Pennsylvania ever produce another Republican leader on par with Thaddeus Stevens ("'Lincoln' lays bare messy reality of process," Sunday)? Stevens' adamant promotion of equality and opportunity contrasts starkly with the present state GOP. Whether it is the voter-ID law that would disproportionately impact communities of color, or the push to replace public schools with charter schools, we have clearly regressed from the civil rights standards set by Stevens.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2012 | By Hope Yen, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The middle class is receiving less of America's total income, its smallest share in decades, as median wages stagnate and wealth concentrates at the top. A study released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center highlights diminished hopes, too, for the roughly 50 percent of adults defined as middle class, with household incomes ranging from $39,000 to $118,000. The report describes this mid-tier group as suffering its "worst decade in modern history," falling backward in income for the first time since the end of World War II. Three years after the recession technically ended, middle-class Americans are still feeling the economic pinch, with most saying they have been forced to reduce spending in the last year.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Carol Morello, Washington Post
Rising income inequality has led to an increasing number of Americans clustering in neighborhoods in which most residents are like them, either similarly affluent or similarly low-income, according to a new study detailing the rising isolation of the richest and the poorest. A report released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center said the percentage of upper-income households situated in affluent neighborhoods doubled between 1980 and 2010, rising to 18 percent. In the same time frame, the share of lower-income households located in mostly poorer neighborhoods rose from 18 percent to 23 percent.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | by U.S. Rep. Bob Brady
ONE OF THE MOST destructive and troubling trends in our nation is the growth of income inequality. The increasing concentration of wealth at the top, the shrinking of our middle class and the growing number of people who are working but still poor threatens our future prosperity and, as research of countries around the world shows, undermines our democracy. Frustration over this state of affairs is strong and palpable among many people I meet in my district. But the problem is so large in scope that many seem to feel unsure how to address it, or even hopeless that it can be solved.
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